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FOUR NOVELLAS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Different_Seasons

Different Seasons (1982) is a collection of four Stephen King novellas with a more serious dramatic bent than the horror fiction for which King is famous.[1] The four novellas are tied together via subtitles that relate to each of the four seasons. The collection is notable for having had three of its four novellas turned into Hollywood films, one of which, The Shawshank Redemption, was nominated for the 1994 Academy Award for Best Picture.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Novellas

2 Title

3 See also

4 References

Novellas[edit]

Name Subtitle Film adaptation

Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption Hope Springs Eternal The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

Apt Pupil Summer of Corruption Apt Pupil (1998)

The Body Fall From Innocence Stand by Me (1986)

The Breathing Method A Winter's Tale

FOUR NOVELLAS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_past_Midnight

Four past Midnight is a collection of novellas by Stephen King. It is his second book of this type, the first one being Different Seasons. The collection won the Bram Stoker Award in 1990 for best collection[1] and was nominated for a Locus Award in 1991.[2] In the introduction, Stephen King says that, while a collection of four novellas like Different Seasons, this book is more strictly horror with elements of the supernatural.[this quote needs a citation]

COLLECTION OF FOUR NOVELLAS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Dark,_No_Stars

Full Dark, No Stars, published in November 2010, is a collection of four novellas by the author Stephen King, all dealing with the theme of retribution.[1][2] One of the novellas, 1922, is set in Hemingford Home, Nebraska: home of Mother Abagail from King's epic novel The Stand (1978), the town adult Ben Hanscom moves to in It (1986), as well as the setting of the short story "The Last Rung on the Ladder" (1978). The collection won the 2010 Bram Stoker Award for Best Collection and was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Collection. Also, 1922 was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Novella.[3][4]

 

Contents [hide]

1 Contents

2 Background information

3 Release

4 Critical response

5 Adaptations

6 References

Contents[edit]

The four novellas are:

 

1922

Big Driver

Fair Extension

A Good Marriage

FOUR BRADY CHILDREN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_on_Maple_Street

After a summer spent abroad, the four Bradbury children return to their home on Maple Street and discover that something is growing upwards through the house's walls from below, replacing wood and plaster with metal and machinery, counting down to some cataclysmic event. Although somewhat afraid of what this was, Trent, the eldest of the four, realizes they have an opportunity to rid both themselves and their beleaguered mother of the tyrannical Lewis "Lew" Evans, their hated and feared stepfather. As the countdown approaches its final minutes, they contrive to lock Lew in his study and leave him to his fate, escaping the house just in time to watch as it raises itself from its foundations and blasts away into the clouds. The story ends with the children waiting on the curb for their mother to return, shaken but glad to be free from Lew's oppressive rule.

VISION FOUR MEN TO GO AGAINST FLAGG

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Stand_characters

Abagail receives visions from God, though when she believes she's sinned due to pride, she loses her foresight and goes into exile in the wilderness. She later regains her ability and returns to the Boulder Free Zone, just in time to inadvertently save most of the Free Zone Committee from Harold Lauder's assassination attempt. On her deathbed, she shares one final vision: four men from the committee are to travel to the West coast to confront Flagg. She makes no prediction as to what will occur, only that one will fall before arriving in Las Vegas, while the remainder will be brought before Flagg. Mother Abagail dies shortly after revealing this prophecy.

 

A 22-year-old deaf-mute drifter, originally from Caslin, Nebraska, Andros is beaten and robbed outside of (fictional) Shoyo, Arkansas by some local thugs, shortly after the start of the epidemic. Mildly injured in the assault and initially jailed, Andros is befriended by the local sheriff and his wife. Andros expresses intent to press charges against his attackers, and the sheriff jails the three of the four that can be found, before falling ill with the superflu. Andros becomes the newest deputy, due to the absence of any other healthy people, and watches two of the four thugs who were responsible for assaulting him die of the plague in the local jail. The sheriff dies as well. Andros later frees the third prisoner, and tends to the sheriff's wife before she also dies.

 

In the original novel, Andros falls from a bicycle and hits his head in the abandoned Shoyo, but scratches on his leg from the fall become infected and leave him sick for days. In the revised–expanded edition of the novel, a sickened and fugitive Ray Booth (the fourth attacker of Andros) attacks him a second time in the emptied Shoyo. In the course of the attack, Booth nearly blinds one of Andros's eyes, and in a panic, Andros accidentally fires the gun holstered on his belt and the bullet scrapes his leg, causing the limb to become infected. Although Andros kills the plague-weakened Booth, the resulting damage to his eye means that he must wear an eye patch for most of the remaining story.

 

Ralph Brentner, an amiable Midwest farmer and United States Army veteran, meets Andros and Cullen as their paths cross on a highway between Oklahoma and Nebraska—together they form the first party to find Mother Abagail. Despite a lack of formal education, Brentner possesses a great deal of common sense and is very skilled with tools and machines; Brentner uses a powerful radio transmitter to contact other groups of survivors across the country. Brentner is elected to the first Free Zone Committee, a position that he accepts reluctantly and typically serves as Andros's "voice", reading his notes to the others during committee meetings. Brentner survives Lauder’s assassination attempt—but loses the third and fourth fingers on his left hand—and is chosen as one of the four people to stand against Flagg. Along with Redman, Bateman, and Underwood, Brentner walks to Las Vegas and is instrumental in convincing Underwood to leave Redman behind after he breaks his leg. Brentner is captured by Flagg, along with Bateman and Underwood, and Flagg plans an execution by dismemberment to occur in front of the Golden Nugget Hotel in downtown Las Vegas. Brentner is the first to notice the "Hand of God" as it descends from the sky to detonate Trashcan Man’s nuclear weapon, killing everyone present.[8]

ONE OF STEPHEN KINGS FAVORITE NOVELS QUARTET FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raj_Quartet

The Raj Quartet is a four-volume novel sequence, written by Paul Scott, about the concluding years of the British Raj in India. The series was written during the period 1965–75. The Times called it "one of the most important landmarks of post-war fiction."[1]

 

The novels[edit]

The four volumes are:

 

The Jewel in the Crown (1966)

The Day of the Scorpion (1968)

The Towers of Silence (1971)

A Division of the Spoils (1975)

FOUR CHARACTERS FOLLOW A RULE OF FOUR METHOD

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rule_of_Four

The Rule of Four is a novel written by the American authors Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason, and published in 2004. Caldwell, a Princeton University graduate, and Thomason, a Harvard College graduate, are childhood friends who wrote the book after their graduations.

 

The Rule of Four reached the top of the New York Times Bestseller list, where it remained for more than six months.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Plot summary

2 Critical reception

3 See also

4 References

5 External links

Plot summary[edit]

 

This article's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. (January 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The book is set on the Princeton campus during Easter weekend in 1999. The story involves four Princeton seniors, both friends and roommates, getting ready for graduation: Tom, Paul, Charlie and Gil. Tom and Paul are trying to solve the mystery contained within an extremely rare, and mysterious book, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, which was an incunabulum published in 1499 in Venice, Italy; it is a complex allegorical work written in a modified Italian language frequently interspersed with material from other languages as well as its anonymous author's own made-up words.

 

Tom, the narrator, is the son of a professor who had dedicated his life to the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Throughout the novel, he struggles between being fascinated by the book and trying to pull away from the obsession that drew a rift between his father and his mother and is now causing discord between him and his girlfriend, Katie Marchand.

 

Paul Harris, is a young scholar who is writing his senior thesis on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili and has spent all four of his undergraduate years studying the book and is on the edge of solving the book's mystery.

 

Charlie and Gil are supporting characters to Tom and Paul's project.

 

The novel charts the relationship between the four roommates and how obsession can be both a boon and a burden. It is a story about growing up as much as solving the mystery of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. The disciplines of Renaissance science, history, architecture, and art are drawn upon to solve the mystery.

 

Tom, or Thomas Corelli Sullivan, often found himself distracted by his father's death. His father was a close friend of Richard Curry and Vincent Taft, both of them advisors for Paul's thesis. The flashback goes on as Taft distanced himself from both Curry and Tom's father at some point to carry out his own research. Taft also developed a rivalry with both men in the quest to decode the Hypnerotomachia's 500-year-old secret. By luck, Tom's father found a letter, dating back to Renaissance times, referring to the book's supposed author, Francesco Colonna. Tom's father even wrote a book, The Belladona Document, which revolves around the mysterious letter. But, a negative critique from his academic rival Vincent Taft spelled the demise of the book's popularity as well as his career. Taft allegedly also stole a diary written by a contemporary of Colonna's that Curry had found. That diary, as Paul and Tom discovered it later, would prove to help the duo to decode the elusive Hypnerotomachia.

 

In the end, Paul discovers that the Hypnerotomachia contains a number of hidden and enciphered texts, with the solution to each one revealing a clue towards the next one. However, after solving a chain of several of these, he finds a text that says that there will be no more clues and he must solve the rest of the book on his own. He realizes that the entire book contains a message encoded by following a "rule of four", in which the message starts with one letter, then moves to a letter four rows down, then ten columns right, then two rows up, then two columns left, and repeating. The placement of this hidden text throughout the entire book explains the Hypnerotomachia's strange syntax, use of multiple languages, and neologisms. Through days of tough work, Paul and Tom managed to unravel a series of riddles, which they solved soon later. The application of the "rule of four" method enabled them to slowly piece together portions of a dark Renaissance secret that has avoided human knowledge for centuries.

 

The author of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, Francesco Colonna, was a Renaissance humanist in Florence. He was an ardent fan of knowledge, books, arts and anything that has a Renaissance identity on it. His passion for Greek and Roman literature was immense. But, one Girolamo Savonarola saw the exact opposite; Florence was gradually turning into a free-thinking city, with its people starting to forget God and worshipping knowledge. As soon as he rises to power in Florence, Savonarola starts the infamous Bonfire of the Vanities, a practice of burning books and art that seemed to contain elements of blasphemy. Colonna could not stand this practice and confronted Girolamo Savonarola himself as a sign of protest, only to be disappointed. Colonna started the building of a large underground vault to seal away a number of ancient books and pieces of art to preserve them and protect them from the followers of the priest. On one occasion, to prove his stand, Francesco and two of his men walked onto the raging inferno of the bonfire. As a result, Francesco met a fiery end. As he expected, the death of Francesco sparked the cry against the reign of Savonarola, who was later hung and burnt to ashes. Before dying, Colonna wrote the Hypnerotomachia, a crypted book in his efforts to uplift humanism despite religious dogmas. He disguises its contents in a seemingly innocent piece of Renaissance romantic literature, concerning the love between Poliphilo and Polia. Hypnerotomachia Poliphili itself meant "Poliphilo's Struggle of Love in a Dream".

four friends
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raft_(short_story)
Four college students named Randy, Deke, Rachel and LaVerne, decide to swim to a wooden raft on a remote Pennsylvania lake to celebrate the end of summer.

While swimming out to the raft in the middle of the lake, Randy notices a mysterious oil slick-like substance floating on the surface that appears to go after the girls as they reach the raft. Deke and LaVerne ridicule Randy's suspicions that the oil slick was chasing the girls until Rachel remarks on the beautiful bands of colors on the slick's surface and touches it. The oil slick instantly coats her finger and pulls her into the water, where it covers her with itself and dissolves her alive. The horrified trio are helplessly forced to watch her die.

After the initial panic, the three remaining friends contemplate their next course of action. They realize they are trapped by what is apparently some unknown blob creature that is waiting to devour whoever enters the water. Swimming past the creature is not an option, as it moves too fast. The group has driven eight miles off the nearest back road without having told anyone where they were going, making rescue impossible. Their only hope is to wait and see if it goes away. The iridescent surface of the creature hypnotizes and disorients them into almost falling off the raft, but they realize that it can be avoided if you look away in enough time. After a while, the creature squeezes under the raft. Deke decides he could make a swim to the shore, but as he prepares to jump into the lake the creature oozes up through two boards and grabs him by his foot. Unable to free their friend, Randy and LaVerne watch helplessly as Deke is slowly pulled through the crack by the creature and devoured. LaVerne faints from the sight; Randy fights to maintain his sanity and contemplates swimming to shore while the creature is busy eating Deke, but finds he cannot do so, as laying her down would cause her to suffer the same fate as Deke.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartet_(2012_film)

Quartet is a 2012 British comedy-drama film based on the play Quartet by Ronald Harwood, which ran in London's West End from September 1999 until January 2000.[2] It was filmed late in 2011 at Hedsor House, Buckinghamshire. The film is actor Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut.

Quartet is a play by Ronald Harwood about aging opera singers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartet_(Harwood)

Is there any chance that these four will ever sing together again? A gala concert is about to take place at the retirement home to celebrate Verdi's birthday. Three of the four are keen to recreate the third act quartet "Bella figlia dell'amore" from Rigoletto and one is not. But the play eventually moves to an uncertain conclusion when they don costumes and lip-synch to their own retro recording.

QUARTET

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_Padura_Fuentes

Padura is best known in the English-speaking world for his quartet of detective novels featuring lieutenant Mario Conde. Collectively titled Las cuatro estaciones (The four seasons), sometimes called The Havana Quartet in their English translations. Conde is a cop who would rather be a writer, and admits to feelings of "solidarity with writers, crazy people, and drunkards". The novels are:

 

Pasado perfecto (1991, translated as "Havana Blue", 2007)

Vientos de cuaresma (1994, translated as "Havana Gold", 2008)

Máscaras (1997, translated as "Havana Red", 2005)

Paisaje de otoño (1998, translated as "Havana Black", 2006)

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Travelers_Quartet

Time Travelers Quartet is a series of four young adult time-travel romance books by Caroline B. Cooney.

ONE OF THE STORIES WAS CALLED "THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Enright

Enright also wrote the popular Melendy Quartet, a series of four children's novels published between 1941 and 1951: The Saturdays, The Four-Story Mistake, Then There Were Five, and Spiderweb for Two. This series tells the adventures of four siblings who live in New York City with their father, a writer, and a housekeeper named Cuffy.

 

Melendy quartet

1941 - The Saturdays Farrar & Rinehart — ALA Notable Book

1942 - The Four-Story Mistake, Farrar & Rinehart

1944 - Then There Were Five, Farrar & Rinehart

1951 - Spiderweb for Two: A Melendy Maze, Farrar & Rinehart


ONE OF THE STORIES WAS CALLED "THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Enright

Enright also wrote the popular Melendy Quartet, a series of four children's novels published between 1941 and 1951: The Saturdays, The Four-Story Mistake, Then There Were Five, and Spiderweb for Two. This series tells the adventures of four siblings who live in New York City with their father, a writer, and a housekeeper named Cuffy.

 

Melendy quartet

1941 - The Saturdays Farrar & Rinehart — ALA Notable Book

1942 - The Four-Story Mistake, Farrar & Rinehart

1944 - Then There Were Five, Farrar & Rinehart

1951 - Spiderweb for Two: A Melendy Maze, Farrar & Rinehart

STORY ABOUT FOUR CHILDREN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Four-Story_Mistake

The Four-Story Mistake

The Four-Story Mistake is a children's novel written and illustrated by Elizabeth Enright, published by Farrar & Rinehart in 1942. It is the second book in the Melendy family series which Enright inaugurated in 1941. The family leaves World War II-era New York City for a house in the country, a house that is an adventure in itself.

 

In 2012 The Four-Story Mistake was ranked number 80 among all-time best children's novels in a survey published by School Library Journal – the third of three books by Enright in the top 100.[2]

 

Contents [hide]

1 Plot

2 Reception

3 References

4 External links

Plot[edit]

The four Melendy children live with their father, a widowed professor of economics, and Cuffy, their beloved housekeeper. During the height of World War II, the Melendy family moves out of New York City and into the countryside. Miranda "Randy", the third child, dislikes change and is saddened by the move. But the house they move into turns out to be an adventure. Called by locals "The Four-Story Mistake", it is an odd-looking house with a rich architectural history, surrounded by the country.

 

The four Melendy children soon find adventure discovering the many hidden attractions of the house. Oliver discovers buried history, Rush is stranded in a tree during a storm, Randy finds a diamond in the most unlikely of places, and Mona learns what it truly means to be an actress. None of them could have guessed at the secret hidden in their very own play space, the office—a secret that had been shut away for over 60 years.

 

Reception[edit]

The Saturday Review of Literature called The Four-Story Mistake "special because of its uncontrived, carefree humor and its modern appeal to everyone".[3] Kirkus Reviews gave it a starred review for "books of remarkable merit" and praised it for "[p]lenty of action and incident; good dialogue; and a feel for people and the things they think and do".[4]

STORIES ABOUT THE FOUR MELENDY CHILDREN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Saturdays_(novel)

The Saturdays is a children's novel written and illustrated by Elizabeth Enright, published by Farrar & Rinehart in 1941. It is the first of four books in the Melendy family series, introducing the four Melendy children who determine to stop wasting their Saturdays, pool their allowances, and take turns having adventures in pre-World War II New York City.

 

The four Melendy children live with their father, a widowed professor of economics, and Cuffy, their beloved housekeeper, in a brownstone in New York City. There's thirteen-year-old Mona, who has her heart set on becoming an actress; twelve-year-old mischievous Rush, who plays the piano; ten-year-old Miranda "Randy" who loves to dance and paint; and thoughtful Oliver, who is six.

 

Tired of wasting Saturdays doing nothing but wishing for larger allowances, the four Melendys jump at Randy's idea to start the Independent Saturday Afternoon Adventure Club (I.S.A.A.C.). If they pool their resources and take turns spending the whole amount, they can each have at least one memorable Saturday afternoon of their own. Before long, I.S.A.A.C. is in operation and every Saturday is definitely one to remember. Each Melendy child is able to do exactly what he or she pleases, discovering new ideas along the way. Randy becomes friends with an old lady who was once kidnapped by gypsies, Rush brings home a stray dog, and Mona shocks her family by taking her first step toward adulthood. But when Oliver wants to be out on his own, too, the rest of the family has second thoughts.

THE STORIES ABOUT FOUR BRITISH CHILDREN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Narnia_(film_series)

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)[edit]

Main article: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, based on the novel of the same title, is the first film in the series. Directed by Andrew Adamson, it was shot mainly in New Zealand, though locations were used in Poland, the Czech Republic and the United Kingdom.

 

The story follows four British children who are evacuated during the Blitz to the countryside and find a wardrobe that leads to the fantasy world of Narnia. There, they must ally with the lion Aslan against the forces of the White Witch, who has Narnia under an eternal winter.

 

The film was released theatrically on December 9, 2005 and on DVD on April 4, 2006 and grossed over $745 million worldwide.

 

Prince Caspian (2008)[edit]

Main article: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

Prince Caspian, based on the novel of the same title, is the second film in the series and the last distributed by Walt Disney Pictures.

 

The story follows four British children who were transported to Narnia in the previous film returning to Narnia, where 1,300 years have passed and the land has been invaded by Telmarines. The four Pevensie children aid Prince Caspian in his struggle for the throne against his corrupt uncle, King Miraz.

 

The film was released on May 16, 2008. It grossed $419 million worldwide.

QUARTET OF BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortal_Engines

Mortal Engines is the first of four novels in Philip Reeve's quartet of the same name. The book focuses on a futuristic, steampunk version of London, now a giant machine striving to survive on a world running out of resources. The book has won a Nestlé Smarties Book Prize and was shortlisted for the 2002 Whitbread Award.[1]

 

London is the principal Traction City in the novel, which has returned to a Victorian-era society. London's society is divided into four major and a number of minor Guilds

The Dalemark Quartet is a series of four fantasy books by Diana Wynne Jones set in a rustic parallel universe with pre-industrial or even medieval civilization.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalemark_Quartet

The Dalemark Quartet titles are listed below in the order of publication, which is different from the order of internal chronology (shown by Arabic numerals in parentheses):

 

Cart and Cwidder, 1975 (3)

Drowned Ammet, 1977 (2)

The Spellcoats, 1979 (1)

The Crown of Dalemark, 1993 (4)

DC QUARTET

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Pelecanos

After the success of his first four novels, the Stefanos-narrated A Firing Offense, Nick's Trip, and Down by the River Where the Dead Men Go, and the non-series (though some characters do cross over) Shoedog, Pelecanos switched his narrative style considerably and expanded the scope of his fiction with his D.C. Quartet. He has commented that he did not feel he had the ability to be this ambitious earlier in his career.[1] The quartet, often compared to James Ellroy's L.A. Quartet, spanned several decades and communities within the changing population of Washington. Now writing in the third person, Pelecanos relegated Stefanos to a supporting character and introduced his first "salt and pepper" team of crime fighters, Dimitri Karras and Marcus Clay.

 

In The Big Blowdown, set a generation before Karras and Clay would appear (the 1950s), Pelecanos followed the lives of dozens of D.C. residents, tracking the challenges and changes that the second half of the twentieth century presented to Washingtonians. King Suckerman, set in the 1970s and generally regarded as the fans' favorite, introduced the recurring theme of basketball in Pelecanos' fiction. Typically, he employs the sport as a symbol of cooperation amongst the races, suggesting the dynamism of D.C. as reflective of the good will generated by multi-ethnic pick up games. However, he also indulges the reverse of the equation, wherein the basketball court becomes the site of unresolved hostilities. In such cases, violent criminal behavior typically emerges amongst the participants, usually escalating the mystery. The Sweet Forever (1980s) and Shame the Devil (1990s) closed the quartet and Pelecanos retired Stefanos and the other characters that populated the novels. (Stefanos and other characters do re-appear in subsequent works.)

 

In 2001, he introduced a new team of private detectives, Derek Strange and Terry Quinn, as the protagonists of Right as Rain. They have subsequently starred in the author's more recent works Hell to Pay (which won a Gumshoe Award in 2003) and Soul Circus. While these books have cemented the author's reputation as one of the best current American crime writers and sold consistently, they have not garnered the critical and cult affection his D.C. quartet did. Rather, they seem to be continuing the author's well received formula of witty protagonists chasing unconflicted criminals behind the backdrop of popular culture references and D.C. landmarks.

FOUR NOVELS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.A._Quartet

The L.A. Quartet is a sequence of four crime fiction novels by James Ellroy set in the late 1940s through the late 1950s in Los Angeles.[1][2][3] They are:

 

(1987) The Black Dahlia

(1988) The Big Nowhere

(1990) L.A. Confidential

(1992) White Jazz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sleeping_Beauty_Quartet

The Sleeping Beauty Quartet is a series of four novels written by American author Anne Rice under the pseudonym of A. N. Roquelaure. The quartet comprises The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, Beauty's Punishment, Beauty's Release, and Beauty's Kingdom, first published individually in 1983, 1984, 1985, and 2015 in the United States. They are erotic BDSM novels set in a medieval fantasy world, loosely based on the fairy tale of Sleeping Beauty. The novels describe explicit sexual adventures of the female protagonist Beauty and the male characters Alexi, Tristan and Laurent, featuring both maledom and femdom scenarios amid vivid imageries of bisexuality, homosexuality, ephebophilia and pony play.[1]

LONG PRICE QUARTET

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Abraham_(author)

Daniel James Abraham (born November 14, 1969), pen names M.L.N. Hanover and James S. A. Corey, is an American novelist, comic book writer, screenwriter, and television producer. He is best known as the author of The Long Price Quartet and The Dagger and the Coin fantasy series, and with Ty Franck, as the co-author of The Expanse series of science fiction novels, written under the joint pseudonym James S. A. Corey. The series has been adapted into the television series The Expanse (2015–present), with both Abraham and Franck serving as writers and producers on the show.

 

The Long Price Quartet[edit]

A Shadow in Summer (March 7, 2006)

A Betrayal in Winter (August 21, 2007)

An Autumn War (July 22, 2008)

The Price of Spring (July 21, 2009)

FOUR BOOKS

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Song_of_the_Lioness

 

The Song of the Lioness is a series of young adult fantasy novels published in the 1980s by Tamora Pierce. The series consists of four books: Alanna: The First Adventure (1983), In the Hand of the Goddess (1984), The Woman Who Rides Like a Man (1986) and Lioness Rampant (1988).

FOUR BOOKS

 

The Immortals quartet, by Tamora Pierce, is the story of Veralidaine Sarrasri (known as Daine), an orphan with an unusual talent: she can speak with animals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Immortals_(series)

Contents [hide]

1 Books

1.1 Brief summary

2 Characters

2.1 Main

2.2 Immortals

2.3 Animals

2.4 Others

3 See also

Books[edit]

Wild Magic

Wolf-Speaker

Emperor Mage

The Realms of the Gods

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predator_Cities

Predator Cities is the title of a tetralogy, sometimes called the Predator Cities Quartet, consisting of four novels: Mortal Engines (2001), Predator's Gold (2003), Infernal Devices (2005), and A Darkling Plain (2006), written by the British author Philip Reeve.[1] Originally known as the Mortal Engines Quartet,[2] it was known in the United States as the Hungry City Chronicles, over the author's objections to this title.[3]

FOUR IMMIGRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Four_Immigrants_Manga

The Four Immigrants Manga, also known as Manga of the Four Students (漫画四人書生 Manga Yonin Shosei?), is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Henry Yoshitaka Kiyama. The manga was published as 52 "episodes", with each episode as a two-page-spread with the intention of serialization in a Japanese language newspaper. The individual episodes were self published by Kiyama as a one-shot manga in 1931.[1] It was republished in Japan by Shimpu in August 2012.[2] It was translated into English by Frederik L. Schodt and was published by Stone Bridge Press as The Four Immigrants Manga: A Japanese Experience in San Francisco 1904-1924 in October 1998.[3][4]

 

Contents [hide]

1 Development

2 Reception

3 References

4 External links

Development[edit]

The manga drew from the experiences of Kiyama and his three friends when they were college-age Japanese immigrants to San Francisco between 1904 and 1924.[3][5] The year 1924 is chosen as it was when the "immigration laws stiffened and some of the protagonists elected to return to Japan".[6][7] Inspired by western comic strips, Hiyama drew Four Immigrants with each episode in a two page spread, ending at 52 episodes for a year's worth of weekly newspaper comic strips.[5] Jason Thompson notes that "each strip has sort of a punchline, but also tells a story; it's not so different from reading a yonkoma manga in which the story is broken up for gags every four panels."[5] Kiyama tried to have Four Immigrants serialized by a Japanese-language newspaper in San Francisco, but was unsuccessful.[3] In 1927, Kiyama exhibited the pages of the manga in a gallery of Kinmon Gakuen, with the exhibition titled "A Manga North American Immigrant History" (Manga Hokubei Iminshi).[5][8] The manga covered the immigrants' arrival and quarantine on Angel Island as well as major events of the time: 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Panama–Pacific International Exposition of 1915 and the 1918 flu pandemic with criticism of "several Congressional acts designed to curtail Asian immigration."[9][10] Most of the manga "concentrates on student immigrant experiences prior to the Gentlemen's Agreement of 1907".[11]

THE ELITE FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boys_Over_Flowers

Hana Yori Dango (花より男子?, lit. "Dango [Preferred] over Flowers") is a Japanese shōjo manga series written and illustrated by Yoko Kamio. The story is set in Eitoku Academy, an elite school for children from rich families. It follows lead protagonist Tsukushi Makino, a student from a working-class family, and the members of Eitoku Academy's elite Flower Four, commonly known as the "F4".

 

Eitoku Academy (英徳学園 Eitoku Gakuen?) is a school that caters to children from rich, high-society families. Hence, Tsukushi, who comes from a poor family, is considered by others to be the "weed" of the school. The school is ruled by the "Flower Four" group, more commonly known as the F4. The F4 leader, who is the son of the wealthiest, most powerful family in Japan, Tsukasa Domyouji, takes an interest in Tsukushi because she is the only girl at Eitoku who does not fawn over him. However, his hot-headed nature and bullying ways are originally a major turn-off for Tsukushi, who has her sights set on Rui Hanazawa.

FOUR DIVINE KINGS FOUR PARTS OF WORLD FOUR BROTHERS FOUR SISTERS FOUR TYCOONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sohryuden:_Legend_of_the_Dragon_Kings

The story features four divine Dragon Kings, rulers of the four parts of the world according to Chinese myths. The brothers are reborn in the modern world, complete with supernatural powers and the ability to become the Dragons which are their true forms. They are content to live ordinary lives as long as nobody meddles with them.

 

It becomes the mission of the four brothers to defeat the "Four Sisters", organization headed by four tycoons from America connected with the "Bulls" - enemies of the Dragons who have received ownership of the Western half of the world while the Dragons keep rule over the Eastern half of the world - before they use their control over technology and the economy to take over the world. However, as this battle begins, the four brothers must also find their place in the world as they flee from the destructive will of the "Bulls".

FOUR BITES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truck_Dogs

Truck Dogs: A Novel in Four Bites is a children's adventure/science fiction novel by Australian author Graeme Base, who is famous for his large picture books such as Animalia. It was published in 2003 and nominated for a CBCA 2004 Book of the Year for younger readers. The novel is supposed to take place in the future, but the setting is ultimately a fantasy world based on a rural desert town (as in the Australian outback or the western United States). All of the characters are caricaturized, anthropomorphic dogs of various breeds, part biological and part machine. Their lower bodies are formed by the chassis and wheels of some kind of modern vehicle, often a truck. Reviewers have referred to the novel as a meeting of Hell and the Book of Revelation[1]

FOUR CHILDREN AND THEIR DOG

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_on_a_Treasure_Island

It has been suggested that the book was influenced by L. T. Meade's 1892 book Four on an Island, which also recounts a story of four related children including a tomboy along with a dog living on an island with a shipwreck.[1]

FOUR CHILDREN- THE FOUR BOYS ARE DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES OF THE QUADRANT AND THE AUTHOR OF THE BOOK WROTE THE BOOK TO TEACH LESSONS TO HIS FOUR BOYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Swiss_Family_Robinson

The novel opens with the family in the hold of a sailing ship, weathering a great storm. The ships' passengers evacuate without them, and William and Elizabeth and their four children (Fritz, Ernest, Jack and Francis) are left to survive alone. As the ship tosses about, the father - William - prays that God will spare them.

 

Written by Swiss pastor Johann David Wyss, edited by his son Johann Rudolf Wyss and illustrated by another son, Johann Emmanuel Wyss, the novel was intended to teach his four sons about family values, good husbandry, the uses of the natural world and self-reliance. Wyss' attitude toward education is in line with the teachings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and many episodes involve Christian-oriented moral lessons such as frugality, husbandry, acceptance and cooperation.[1]

FOUR CHILDREN- THE FOUR BOYS ARE DIFFERENT PERSONALITIES OF THE QUADRANT AND THE AUTHOR OF THE BOOK WROTE THE BOOK TO TEACH LESSONS TO HIS FOUR BOYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Swiss_Family_Robinson

The novel opens with the family in the hold of a sailing ship, weathering a great storm. The ships' passengers evacuate without them, and William and Elizabeth and their four children (Fritz, Ernest, Jack and Francis) are left to survive alone. As the ship tosses about, the father - William - prays that God will spare them.

 

Written by Swiss pastor Johann David Wyss, edited by his son Johann Rudolf Wyss and illustrated by another son, Johann Emmanuel Wyss, the novel was intended to teach his four sons about family values, good husbandry, the uses of the natural world and self-reliance. Wyss' attitude toward education is in line with the teachings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and many episodes involve Christian-oriented moral lessons such as frugality, husbandry, acceptance and cooperation.[1]

 

Fritz – The oldest of the four boys, he is 15. Fritz is intelligent but impetuous. He is the strongest and accompanies his father on many quests.

Ernest – The second oldest of the boys, he is 13. Ernest is the most intelligent, but a less physically active boy, often described by his father as "indolent". Like Fritz however, he comes to be an excellent shot.

Jack – The third oldest of the boys, 11 years old. He is thoughtless, bold, vivacious, and the quickest of the group.

Franz (sometimes translated as Francis) – The youngest of the boys, he is 8 years old when the story opens. He usually stays home with his mother.

THE SERIES FOLLOWS FOUR CLANS OF FERAL CATS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warriors_(novel_series)

Warriors is a series of novels published by HarperCollins; it is written by authors Kate Cary, Cherith Baldry, Tui Sutherland, with the plot developed by editor Victoria Holmes, who collectively use the pseudonym Erin Hunter. The series follows the adventures of four Clans of wild cats—ThunderClan, ShadowClan, WindClan, and RiverClan —in their forest and lake homes. SkyClan, the long-forgotten fifth Clan of the forest, is later introduced in the stand-alone novel Firestar's Quest. It receives additional focus in the novel SkyClan's Destiny, the manga trilogy SkyClan and the Stranger, and the 2013 novella Cloudstar's Journey. A few cats in the series are Firestar and Graystripe, though there are way more.

THE FOURTH APPRENTICE- FOUR CLANS OF WILD CATS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warriors:_Omen_of_the_Stars

The Fourth Apprentice takes place approximately six months after the end of Sunrise, during the summer, when the four Clans are suffering due to a drought. In ThunderClan, sisters Dovekit and Ivykit become apprentices with Lionblaze as Dovepaw's mentor and Cinderheart as Ivypaw's. While out in the forest, Dovepaw speaks of seeing brown animals (beavers) up the river building a dam, causing the drought, but no other cat believes her. Lionblaze realizes that Dovepaw is one of the Three foretold in the prophecy "There will be three, kin of your kin, who hold the power of the stars in their paws", of which he and his brother Jayfeather are also a part. They each have a special power, and he realizes that Dovepaw's is the ability to see and hear things very far away, i.e., clairvoyance.

FOUR CLANS FOUR ORIGINAL LEADERS

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secrets_of_the_Clans

History of the Clans[edit]

The beginning of the book tells the story of how the Clans came to be in the first place. This section describes that before the Clans it was every cat for themselves. Then the members of the dead come and visit the living cats, telling them to unite or die. Four cats named Thunder, Wind, River, and Shadow volunteered to be leaders of a single Clan, but they were so different that they became four different Clans.

FOUR ATTEMPTS BY CROCODILE- LAST ATTEMPT TRIES TO EAT FOUR CHILDREN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Enormous_Crocodile

First of all, the crocodile heads into a coconut tree forest, not far from a town and disguises himself as a small coconut tree with branches and coconuts, hoping to eat 2 children, Toto and Mary, but is exposed by Humpy Rumpy the Hippopotamus.

 

Next, the crocodile heads to a children's playground outside an ancient school and disguises himself as a see-saw, with the aid of a piece of wood, hoping to eat a whole class of children, but is exposed by Muggle-Wump the Monkey.

 

Then, the crocodile heads to a funfair and, when nobody is looking, he disguises himself as a wooden crocodile on a merry-go-round by sandwiching himself between a brown wooden lion and a fearsome yellow dragon, (with a red tongue sticking out of its mouth,) hoping to eat a young girl named Jill who wants to ride on him, but is exposed by the Roly-Poly Bird.

 

Last of all, the crocodile heads to a picnic place outside the town and disguises himself as a long, wooden four-legged bench, hoping to eat 4 children who are going out on a picnic together, but is exposed by Trunky the elephant.

THE TREE GIVES FOUR THINGS- THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Giving_Tree

In his childhood, the boy enjoys playing with the tree, climbing her trunk, swinging from her branches, and eating her apples. However, as the boy grows older, he spends less time with the tree and tends to visit her only when he wants material items at various stages of his life. In an effort to make the boy happy at each of these stages, the tree gives him parts of herself, which he can transform into material items, such as money (from her apples), a house (from her branches), and a boat (from her trunk). With every stage of giving, "the Tree was happy".

 

In the final pages, both the tree and the boy feel the sting of their respective "giving" and "taking" nature. When only a stump remains for the tree, she is not happy, at least at that moment. The boy does return as a tired elderly man to meet the tree once more and states that all he wants is "a quiet place to sit and rest," which the tree could provide. With this final stage of giving, "the Tree was happy".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch_Bitch

Switch Bitch is a 1974 short story collection for adults by Roald Dahl. The book is made up of four stories: "The Visitor", "The Great Switcheroo", "The Last Act", and "Bitch". Each story deals in some way with sex and deception. Furthermore, "The Visitor" contains the first appearance of Uncle Oswald, who appears again in "Bitch".

FOUR CHILDREN- THE FOURTH ADDED LATER- FOURTH ALWAYS DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Family_Circus

The central characters of Family Circus are a family whose surname is rarely mentioned (although the cartoon of August 26, 2013, in which Billy refers to "Grandma Keane" and "Grandma Carne" indicates the same surnames as the author's family). The parents, Bil and Thelma (Thel), are modeled after the author and his wife, Thelma Carne Keane.[2][3][4] Their four children, Billy, Dolly, Jeffy, and P.J., are fictionalized composites of the Keanes' five children. With the exception of P.J., no characters have aged appreciably during the run of the strip.

 

An early strip featuring (L to R) Daddy (Bil), Dolly, Billy, Mommy (Thel), and Jeffy. A fourth child, P.J., was introduced in 1962.

VERY FAMOUS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child)

Genie was the last, and second surviving, of four children born to parents living in Arcadia, California

16 SHARDS

http://coppermind.net/wiki/Shard

The Shards of Adonalsium, or Shards for short, are pieces of the power of creation itself.[2] They are named after a specific action or ideal, called an intent. A mind must control a Shard. When a person holds a Shard, they are imbued with its power, but they also become the Shard.[3] A person who has taken up the power of a Shard is the Vessel of that Shard.[4]

 

There are sixteen Shards[5], and they are the most powerful known entities in the cosmere. They are related to many, if not all, magic systems, and for practical purposes, they are gods. All Shards started at an equal power level.[6]

The Four Marys[edit]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunty
"The Four Marys" was the longest story the comic ran—drawn by artist Barrie Mitchell, it appeared from its creation in 1958 to its end in 2001. When the strip started, public boarding schools like St. Elmo's, the girls' boarding school, were common, but as time went on, they became less accessible to Bunty's general audience. It centred on four young teenagers who lived in a girls-only boarding school in Elmbury, and often had problems with studying, being bored, or helping (and being hindered by) the other girls or teachers within the school. Of the four main characters, two were middle class, one was the aristocratic daughter of an Earl, and one was a working class girl, attending the school on a scholarship. This representation of the working class was a reflection of changing class experiences in the 1950s.[4]

FOUR GIRLS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_English_Roses

The English Roses is about the lives of four girls — Charlotte, Amy, Grace and Nicole — who become jealous of a girl called Binah. They believe that her life is perfect, and are jealous of her for it, but Binah is lonely. Binah's mother died when she was young and she lives with her father in a small house where she cooks and cleans for a living. Binah has no friends but the English Roses think she must be popular, rich and spoiled but she really isn't like that.

FOUR PART NOVEL

 

The Blind Sunflowers (Spanish: Los girasoles ciegos) is a 2004 Spanish novel written by Alberto Méndez.

 

Film adaption[edit]

Main article: The Blind Sunflowers (film)

This novel was adapted into a film with the same name in 2008.

 

There are four parts in the book that each contains a story about the Spanish Civil War.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blind_Sunflowers

The Blind Sunflowers fourth part has three narratives throughout the story. One of the narratives is Lorenzo, who is remembering the past, his childhood during the aftermaths of the Spanish civil war. Another narrative is the Priest, Brother Salvador. His narrative is more of a confessional. He writes a letter in pompous and nationalist language. He also uses Latin words, which show he has studied in the church. His narrative is an epistolary. The third narrative is a third voice narrative. The third voice narrative watches the family and fills in all the gaps.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Moons_of_Darkover

Four Moons of Darkover is an anthology of fantasy and science fiction short stories edited by Marion Zimmer Bradley. The stories are set in Bradley's world of Darkover. The book was first published by DAW Books (No. 761) in November, 1988.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_the_New_Sun

The Book of the New Sun (1980 – 1983) is a series of four science fantasy novels or one four-volume novel written by American author Gene Wolfe. Alternatively, it is a series comprising the original tetralogy, a 1983 collection of essays, and a 1987 sequel.[a] Either way, it inaugurated the so-called "Solar Cycle" that Wolfe continued after 1987 by setting other multi-volume works in the same universe.[1]

 

Gene Wolfe had originally intended the story to be a 40,000-word novella called "The Feast of Saint Catherine", meant to be published in one of the Orbit anthologies, but during the writing it continued to grow in size.[2][3] Despite being published with a year between each book, all four books were written and completed during his free time without anyone's knowledge when he was still an editor of Plant Engineering, allowing him to write at his own pace and take his time.[4]

FOUR NOVELS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_the_Long_Sun

The Book of the Long Sun (1993–1996) is a series of four science fantasy novels or one four-volume novel by the American author Gene Wolfe. It is set in the same universe as The Book of the New Sun series that Wolfe inaugurated in 1980, and the Internet Science Fiction Database catalogs them both as sub-series of the "Solar Cycle", along with other writings.[1]

EXTREMELY FAMOUS- HAS FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Sense_(pamphlet)

The first and subsequent editions divided the pamphlet into four sections

EXTREMELY FAMOUS- HAS FOUR SECTIONS- I WATCHED DOCUMENTARIES ON THIS BOOK IT IS EXTREMELY FAMOUS 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Sense_(pamphlet)

The first and subsequent editions divided the pamphlet into four sections

 

IV. On the Present Ability of America, with some Miscellaneous Reflections

The fourth section of the pamphlet includes Paine's optimistic view of America's military potential at the time of the revolution. For example, he spends pages describing how colonial shipyards, by using the large amounts of lumber available in the country, could quickly create a navy that could rival the Royal Navy.

THERE WAS FOUR PARTS- THE FOURTH PART WAS ADDED LATER- FOURTH IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digest_(Roman_law)
The Digest, also known as the Pandects (Latin: Digesta seu Pandectae, adapted from Ancient Greek πανδέκτης pandektes, "all-containing"), is a name given to a compendium or digest of Roman law compiled by order of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) emperor Justinian I in the 6th century (AD 530-533). It spans 50 volumes, and represented a reduction and codification of all Roman laws up to that time.

The Digest was part of the Corpus Juris Civilis, the body of civil law issued under Justinian I. The other two parts were Institutes of Justinian, and the Codex Justinianus. A fourth part, the Novels (or Novellae Constitutiones), was added later.

THE MANUAL OF ROMAN LAW CONSISTED OF FOUR BOOKS- THE FOURTH DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corpus_Juris_Civilis

The Corpus Juris (or Iuris) Civilis ("Body of Civil Law") is the modern name[1] for a collection of fundamental works in jurisprudence, issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Emperor. It is also sometimes referred to as the Code of Justinian, although this name belongs more properly to the part titled Codex Justinianus.

 

 

Nonetheless, Justinian found himself having to enact further laws and today these are counted as a fourth part of the Corpus, the Novellae Constitutiones (Novels, literally New Laws).

 

The Four Parts

1.1 Codex

1.1.1 Legislation about religion

1.2 Digesta

1.3 Institutiones

1.4 Novellae

 

 

Institutiones[edit]

Main article: Institutes of Justinian

As the Digest neared completion, Tribonian and two professors, Theophilus and Dorotheus, made a student textbook, called the Institutions or Elements. As there were four elements, the manual consists of four books. The Institutiones are largely based on the Institutiones of Gaius. Two thirds of the Institutiones of Justinian consists of literal quotes from Gaius. The new Institutiones were used as a manual for jurists in training from 21 November 533 and were given the authority of law on 30 December 533 along with the Digest.

FOUR UNITS OF ROMAN LAW

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novellae_Constitutiones

The Novellae Constitutiones ("new constitutions"; Latin: Novellæ constitutiones, Greek: Νεαραί διατάξεις), or Justinian's Novels, are now considered one of the four major units of Roman law initiated by Roman Emperor Justinian I in the course of his long reign (AD 527–565). The other three pieces are: the Codex Justinianus, the Digest, and the Institutes. Justinian's quaestor Tribonian was primarily responsible for compiling these last three. Together, the four parts are known as the Corpus Juris Civilis. Whereas the Code, Digest, and Institutes were designed by Justinian as coherent works, the Novels are diverse laws enacted after 534 (when he promulgated the second edition of the Code) that never were officially compiled during his reign.[1] (According to Black's Law Dictionary, a translated, unabridged collection of Justinian's Greek Novels is known as Liber Authenticorum.)

FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tenth_Man_(novel)

The story comprises four parts. In Part I, set in prison, the occupying German guards issue a decimation order to the thirty inmates. One of the three chosen by drawing lots is a rich lawyer named Chavel. Chavel becomes hysterical and desperately offers his entire wealth to any man willing to die in his place. A young man, known as Janvier, accepts his offer and is executed.

 

In Part II, the war is over and Chavel is alive and free, but virtually destitute. He returns to the house he sold for his life and finds it occupied by Janvier’s mother and sister, Thérèse. Assuming the false name Charlot, he becomes their servant.

 

Part III sees the arrival of an impostor, named Carosse, who claims to be Chavel. Carosse attempts to denounce Charlot, win the favour of Thérèse and stake a claim on the property.

 

Finally in Part IV, Charlot, having fallen in love with Thérèse, must save her from Carosse, as a means of redemption from his earlier cowardice.

FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stone_Gods_(novel)

A novel in four parts[edit]

"Planet Blue"- set in a futuristic past, where humanity's problematic destruction of its own home-world, Orbus, seems to be fixed when they come across and "terraform" another viable world in outer space.

"Easter Island"- set in the 18th century, a time when Easter Island's inhabitants destroyed many of the moai statues (and the last tree) on their island. The toppling of these statues may suggest the author's opinion of current overbearing corporate and government entities.[original research?]

"Post-3War"- set in "Tech City" after World War Three.

"Wreck City"- set in the same time-space, though moving to a derelict trash city where those abandoned by the corporate-controlled society struggle to live.

FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invisible_(Auster_novel)

Invisible is a novel by Paul Auster published in 2009 by Henry Holt and Company. The book is divided into four parts, telling a continuous story but each section told in a different voice and by several different authors.

CALLED "A TRILOGY IN FOUR PARTS"--- THE FOURTH IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT- ADAPTATION OF FOUR PARTS OF RADIO SERIES- VERY FAMOUS- LIKE THE CONCEPT OF TRINITY V QUATERNITY (SOME PEOPLE SAY QUINTERNITY- THE FOURTH IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT FIFTH ULTRA TRANSCENDENT AND QUESTIONABLE

 

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is the first of five books in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy comedy science fiction "trilogy" by Douglas Adams (with the sixth written by Eoin Colfer). The novel is an adaptation of the first four parts of Adams' radio series of the same name. The novel was first published in London on 12 October 1979.[2] It sold 250,000 copies in the first three months.[3]

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hitchhiker%27s_Guide_to_the_Galaxy_(novel)

 

The novels are described as "a trilogy in five parts", having been described as a trilogy on the release of the third book, and then a "trilogy in four parts" on the release of the fourth book. The US edition of the fifth book was originally released with the legend "The fifth book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhiker's Trilogy" on the cover. Subsequent re-releases of the other novels bore the legend "The [first, second, third, fourth] book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhiker's Trilogy". In addition, the blurb on the fifth book describes it as "the book that gives a whole new meaning to the word 'trilogy'".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hot_Zone

The book is in four sections:

FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Africanus_(novel)

The book is divided into four sections, each organized year by year to describe a key period of Leo Africanus's life, and each named after the city that played the major role in his life at the time: Granada, Fez, Cairo, and Rome. While filled with biographical hypotheses and historical speculations, the book offers a vivid description of the Renaissance world, with the decline of the traditional Muslim kingdoms and the hope inspired by the Ottoman Empire, as it grew to threaten Europe and restore Muslim unity.

FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Vendetta_(novel)

The first edition of La Vendetta was published in April 1830 by Mame et Delaunay-Vallée, appearing immediately after the preface in the first volume of a two-volume collection of Balzac's novels entitled Scènes de la vie privée – Balzac had not yet conceived of La Comédie humaine. The work was divided into a prologue and four sections entitled: L'Atelier, La Désobéissance, Le Mariage and Le Châtiment (The Punishment).

FOUR SECTIONS OF NOVEL EACH BASED ON DIFFERENT FABRIC 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dressmaker_(Ham_novel)
The novel is divided into four sections, each named after a different fabric and representing different phases in the story: gingham, shantung, felt and brocade.[6] Since its release the novel has sold over 75,000 copies[7] and has been translated into a number of languages including German and French.[8]

EACH PART FOUR NARRARATIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Accidental

Set in 2003, the novel consists of three parts: "The Beginning," "Middle" and "The End." Each part contains four separate narrations, one focusing on each member of the Smart family: Eve, the mother, Michael, her husband, Astrid (12) and Magnus (17), two children of Eve’s from a previous marriage (to Adam Berenski). Opening and closing the novel, and between each part, we have four sections of first-person narration from ‘Alhambra’ – who we can assume is Amber, the Smarts' uninvited house-guest.

FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Expanse_(novel_series)

POV/Main Characters[edit]

Further information: The Expanse (novel series) § Narrative Structure

There are two main point-of-view characters in the first book (plus two for the prologue/epilogue) and four main characters for the following four books. In the sixth book, Babylon's Ashes, the number of POV characters jumps to 15, with several only having one or two chapters from their point-of-view.

FOUR SECTIONS

http://gravitys-rainbow.pynchonwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Weisenburger%27s_Companion,_2nd_Edition&oldid=2444

Weisenburger went even farther, noting that these definitions and sources reveal that the novel’s four sections each coincide with key events in the Christian liturgical calendar; moreover, Weisenburger contended, these four sections form a mandala, symbolic of a redeeming wholeness.

STRUGGLE TO SURVIVE BETWEEN FOUR HUMAN SPECIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Irvine

Irvine's most popular series is the Three Worlds fantasy series, comprising The View from the Mirror, The Well of Echoes and The Song of the Tears and selling over a million copies worldwide. The series comprises eleven currently published books set on the three linked worlds of Santhenar, Aachan and Tallallame. The cycle details the struggle for survival between four human species: old humans, Aachim, Faellem and Charon. The View from the Mirror series has also been published in audiobook format.

INTENDED TO BE TRILOGY FOURTH ADDED- FOURTH ALWAYS DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inheritance_(Paolini_novel)

Inheritance is a 2011 novel written by American author Christopher Paolini. It is the fourth novel in the Inheritance Cycle.

 

The Inheritance Cycle was originally intended to be a trilogy, but Paolini has stated that during writing, the length of Brisingr grew, and the book was split into two parts to be published separately. Because of this, many plot elements originally intended for Brisingr are in Inheritance.[2]

THE COMPLETE EDDITION ADDED A FOURTH PART TO THE STORY- THE FOURTH PART IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT- THE FOURTH PART WAS ORIGINALLY NOT PUBLISHED ADDED LATER- FOURTH ALWAYS DIFFERENt

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Livingston_Seagull

Jonathan Livingston Seagull, written by Richard Bach, is a fable in novella form about a seagull learning about life and flight, and a homily about self-perfection. It was first published in 1970 as "Jonathan Livingston Seagull — a story." By the end of 1972, over a million copies were in print, Reader's Digest had published a condensed version, and the book had reached the top of the New York Times Best Seller list, where it remained for 38 weeks. In 1972 and 1973, the book topped the Publishers Weekly list of bestselling novels in the United States. In 2014 the book was reissued as Jonathan Livingston Seagull: The Complete Edition, which added a 17-page fourth part to the story.

 

Plot

1.1 Part one

1.2 Part two

1.3 Part three

1.4 Part four

 

Part four[edit]

In 2013 Richard Bach took up a non-published fourth part of the book which he had written contemporaneously with the original. He edited and polished it and then sent the result to a publisher. Bach reported that it was a near-death experience which had occurred in relation to a nearly fatal plane crash in August 2012, that had inspired him to finish the fourth part of his novella.[1] In February 2014, the 138-page Bach work Illusions II was published as a booklet by Kindle Direct Publishing. It also contains allusions to and insights regarding the same near-death experience. In October 2014, Jonathan Livingston Seagull: The Complete Edition, was reissued and includes part four of the story.

16 CHAPTERS FOUR PARTS- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faith_and_Health:_Psychological_Perspectives

Faith and Health: Psychological Perspectives is a book of scientific psychology on the relationship between religious faith and health. Edited by Thomas G. Plante and Allen C. Sherman, the book was published in the United States in 2001.[1]

 

The book includes 16 chapters divided among four major parts that focus on general population outcomes (such as impacts on longevity), outcomes in special populations such as medical patients or adolescents, clinical implications, and overall criticisms and reflections.

 

Faith and Health has been reviewed in several professional journals, including Contemporary Psychology,[2] Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease,[3] and others.[4][5]

 

Contents [hide]

1 Topics covered

2 Reviews and influence

3 See also

4 References

Topics covered[edit]

Faith and Health contains 16 chapters written by various psychological or biomedical researchers, some of them notable. Chapter titles and authors are listed in the table (below, at right). After an introductory chapter, the remaining 15 chapters are divided into four major parts.

PARADISE REGAINED IS FOUR BOOKS LONG- PARADISE LOST IS 12- THAT IS 16 BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradise_Regained

The poem is four books long, in contrast with Paradise Lost's twelve; 2,065 lines long, while Paradise Lost comprises 10,565. As such, Barbara K. Lewalski has labelled the work a "brief epic."

DYLAN THOMAS AND THE NUMBER FOUR--- THOMAS ORGANIZED 7 AS FOUR PLUS THREE- I POSTED THE JUNGIAN BOOK THAT DISCUSSED HOW IN MYTHOLOGY SEVENS ARE PRETTY MUCH ALWAYS DIVIDED AS FOUR PLUS THREES WITH THE FOURTH BEING DIFFERENT--- HOPEFULLY SOMETIME GO BACK INTO TIMELINE AND FIND THAT BOOK

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

quadrant

HE TALKS ABOUT HOW THE OGLALA AMERINDIAN TRIBE BELIEVES IN FOUR BY FOUR - 16 GODS- EVEN THE ISRAELITES/ANCIENT CANNANITES HAD FOUR TIERS OF GODS I DESCRIBED THERE ARE MANY TRIBES THAT BELIEVE IN THE FOUR BY FOUR 16 GODS- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

Quadrant

TALKS ABOUT THE FOUR LETTERS AND THE DIALECTIC BETWEEN THE QUADRUPLE AND THE TRIPLE IN MOBY DICK- I POSTED A LONG TIME AGO BOOKS DISCUSSING THE SAME THING IN DIFFERENT ULTRA FAMOUS BOOKS AND I STUDIED TEACHING COMPANY COURSES AND AT UCSD LITERATURE CLASSES- I FORGET THE NAMES OF THE BOOKS NOW BUT THE MOST FAMOUS BOOKS WERE THE QUADRANT MODEL

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

I DISCOVERED THE QUADRANT MODEL WHEN CONTEMPLATING THE DIALECTIC BETWEEN THREE AND FOUR WHEN I REALIZED FOUR WAS TRANSCENDENT

DANTES FOURFOLD INTERPRETATION- FOUR MESSENGERS OF JOBS TRAVAILS- FIRST FOUR BOOKS OF ODYSSEY (TELEMACHY)- FATHER MAPLES FOUR CHAPTERS FOUR YARNS-- AND A "TETRADIC MOVEMENT IN THE NOVEL MOBY DICK"- TETRA IS FOUR

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

quadrant

HE TALKS ABOUT IN MOBY DICK "ISHMAEL'S RESCUE REQUIRES A SALVATORY INTERMESHING OF THE THREEFOLD AND FOURFOLD, AS WAS FOUND ON QUEEQUEGS COUNTERPANE AND BY IMPLICATION ON HIS TATOOD BODY AND COFFIN- FOUR IS TRANSCENDENT- I DISCOVERED THE QUADRANT MODEL WHEN TRYING TO RECONCILE THE THREE AND THE FOUR AND THEN I READ THE CHAPTER WHEN JESUS WAS CRUCIFIED AND IT HIT ME THE FOUR WAS TRANSCENDENT AND THE FOUR WAS THE CROSS

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

QUUADRANT

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

THE DYNAMIC OF THREE AND FOUR MOBY DICK INDIAN TASHTEGO AND THE AFRICAN DAGOO FOUR COLORS RED BLACK BROWN RED- COMBAT OF FOUR PRIMORDIAL ELEMENTS CALLS IT A "MARRIAGE OF THE QUADRUPLE AND TRIPLE"

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

quadrant

SPOUTER INN FAMOUS PAINTING DIALECTIC OF TRIPLE AND QUADRUPLE (THAT IS THE QUADRANT NATURE)- TRIADIC AND QUADRUPLE DIALECTIC IN MELVILLES VERY FAMOUS MOBY DICK

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

quadrant

THE POPUL VUH THE MAYAN BIBLE- HAS FOUR BOOKS- HE TALKS ABOUT HOW IT HAS FOUR CREATIONS- QUADRUPLE PATTERN AND HE TALKS ABOUT HOW THE "SEVEN PARROT DRAMA" HAS A FOURFOLD LOGIC- THE MAYA HAVE FOUR WORLDS AND THE FOURTH WORLDS ICON IS A QUATREFOIL- FOUR LOBES

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

quadrant

THE DYNAMIC BETWEEN THREE AND FOUR- I DISCUSSED I DISCOVERED THE QUADRANT MODEL WHILE TRYING TO RECONCILE THREE AND FOUR

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

THE AUTHOR OF THIS BOOK SAYS

"THE TRIPLE HISTORICALLY GAVE WAY TO THE QUATERNAL"- LAWRENCE SAYS "IMAGINATION AND CREATIVITY DEPEND ON FOURFOLD ACTIVITY"- HE DESCRIBED THE FAMOUS THOMAS BOSTON WHO WAS VERY FAMOUS IN HIS TIME "INTIMATED A FOURFOLD KEY TO HUMAN PSYCHOLOGY IN HIS 'HUMAN NATURE IN ITS FOURFOLD STATE OF PRIMITIVE INTEGRITY'"

quadrant

DH LAWRENCE DID WHAT I DID- HE TRIED TO RECONCILE THREE AND FOUR

HE SAID "THREE IS THE NUMBER OF THINGS DIVINE FOUR IS THE NUMBER OF CREATION"- POINTING OUT THAT THE WORLD IS DIVIDED INTO FOUR QUARTERS (a quadrant)

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

Quadrant

I HAD TO READ SIR GAWAINE AND THE GRENE KNIGHT IN HIGH SCHOOL TOO- (I DESCRIBED THAT IT IS  A PART OF ACTUALLY FOUR BOOKS)- I POSTED THIS STUFF A LONG TIME AGO- BUT IT HAS FOUR PARTS BASED AROUND THE FOUR SEASONS AND THE AUTHOR TALKS ABOUT FOUR HEAVILY STRESSED SYLLABLES AND FOUR 'BLOWS'

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

Quadrant

HE TALKS ABOUT HOW FOLWERS EXTREMELY FAMOUS BOOK FOUR THE FAERIE QUEEN "IS THROUGHOUT DEPENDENT UPON THE TETRAD"- HE SAYS "ALLIANCES BETWEEN EVIL CHARACTERS ENGENDER ONLY CARICATURES OF THE FOURFOLD"- HE DISCUSSES THAT MERCURY (MERK DIEZLE) MERKURY WAS THE FOURTH GOD AND WAS REPRESENTED BY THE NUMBER FOUR AND WAS KNOWN AS QUADRATUS DEUS

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

Quadrant

I ALSO HAD TO READ BEOWULF IN HIGH SCHOOL- IT SEEMS LIKE ALL OF THE BOOKS THAT WERE REQUIRED READING IN HIGH SCHOOL ARE QUADRANT PATTERNS

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

BEOWULF HAS LINES OF FOUR STRESSES- THE GREATEST EDAIC POEM (THERE ARE FOUR) VOLOSPA- TENDS TO HAVE FOUR SYLLABLES- GERMAN ROMANTIC LYRIC IS USUALLY FOUR LINE STANZAS FOUR BEAT TROCHEE OF SPANISH DRAMA AND ROMANCES FOUR BEAT RHYMING VERSE OF ROMAN DE LA ROSE- BYRHTFERTH WROTE QUADRANS (QUAD IS FOUR)- tetrapterous- ELUCIDATES FOUR CRITERIA FOUR DECIDING ON EASTER

THE VENERABLE BEDE EXPOUNDED HIS WORK THAT CAME TO BE KNOWN AS "THE PHYSIOLOGICAL FOURS"- CONNECTING THE FOUR HUMOURS FOUR SEASONS AND A LOT OF FOURS--- BYRHTFERTH MANUAL OF 1011 WAS "QUADRIFOLIATE TO THE POINT OF OBSESSION"- OBSESSION WITH FOURS

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

Quadrant

THEON OF SMYRNA CHAPTER "ON THE TETRACKTYS AND THE DECAD'"- TETRA IS FOUR THE TETRACTYS MAKES 10- HE RELATES THE NUMBERS ONE THROUGH FOUR TO THE POINT THE LINE THE SURFACE AND THE SOLID AND TO THE FOUR SIMPLE BODIES--- FIRE PYRAMID, AIR OCTAHEDRON, WATER ICOSAHEDRON, AND EARTH CUBE---- "HE THEN EXTENDS THE QUATERNITY TO LIVING THINGS BEING SEED GROWTH IN LENGTH BREADTH THICKNESS- SOCIEITES- MAN VILLAGE CITY NATION (I DISCUSSED THAT MODERN SOCIOLOGISTS HAVE FOURFOLDS FOR ALL OF THAT IT IS ALL THE QUADRANT MODEL) FOUR AGES OF HUMANITY AND FOUR PARTS OF THE HUMAN BEING (THREE PARTS OF SOUL AND ONE BODY)

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=n9v6Ji0D-qwC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154&dq=four+times+four+gods&source=bl&ots=pjpQHu3S8k&sig=z9-5QIXoQfvOV-62XA53kztYtoU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwix3aiQo9zTAhVos1QKHQy0DE4Q6AEIKDAB#v=onepage&q=four%20times%20four%20gods&f=false

 

QUADRANT

16 BOOKS DIVIDED INTO FOUR PARTS- 16 SQUARES QUADRANT MODEL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxo_Grammaticus

The history is composed of sixteen books and extends from the time of the founders of the Danish people, Dan I of Denmark and Angul into about the year 1187. The first four are concerned with the history of the Danes before Christ, the next four with the history after Christ, books 9-12 Christian Denmark and 13-16 promote Lund and the exploits early before and during Saxo's own lifetime.[12] It is assumed that the last eight books were written first, as Saxo drew heavily on Absalon's testament for evidence of the age of Saint Canute and Valdemar I and Archbishop Absalon died in 1202, before the work was completed.

FOUR STANZAS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailing_to_Byzantium

"Sailing to Byzantium" is a poem by William Butler Yeats, first published in the 1928 collection The Tower. It comprises four stanzas in ottava rima, each made up of eight ten-syllable lines. It uses a journey to Constantinople (Byzantium) as a metaphor for a spiritual journey. Yeats explores his thoughts and musings on how immortality, art, and the human spirit may converge. Through the use of various poetic techniques, Yeats's "Sailing to Byzantium" describes the metaphorical journey of a man pursuing his own vision of eternal life as well as his conception of paradise.

FOUR STANZAS ABAB RHYMES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_1913

"September 1913" is a poem by W. B. Yeats. Perhaps one of his greatest works, September 1913 was written midway through his life as a highly reflective poem which is rooted within the turbulent past. Most notably, the poem provides insight into Yeats' detestation of the middle classes whilst also glorifying figures such as John O'Leary.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Poem

2 Style

3 Key Themes and John O'Leary

4 The Hugh Lane Bequest

5 Dublin Lock-out

6 References

Poem[edit]

What need you, being come to sense,

But fumble in a greasy till

And add the halfpence to the pence

And prayer to shivering prayer, until

You have dried the marrow from the bone;

For men were born to pray and save;

Romantic Ireland's dead and gone,

It's with O'Leary in the grave.

 

Yet they were of a different kind,

The names that stilled your childish play,

They have gone about the world like wind,

But little time had they to pray

For whom the hangman's rope was spun,

And what, God help us, could they save?

Romantic Ireland's dead and gone,

It's with O'Leary in the grave.

 

Was it for this the wild geese spread

The grey wing upon every tide;

For this that all that blood was shed,

For this Edward Fitzgerald died,

And Robert Emmet and Wolfe Tone,

All that delirium of the brave?

Romantic Ireland's dead and gone,

It's with O'Leary in the grave.

 

Yet could we turn the years again,

And call those exiles as they were

In all their loneliness and pain,

You'd cry `Some woman's yellow hair

Has maddened every mother's son':

They weighed so lightly what they gave.

But let them be, they're dead and gone,

They're with O'Leary in the grave.[1]

 

Style[edit]

Unlike some of his earlier work, this poem adopts a new tone and style which expresses a hatred for the Catholic Bourgeoisie.[2][unreliable source?] Yeats' new use of unpleasant adjectives such as 'greasy' is very much indicative of the tone, as he expresses that religion and the middle class are crafty and sly. Moreover, the use of the strong ABAB rhyme scheme maintains a spiteful and accusatory tone.

FOUR BIT 16 POSITIONS- THE PLAY BY SAMUEL BECKETT QUAD FEATURED FOUR ACTORS AND IS DIVIDED INTO 16 TIME PERIODS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_code

For example, a balanced 4-bit Gray code has 16 transitions, which can be evenly distributed among all four positions (four transitions per position), making it uniformly balanced:[20]

 

0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

 

Beckett–Gray code[edit]

Another type of Gray code, the Beckett–Gray code, is named for Irish playwright Samuel Beckett, who was interested in symmetry. His play "Quad" features four actors and is divided into sixteen time periods. Each period ends with one of the four actors entering or leaving the stage. The play begins with an empty stage, and Beckett wanted each subset of actors to appear on stage exactly once.[25] Clearly the set of actors currently on stage can be represented by a 4-bit binary Gray code. Beckett, however, placed an additional restriction on the script: he wished the actors to enter and exit so that the actor who had been on stage the longest would always be the one to exit. The actors could then be represented by a first in, first out queue, so that (of the actors onstage) the actor being dequeued is always the one who was enqueued first.[25] Beckett was unable to find a Beckett–Gray code for his play, and indeed, an exhaustive listing of all possible sequences reveals that no such code exists for n = 4. It is known today that such codes do exist for n = 2, 5, 6, 7, and 8, and do not exist for n = 3 or 4. An example of an 8-bit Beckett–Gray code can be found in Donald Knuth's Art of Computer Programming.[6] According to Sawada and Wong, the search space for n = 6 can be explored in 15 hours, and more than 9,500 solutions for the case n = 7 have been found.[26]

SAMUEL BECKETT PLAY QUAD- FOUR ACTORS FOUR COLORS- FOUR ROTATIONALLY SYMMETRIC PATHS- FOUR SERIES FOUR COURSES- QUADRANTS- FOUR INSTRUMENTS- FOUR MOVEMENTS- FOUR QUADRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quad_(play)

Quad (play)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other uses, see Quad (disambiguation).

Quad is a television play by Samuel Beckett, written and first produced and broadcast in 1981. It first appeared in print in 1984 (Faber and Faber) where the work is described as "[a] piece for four players, light and percussion"[1] and has also been called a "ballet for four people."[2]

 

It consists of four actors dressed in robes, hunched and silently walking around and diagonally across a square stage in fixed patterns, alternately entering and exiting. Each actor wears a distinct colored robe (white, red, blue, yellow), and is accompanied by a distinct percussion instrument (leitmotif). The actors walk in sync (except when entering or exiting), always on one of four rotationally symmetric paths (e.g., when one actor is at a corner, so are all others; when one actor crosses the stage, all do so together, etc.), and never touch – when walking around the stage, they move in the same direction, while when crossing the stage diagonally, where they would touch in the middle, they avoid the center area (walking around it, always clockwise or always anti-clockwise, depending on the production).[3] In the original production, the play was first performed once, and then, after a pause, an abbreviated version is performed a second time, this time in black and white and without musical accompaniment. These are distinguished as Quad I and Quad II, though Quad II does not appear in print.

 

"Beckett’s initial conception … was to have [a pair] of characters walking along Quadrants in all possible paths starting from O (a central origin) and returning to O. But in its final realization almost twenty years later, the mime begins and ends with the void, an empty quad, and travellers deflect their steps away from O."[7]

 

The discarded work was "intended as a mime for two players (son and father or mother) who are described as naked under their coats. The stage is plotted out in a square, the four corners of which (lettered A-D) are to be marked either by two boots and two hats or by four boots, recalling the boots and hat found onstage in Godot;"[8] the mid-points were lettered E-G, and the centre, O.

 

The idea goes back even further however, "indeed Quad may be regarded as the fulfillment onstage of the goal he had set himself in 1937 in the letter to Axel Kaun,[9] the achieving of an entirely new means of expression through the elimination of language."[10]

 

The four series of six stages each produce a total of twenty-four stages suggesting, as in Lessness, the measurement of time.

 

"The fast percussion beats were … removed and the only sounds that were heard were the slower, shuffling steps of the weary figures and, almost inaudibly, the tick of a metronome."[14] The performers now wore identical robes and moved at half the pace. The new section, called Quad II, lasts four minutes as it only allows for one series of movements, compared to the four in Quad I.

 

"As Susan D. Brienza indicates, in … Quad the four characters rhythmically draw mandala pictures that reveal concentric circles and include four quadrants. The dancers’ counter-clockwise pacing evokes Jung’s patient’s leftward movement, which is equivalent to a progress towards the unconscious. They desperately attempt to achieve ‘centering’ and reinstate order and peace, to abolish the separation between the unconscious and the conscious mind."[38]

IT SEEMS LIKE ALL OF THE BOOKS I HAD TO READ IN HIGH SCHOOL FOR CLASS ARE THE QUADRANT MODEL- SCARLETT LETTER I HAD TO READ AND IT HAD FOUR PARTS FOUR MOVEMENTS (fourth different) AND FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=1gneCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA203&lpg=PA203&dq=four+parts+scarlet+letter&source=bl&ots=Si5LL-1diX&sig=G_kmMB2kLBKoiFhmu73H52yIrY0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwish5mw3t_TAhVE6mMKHUvDAicQ6AEIUzAJ#v=onepage&q=four%20parts%20scarlet%20letter&f=false

Quadrant

IT SEEMS LIKE ALL OF THE BOOKS I HAD TO READ IN HIGH SCHOOL FOR CLASS ARE THE QUADRANT MODEL- SCARLET LETTER I HAD TO READ AND IT HAD FOUR PARTS FOUR MOVEMENTS (fourth different) AND FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=1gneCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA203&lpg=PA203&dq=four+parts+scarlet+letter&source=bl&ots=Si5LL-1diX&sig=G_kmMB2kLBKoiFhmu73H52yIrY0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwish5mw3t_TAhVE6mMKHUvDAicQ6AEIUzAJ#v=onepage&q=four%20parts%20scarlet%20letter&f=false

Quadrant

M SCOTT PECK IS EXTREMELY FAMOUS- HIS MOST FAMOUS WORK IS DIVIDED INTO FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._Scott_Peck

The Road Less Traveled,[9] published in 1978, is Peck's best-known work, and the one that made his reputation. It is, in short, a description of the attributes that make for a fulfilled human being, based largely on his experiences as a psychiatrist and a person.

 

The book consists of four parts. In the first part Peck examines the notion of discipline, which he considers essential for emotional, spiritual, and psychological health, and which he describes as "the means of spiritual evolution". The elements of discipline that make for such health include the ability to delay gratification, accepting responsibility for oneself and one's actions, a dedication to truth, and "balancing". "Balancing" refers to the problem of reconciling multiple, complex, possibly conflicting factors that impact on an important decision—on one's own behalf or on behalf of another.

 

In the second part, Peck addresses the nature of love, which he considers the driving force behind spiritual growth. He contrasts his own views on the nature of love against a number of common misconceptions about love, including:

 

that love is identified with romantic love (he considers it a very destructive myth when it is solely relying on "feeling in love"),

that love is related to dependency,

that true love is linked with the feeling of "falling in love".

Peck argues that "true" love is rather an action that one undertakes consciously in order to extend one's ego boundaries by including others or humanity, and is therefore the spiritual nurturing—which can be directed toward oneself, as well as toward one's beloved.

 

In the third part Peck deals with religion, and the commonly accepted views and misconceptions concerning religion. He recounts experiences from several patient case histories, and the evolution of the patients' notion of God, religion, atheism—especially of their own "religiosity" or atheism—as their therapy with Peck progressed.

 

The fourth and final part concerns "grace", the powerful force originating outside human consciousness that nurtures spiritual growth in human beings. In order to focus on the topic, he describes the miracles of health, the unconscious, and serendipity—phenomena which Peck says:

 

nurture human life and spiritual growth,

are incompletely understood by scientific thinking,

are commonplace among humanity,

originate outside the conscious human will.

He concludes that "the miracles described indicate that our growth as human beings is being assisted by a force other than our conscious will" (Peck, 1978/1992,[9] p281).

 

Random House, where the then little-known psychiatrist first tried to publish his original manuscript, turned him down, saying the final section was "too Christ-y." Thereafter, Simon & Schuster published the work for $7,500 and printed a modest hardback run of 5,000 copies. The book took off only after Peck hit the lecture circuit and personally sought reviews in key publications. Later reprinted in paperback in 1980, The Road first made best-seller lists in 1984 – six years after its initial publication.[8]

PECKS' FOUR DISCIPLINES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._Scott_Peck

Discipline[edit]

In The Road Less Traveled,[9] Peck wrote of the importance of discipline. He described four aspects of discipline:

 

Delaying gratification: Sacrificing present comfort for future gains.

Acceptance of responsibility: Accepting responsibility for one's own decisions.

Dedication to truth: Honesty, both in word and deed.

Balancing: Handling conflicting requirements. Scott Peck writes of an important skill to prioritize between different requirements – bracketing.

FOUR NARRATIVE POEMS- FOUR INTERPOLATED TALES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lalla-Rookh

Lalla Rookh is an Oriental romance by Thomas Moore, published in 1817. The title is taken from the name of the heroine of the frame tale, the daughter of the 17th-century Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. The work consists of four narrative poems with a connecting tale in prose.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Overview

2 Adaptations

3 Legacy

4 References

5 External links

Overview[edit]

The name Lalla Rookh or Lala-Rukh (Persian: لاله رخ‎‎ lâle rox), means "tulip cheeked" and is an endearment frequently used in Persian poetry.[2]

 

Engaged to the young king of Bukhara, Lalla Rookh goes forth to meet him, but falls in love with Feramorz, a poet from her entourage. The bulk of the work consists of four interpolated tales sung by the poet: "The Veiled Prophet of Khorassan" (loosely based upon the story of Al-Muqanna), "Paradise and the Peri", "The Fire-Worshippers", and "The Light of the Harem". When Lalla Rookh enters the palace of her bridegroom she swoons away, but revives at the sound of a familiar voice. She awakes with rapture to find that the poet she loves is none other than the king to whom she is engaged.[3]

FOUR BY FOUR LINES
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Cross_(Hezekiah_Jones)
"Black Cross" (AKA "Hezekiah Jones", after the main character) is a poem by Joseph Simon Newman, published in his 1948 collection It Could Be Verse!.[1][2]

Hezekiah was a poor black farmer, who worked his two acres of land; but, he also saved up for and read books. The white folks thereabouts thought him harmless enough, but that "reading ain't no good for an ignorant nigger". Reverend Green, of the white man's church, visited him and asked if he believed in the Lord, the church, and Heaven. Hezekiah replied, that he'd never seen the Lord; that the church was divided; and that he tried to be as good as he could without expecting anything from Heaven or the Lord.

"You don't believe nothin'," said the white man's preacher.
"Oh yes I do," said Hezekiah,
"I believe that a man should be beholding to his neighbor
Without the reward of Heaven or the fear of hell fire."

“Well, there's a lot of good ways for a man to be wicked!"
And they hung Hezekiah as high as a pigeon,
And the nice folks around said, "Well, he had it comin'
'Cause the son-of-a-bitch didn't have no religion!"[2]

ROOD IS CRUCIFIX- CRUCIFIX IS QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dream_of_the_Rood

The Dream of the Rood is one of the earliest Christian poems in the corpus of Old English literature and an example of the genre of dream poetry. Like most Old English poetry, it is written in alliterative verse. Rood is from the Old English word rod 'pole', or more specifically 'crucifix'. Preserved in the 10th century Vercelli Book, the poem may be as old as the 8th century Ruthwell Cross, and is considered one of the oldest works of Old English literature.

 

The poem is set up with the narrator having a dream. In this dream or vision he is speaking to the Cross on which Jesus was crucified. The poem itself is divided up into three separate sections: the first part (ll. 1–27), the second part (ll. 28–121) and the third part (ll. 122–156).[9] In section one, the narrator has a vision of the Cross. Initially when the dreamer sees the Cross, he notes how it is covered with gems. He is aware of how wretched he is compared to how glorious the tree is. However, he comes to see that amidst the beautiful stones it is stained with blood.[10] In section two, the Cross shares its account of Jesus' death. The Crucifixion story is told from the perspective of the Cross. It begins with the enemy coming to cut the tree down and carrying it away. The tree learns that it is not to be the bearer of a criminal, but instead Christ crucified. The Lord and the Cross become one, and they stand together as victors, refusing to fall, taking on insurmountable pain for the sake of mankind. It is not just Christ, but the Cross as well that is pierced with nails. Adelhied L. J. Thieme remarks, "The cross itself is portrayed as his lord's retainer whose most outstanding characteristic is that of unwavering loyalty".[11] The Rood and Christ are one in the portrayal of the Passion—they are both pierced with nails, mocked and tortured. Then, just as with Christ, the Cross is resurrected, and adorned with gold and silver.[12] It is honoured above all trees just as Jesus is honoured above all men. The Cross then charges the visionary to share all that he has seen with others. In section three, the author gives his reflections about this vision. The vision ends, and the man is left with his thoughts. He gives praise to God for what he has seen and is filled with hope for eternal life and his desire to once again be near the glorious Cross.[13]

CYNEWULF HAD FOUR SIGNED POEMS- THIS ONE HELENA FINDS THE TRUE CROSS- CROSS IS QUADRANt

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elene

Elene is a poem in Old English, that is sometimes known as Saint Helena Finds the True Cross. It was translated from a Latin text and is the longest of Cynewulf's four signed poems.

 

On the seventh day he cries out that he cannot take the torture any longer and will reveal where the cross is. He leads the queen to the hill where Jesus was crucified.

IT IS FOUR BY FOUR LINES- 16 LINES- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossing_the_Bar

"Crossing the Bar" is an 1889 poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. It is considered that Tennyson wrote it in elegy; the poem has a tone of finality and the narrator uses an extended metaphor to compare death with crossing the "sandbar" between river of life, with its outgoing "flood", and the ocean that lies beyond [death], the "boundless deep", to which we return.

 

Words to the poem[edit]

Sunset and evening star,

And one clear call for me!

And may there be no moaning of the bar,

When I put out to sea,

 

But such a tide as moving seems asleep,

Too full for sound and foam,

When that which drew from out the boundless deep

Turns again home.

 

Twilight and evening bell,

And after that the dark!

And may there be no sadness of farewell,

When I embark;

 

For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place

The flood may bear me far,

I hope to see my Pilot face to face

When I have crost the bar.

CROSS IS A QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_the_Southern_Cross

Flag of the Southern Cross is a poem written in 1887 by Australian bush poet Henry Lawson. The "Flag of the Southern Cross" refers to the Eureka Flag flown at the Eureka Rebellion in Ballarat, Victoria in 1854. A copy of the poem can found at http://www.ironbarkresources.com/henrylawson/FlagOfTheSouthernCross.html.

 

The victory song of the Australian cricket team—Under the Southern Cross I Stand—is said to have been inspired by this poem.[1]

FOUR LINES- CROSS IS A QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_the_Southern_Cross_I_Stand

"Under The Southern Cross I Stand" is the victory song of the Australian cricket team.

 

It is typically sung by the players in the style of a raucous chant[1] after every victory and "treated with reverential consideration and respect" within the team.[2] The official lyrics are as follows, though when it is sung by the players, the word "little" in the last line is replaced by "fucking".[3]

 

Under the Southern Cross I Stand

A sprig of wattle in my hand,

A native of my native land,

Australia you little beauty.[4]

 

The authorship of this "Under the Southern Cross I Stand" is credited to former wicketkeeper Rod Marsh, who was apparently inspired by Henry Lawson's 1887 poem, "Flag of the Southern Cross".[2] Marsh initially had the role of leading the team in singing it, and on his retirement he passed it on to Allan Border. The other players to have taken on the role are David Boon (when Border took over the captaincy), Ian Healy (on Boon's retirement), Ricky Ponting (on Healy's retirement), Justin Langer (when Ponting took over the captaincy), and Michael Hussey (on Langer's retirement). Hussey has now passed it on to Nathan Lyon upon his retirement in January 2013.[5]

FOUR NOVELS- FOUR ARMED CREATURES- ALSO CRUCIFORMS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperion_Cantos

The resurrection creche can regenerate someone carrying a cruciform from their remains. Treeships are living trees that are propelled by ergs (spider-like solid-state alien being that emits force fields) through space.

 

The Hyperion Cantos is a series of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. The title was originally used for the collection of the first pair of books in the series, Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion,[1][2] and later came to refer to the overall storyline, including Endymion, The Rise of Endymion, and a number of short stories.[3][4] Within the fictional storyline, the Hyperion Cantos is an epic poem written by the character Martin Silenus.[5]

 

Of the four novels, Hyperion received the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1990;[6] The Fall of Hyperion won the Locus and British Science Fiction Association Awards in 1991;[7] and The Rise of Endymion received the Locus Award in 1998.[8] All four novels were also nominated for various science fiction awards.

 

The Shrike[edit]

The region of the Tombs is also the home of the Shrike, a menacing half-mechanical, half-organic four armed creature that features prominently in the series.[12] It appears in all four Hyperion Cantos books and is an enigma in the initial two; its purpose is not revealed until the second book, but even then left somewhat nebulous. The Shrike appears to act both autonomously and as a servant of some unknown force or entity. In the first two Hyperion books, it exists solely in the area around the Time Tombs on the planet Hyperion. Its portrayal is changed significantly in the last two books, Endymion and The Rise of Endymion. In these novels, the Shrike appears effectively unfettered and protects the heroine Aenea against assassins of the opposing TechnoCore.

CRUCIFORMS- CROSS SHAPED CREATURES--- CROSS IS QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperion_(Simmons_novel)

Shortly thereafter, Tuk is murdered and Duré stumbles into the nearby Bikura village. The Bikura are an unintelligent people, incapable of grasping most concepts but who believe Duré is "of the cross" (due to his wearing a crucifix) but not "of the cruciform". After many weeks, Duré steals into their sacred cavern and discovers a finely wrought cross-shaped artwork that predates human spaceflight by millennia. He deduces that they are survivors from a seedship crash centuries earlier who have been infected with cross-shaped organisms called cruciforms that integrate themselves into their host. After death, the cruciform rebuilds the physical body and resurrects them. The price of immortality is that resurrection information is lost, and over time they become unintelligent and androgynous, losing all distinguishing features. When he is seen topless while bathing the Bikura discover he has no cruciform on him. Debating killing him they instead lead him into Hyperion's labyrinth system where he encounters the Shrike and is unknowingly infected with a cruciform.

 

After discovering the truth, Duré attempted to cut the cruciform out of his body but failed. Next he attempted to flee the village but after traveling only a few kilometers from the village the cruciform inflicted extreme pain to keep him near. Father Hoyt, immediately sets to return to Hyperion, having experienced only a few weeks of travel in his reference frame, but his "time debt" means seven years have passed and he finds Father Duré's remains there, burnt and decomposing in the flame forest. Hoyt tells the other pilgrims that some of his guides on that expedition died by accident and the rest nuked the village and the story ends.

 

When the time comes to leave the treeship Hoyt is late. The consul finds him in his stateroom in immense pain, his "ultra-morphine" auto-injector having failed. The consul promises to assist Hoyt in return for hearing the true story. Hoyt reveals in a final desperate act, Duré crucified himself to a tesla tree with his journal wrapped in flame proof cloth. For seven years, Father Duré had been continually electrocuted and resurrected by the cruciform, never allowed to die. As Hoyt touches it, the cruciform falls from Duré's body and this allows him to finally die the "true death" and be at peace. Also revealing that his guides did not die by accident they were actually murdered by the Bikura and Hoyt was spared as, like Duré, he wore a crucifix. In retaliation the entire Bikura village was destroyed with shaped nuke charges but not before Hoyt is fitted with both a cruciform of his own and also with the cruciform that was implanted into Duré.

EXTREMELY POPULAR- MEANS FOUR LEAF CLOVER AND HAS FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Čtyřl%C3%ADstek

Čtyřlístek

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Čtyřlístek

 

Author Jaroslav Němeček draws character Pinďa

Publication information

Format Children's

Publication date(s) 1969 to present

No. of issues 600 (as of 1 January 2016)

Čtyřlístek (Lucky Four or English: Four-leaf clover) is a Czech comic book series continuously published since 15 May 1969[1] created by Jaroslav Němeček.[2] In the 1980s an average edition contained about 220 000 prints and became one of the most popular comic books for children.

 

Plot[edit]

The comic has four main characters - Myšpulín, a geeky cat; Bobík, a tough pig; Fifinka, a pretty dog, and Pinďa, a silly rabbit. They live in the same house in the small fictitious village of Třeskoprsky, somewhere near Podbezdězí.

DIES IN CRUCIFORM POSE- CRUCIFORM STREET

 

File:The Coyote Gospel (last page).jpg

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Coyote_Gospel_(last_page).jpg

Cruciform

IT SAYS X IS REPRESENTATION OF DEATH AND REBIRTH IN KABALLAH AND THE CRUCIFIX

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_(manga)

The title of "X" was chosen because it has no fixed meaning. In mathematics, it is a common variable. Beyond mathematics, "X" is a generic placeholder whose value is secret or unknown. "X" is also a cruciform, an allusion to Christian mythos, and the representation of death and rebirth in Kabbalah.[10][12]

FOUR ARCHETYPAL STEREOTYPICAL GIRLS

http://www.hrwiki.org/wiki/Teen_Girl_Squad

Teen Girl Squad is a purposefully crudely drawn comic series, drawn on notebook paper, which centers around four stereotypical teenage girls' quest to become popular and to look "SO GOOD!", or so they say. Of course, they never appear to succeed due to being always on a different track. Its origins began in the Strong Bad Email comic, when a girl named Brittany asked Strong Bad to make a comic strip about her four friends. Strong Bad's spur-of-the-moment comic soon became a series of its own; the Brothers Chaps have also admitted to using it as an outlet for new female characters. In each issue, the blandly named girls — Cheerleader, So and So, What's Her Face, and The Ugly One — perform typical teenage activities, such as going to the mall, attracting cute boys, or babysitting, but Strong Bad's overactive imagination often subjects the girls to strange and gruesome deaths. Being killed doesn't seem to be a problem for the girls, however, as they always return for the next issue, or sometimes simply later in the episode. The two most popular gags in the series are the girls' catchphrase, "SO GOOD!", and the onomatopoeia used when a character dies — -'d, for example: "Lathe'd!", used to describe What's Her Face's being killed by spinning near a blade. Another common gag involves the girls exclaiming something in the format Ow! My X! to express pain in an unorthodox area, such as "my most of me" or "my style".

CRUCIFORM QUADRANT MANUSCRIPT

https://quadriformisratio.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/pantocrator.jpg

Fig. 361 – A Pantocrator Lectionary with texts in the shape of a cross. Greek minuscule, eleventh century. British Library; Department of Manuscripts; Add. 39603, f. 1b. In: GAUR (1984/1992).

 

The ‘western’ or Latin notion of the cross – as expressed by Augustine in his book ‘De doctrina Christiana‘ and the ‘Sermones‘ (LIII & CLXV) – does not emphasis the geometry, but strengthens the topology (stating the place) of the moral and mental order. The cross represents, in his view, the four invisible dimensions in the human mind to love.

 

The distinction between an ‘eastern’ and ‘western’ cross, however, is an invention of an interpretative, dualistic mind, and is often not in accordance with the views or intentions of the artists at the time.

 

In the Celtic cultural heritage, for instance, are many examples of ‘eastern’ motifs (fig. 362). Some scholars, like STRZYGOWSKI (1923), were inclined to imply a direct influence from the east (including Egypt). GINHART (1971) distinguished within the large number of sculptured crosses and ornaments in Central Europe – from the eighth and ninth century – a ‘Carolingian’ and a ‘Langobardian’ branch.

 

It can be deceitful to speak of geographical influences in this field. More remarkable is the fact, that during this period – from Ireland to Spain and into the Balkans, with the Longobards of Northern Italy as a spider in the web – representations of the cross showed such a similar form and shape (fig. 363). It is better to regard these ornamentations as being part and parcel of a genuine, reemerging ‘European’ culture.

VERY FAMOUS 16 CHAPTERS 4 BY 4- 16 INTERLOCKING STORIES- I DESCIRBED I WATCHED TEACHING COMPANY COURSES AND OTHER STUFF THAT SHOWED THE QUADRANT PATTERN IN AMAZING WAYS IN PAINTINGS I CANT REMEMBER NOW IN BOOKS I CANT REMEMBER NOW IN INCREDIBLE WAYS- FOR THE MOST FAMOUS PAINTINGS AND BOOKS- IF I HAD A DVD PLAYER ESPECIALLY ONE THAT PLAYED FAST MOTION HOPEFULLY I CAN WATCH THEM AND HOPEFULLY I CAN GET MORE DVDS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Joy_Luck_Club_(novel)

 

The Joy Luck Club is a 1989 novel written by Amy Tan. It focuses on four Chinese American immigrant families in San Francisco who start a club known as The Joy Luck Club, playing the Chinese game of mahjong for money while feasting on a variety of foods. The book is structured somewhat like a mahjong game, with four parts divided into four sections to create sixteen chapters. The three mothers and four daughters (one mother, Suyuan Woo, dies before the novel opens) share stories about their lives in the form of vignettes. Each part is preceded by a parable relating to the game.

 

The Joy Luck Club consists of sixteen interlocking stories about the lives of four Chinese immigrant mothers and their four American-born daughters.[1] In 1949, the four mothers meet at the First Chinese Baptist Church in San Francisco and agree to continue to meet to play mah jong. They call their mah jong group the Joy Luck Club. The stories told in this novel revolve around the Joy Luck Club women and their daughters. Structurally, the novel is divided into four major sections, with two sections focusing on the stories of the mothers and two sections on the stories of the daughters.

BRONTE WROTE FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_Brontë

Novels[edit]

Jane Eyre, published in 1847

Shirley, published in 1849

Villette, published in 1853

The Professor, written before Jane Eyre, was first submitted together with Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë and Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë. Subsequently, The Professor was resubmitted separately, and rejected by many publishing houses. It was published posthumously in 1857

THE RIDDLE OF THE SPHINX- HIGHEST NUMBER - NUMBER FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oedipus

Continuing his journey to Thebes, Oedipus encountered a Sphinx, who would stop all travelers to Thebes and ask them a riddle. If the travelers were unable to answer her correctly, they would be killed and eaten; if they were successful, they would be free to continue on their journey. The riddle was: "What walks on four feet in the morning, two in the afternoon and three at night?". Oedipus answered: "Man: as an infant, he crawls on all fours; as an adult, he walks on two legs and; in old age, he uses a 'walking' stick". Oedipus was the first to answer the riddle correctly and, having heard Oedipus' answer, the Sphinx allowed him to carry on forward.

FOUR CHILDREN OEDIPUS HAS WITH HIS MOM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oedipus

Queen Jocasta's brother, Creon, had announced that any man who could rid the city of the Sphinx would be made king of Thebes, and given the recently widowed Queen Jocasta's hand in marriage. This marriage of Oedipus to Jocasta fulfilled the rest of the prophecy. Oedipus and Jocasta had four children: two sons, Eteocles and Polynices (see Seven Against Thebes), and two daughters, Antigone and Ismene.

FOUR FOOTED FAMOUS RIDDLE OF SPHINX

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oedipus

The Bibliotheca, a Roman-era mythological handbook, includes a riddle for the Sphinx, borrowing the poetry of Hesiod:

 

What is that which has one voice and yet becomes four-footed and two-footed and three-footed?[15]

FOUR PRINTED WHILE ALIVE

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Austen

Only four of her novels were printed while she was alive. They were Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816)

FOUR PUBLISHED NOVELS WHILE ALIVE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Jane_Austen

Jane Austen (16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics. Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry. She was educated primarily by her father and older brothers as well as through her own reading. The steadfast support of her family was critical to her development as a professional writer. Her artistic apprenticeship lasted from her teenage years into her thirties. During this period, she experimented with various literary forms, including the epistolary novel which she tried then abandoned, and wrote and extensively revised three major novels and began a fourth. From 1811 until 1816, with the release of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer.

UNUSUAL TO HAVE FOUR GENERATIONS IN OLD TESTAMENT- FOUR IS TRANSCENDENT

https://claudemariottini.com/2010/05/26/zephaniah-the-prophet/

The four-generation genealogy found at the beginning of the book traces Zephaniah’s lineage back to Hezekiah. The genealogy introducing the ministry and message of Zephaniah says:

 

“The word of the LORD that came to Zephaniah son of Cushi son of Gedaliah son of Amariah son of Hezekiah, in the days of King Josiah son of Amon of Judah” (Zephaniah 1:1).

NOVEL FOUR FIRST PERSON NARRATIVES FOUR PARTS- NOVEL FOUR PARTS EACH WITH DIFFERENT NARRARATOR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Nostradamus!

The novel is told in four parts, each with a different narrator and focus.

 

Hey Nostradamus! is a novel by Douglas Coupland centred on a fictional 1988 school shooting in suburban Vancouver, British Columbia and its aftermath. This is Coupland's most critically acclaimed novel. It was first published by Random House of Canada in 2003. The novel comprises four first-person narratives, each from the perspective of a character directly or indirectly affected by the shooting. The novel intertwines substantial themes, including adolescent love, sex, religion, prayer and grief.

 

The novel is told in four parts, each with a different narrator and focus.

FOUR MAJOR PLOT LINES ABOUT FOUR AMERINDIAN ELDERS WHO ESCAPE FROM MENTAL HOSPITAL- FOUR DIFFERENT STORIES OF CREATION

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Grass,_Running_Water

At this, the unknown narrator begins to explain the escape of four Native American elders from a mental institution who are named Lone Ranger, Ishmael, Robinson Crusoe, and Hawkeye. The elders are each connected with a female character from native tradition: First Woman and the Lone Ranger, Changing Woman and Ishmael, Thought Woman and Robinson Crusoe, and Old Woman and Hawkeye. The book then divides into four main sections: each of these sections is narrated by one of the four elders.

 

In addition to these four explaining the "ordinary" events, they each tell a creation story that accounts for why there is so much water. In each creation story, the four encounter a figure from the Bible of Judeo-Christian tradition, as well as the western literary figures from whom each derives his name.

 

The book has four major plot lines. One follows the escape and travels of the elders and Coyote, who are out to fix the world. Dr Joseph Hovaugh and Babo, his assistant, try to track down the elders. Dr. Hovaugh keeps track of every time the elders have gone missing; he attributes major events, such as the volcanic eruption of Mount St Helens, to their disappearances. The second plot line follows Lionel Red Dog, Charlie Looking Bear and Alberta. The third plot line follows Eli Stands Alone, Lionel's uncle, who lives in his mother's house in the spillway of the Balene Dam. The fourth plot line involves characters from Christian and Native American creation myths and traditions, as well as literary and historical figures including Ahdamn, First Woman, the Young Man Who Walks on Water, Robinson Crusoe, Nasty Bumpo and so on.

 

The structure of the novel is quite unique; the narrator of the story is identified as "I." This character is a companion of Coyote, and knows the four escaped Aboriginal men personally. The unknown narrator is told the plot of the novel by each of the four in turn. This means that the reader hears the story through the unknown narrator, who heard the story from all of the four escaped Aboriginal men, who separately tell the story to the denizens of Blossom. To further complicate the narrative structure, the unknown narrator is telling this story not directly to the reader, but primarily to Coyote.

 

Interspersed in the four sections of the novel are four different stories of the creation, as told by four timeless Aboriginal women/gods: First Woman, Changing Woman, Thought Woman, and Old Woman.[5] In each of these retellings, each woman meets both a figure from the Bible as well as a western literary figure, from whom she takes on a new name: Lone Ranger, Ishmael, Robinson Crusoe, and Hawkeye, respectively.[5] These timeless women become the four "Indian Men" who escape the asylum, thus echoing the Trickster's ability to change genders.

FOUR NOVELS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Berrybender_Narratives

The Berrybender Narratives is a series of novels written by Larry McMurtry. It tells the story of an ill-fated hunting expedition lasting several years and covering much of the early American West. As with much of McMurtry's Western fiction, it weaves a tale of bloody adventure with a sort of ghastly dark humor.

 

The four novels in the series, with publication dates, are:

 

Sin Killer (2002)

The Wandering Hill (2003)

By Sorrow's River (2003)

Folly and Glory (2004)

FOURTH WALL FOURTH TRANSCENDENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_wall

The fourth wall is a performance convention in which an invisible, imagined wall separates actors from the audience. While the audience can see through this "wall", the convention assumes, the actors act as if they cannot. From the 16th century onwards, the rise of illusionism in staging practices, which culminated in the realism and naturalism of the theatre of the 19th century, led to the development of the fourth wall concept.[1][2]

CRUCIFIED IN POEM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crucified_Soldier

A French zouave is crucified by German uhlans in the poem "Jean Desprez" (from Rhymes of A Red Cross Man)[14] by Robert W. Service, published in 1916.

CRUCIFIED SOLDIER

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crucified_Soldier

The Crucified Soldier refers to the widespread atrocity propaganda story of an Allied soldier serving in the Canadian Corps who may have been crucified with bayonets on a barn door or a tree, while fighting on the Western Front during World War I. Three witnesses said they saw an unidentified crucified Canadian soldier near the battlefield of Ypres, Belgium on or around 24 April 1915, but there was no conclusive proof such a crucifixion actually occurred. The eyewitness accounts were somewhat contradictory, no crucified body was found, and no knowledge was uncovered at the time about the identity of the supposedly crucified soldier. During World War II the story was used by the Nazis as an example of British propaganda.

SONNETT 133 SHAKESPEARE ALLUSION TO CHRISTS CRUCIFIXION- THE CROSS- SAYS CROSS IN SONNETT 44 ALSO

http://www.shmoop.com/sonnet-133/crucifixion-imagery.html

ALLUSION TO CHRIST'S CRUCIFIXION

BACK NEXT

Symbol Analysis

At one point in the sonnet, our speaker's dramatic way with words conjures up an image of Christ's crucifixion. Wait. Why the heck would he do that in a poem about some torrid love triangle? Because he wants to give us a vivid sense of his suffering and torment, that's why. But, even though we get a clear sense of the guy's pain, we might also begin to think of him as a martyr here (if we haven't already) and we wonder just how effective the biblical allusion really is.

 

Lines 7-8: This is where the speaker says that being "forsaken" (abandoned) by his mistress and his BFF is a "torment" that must be "crossed" (thwarted or prevented from happening). Hmm. The words "forsaken," "torment," and "crossed" sort of jump out at us and make us wonder if this guy actually thinks his pain and suffering are worse than the crucifixion of Christ. So, we take another look and realize that… yep, dude really is comparing getting cheated on to being crucified.

Like we've said before, the word "crossed" has the word "cross" in it—as in the kind of physical structure that people get nailed or tied to and then left to hang from until they die a very slow and agonizing death.

Then there's the word "forsaken," which shows up in some very famous Biblical accounts of the crucifixion. When Christ feels abandoned he shouts "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mark 15:34).

(And, in case you're wondering, yes, Shakes knew The Bible like the back of his hand.)

Notice how totally casual the speaker is about dropping a crucifixion reference on us? It's as if he thinks it's totally normal for him to just toss out the idea that his steamy love life is some kind of religious event. What's up with that? Does this give us a better sense of his emotional pain and suffering, or does it make us think the guy's a little over-dramatic? Go to "Themes: Suffering" if you want to think about it some more.

P.S. Our speaker makes a similar move in Sonnet 44. Check out how he complains about how bad he feels knowing that his mistress and his friend are hooking up with each other: Both find each other, and I lose both twain, / And both for my sake lay on me this cross (11-12).

BLEEDING TREE IN THE SCARLET IBIS SYMBOLIZES CRUCIFIXION- CRUCIFIX IS CROSS

http://education.seattlepi.com/symbolism-bleeding-tree-the-scarlet-ibis-5772.html

As a bleeding tree, it may also reference the Crucifixion, making it a powerful sign of love and death for Christian families like the

What Is the Symbolism of a Bleeding Tree in "The Scarlet Ibis"?

The scarlet ibis dies in the bleeding tree, alone and far from home.

When recalling the memories that comprise James Hurst's short story "The Scarlet Ibis," the narrator, Brother, notes that a grindstone stands in place of the bleeding tree. Though the tree no longer stands, it nevertheless lives on in his memory. He associates the bleeding tree with both the titular ibis and his younger brother, Doodle.

THE CRUCIFIX CROSS/QUADRANT IN HAMLET- SHAKESPEARE

http://teachers.yale.edu/curriculum/viewer/initiative_08.01.09_u

Trinity, Crucifixion, the Last Supper, Peter's Denial, Judas' Betrayal:

 

Act I. Scene i. L 47-179: At this point, the Ghost has appeared on three different occasions (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit Trinity allusion) and on this third night, as Horatio begs the illusion to stay, the Ghost spreads his arms (crucifixion allusion). The Ghost appears to attempt conversation but then a cock crows in the distance (Peter's denial three times before the cock crowed). Soon after, Marcellus asks if he should strike it with his partisan, in the same manner that Jesus was speared on his left side of his body, out of which flowed holy water (crucifixion allusion). Students need to pay special attention to lines 162-179 because Marcellus explains that the Ghost's presence faded on the crowing of the cock since the rooster has the power to "awake the God of day" and, at his warning, the bad spirit hides away, "like a guilty thing upon a fearful summons", i.e., for shame of committing any more offenses against Jesus, which is also an indirect allusion to Judas' nighttime betrayal of Jesus for pieces of silver, which initiated the crucifixion of Jesus. Marcellus also explains that on Christmas Eve, the rooster crows all night long so that no bad spirits will appear on such a holy night. The rooster, in their eyes, is a symbol of truth; questions should arise in the students' minds as to whether the spiritual integrity of the Ghosts is good or evil.

HAMLET SHAKESPEARE

http://teachers.yale.edu/curriculum/viewer/initiative_08.01.09_u

The Crucifixion

http://teachers.yale.edu/curriculum/viewer/initiative_08.01.09_u

III.iv.19: Hamlet states that "not by the rood" has he forgotten his mother. In archaic usage, the rood is the crucifix.48

 

II.ii. 390; II.ii.55; II.ii.603: Here, the fourth commandment is broken by the uttering of "'Sblood," "'Sbody," and "'Swounds," the former oaths taking Christ's blood and body, i.e. God, in vain; the latter disregarding Christ's crucifixion wounds.

http://www.languageinindia.com/nov2015/songchoromeojulietallusions1.pdf

http://www.languageinindia.com/nov2015/songchoromeojulietallusions1.pdf

11. Juliet: “To move the heavens to smile upon my state, / Which— well thou knowest— is cross and full of sin” (4.3.4-5).

And as they came out, they found a man of Cyrene, named Simon: him they compelled to bear

his cross.

(Matthew 27:32)

ALLUSION CRUCIFIXION

https://carlsonenglish.wikispaces.com/Allusion

Additionally, the descriptions of Santiago Nasar's murder (138-142) suggest an allusion to Jesus Christ's crucifixion. For example, Santiago is described as being propped up against the door of his home by the knife stabs of the Vicario twins, just as Christ was propped up against a cross by piercing wounds. Santiago also receives a wound through the palm of his hand - an area commonly related to Christ's crucifixion. These allusions demonstrate how an allusion can work to enhance themes of the novel - the similarities between Santiago and Christ suggest a sense of martyrdom and injustice to the murder.

CRUCIFIXION

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barabbas_(1961_film)

Barabbas witnesses the crucifixion of Jesus. As Jesus dies, the sky turns black, and Barabbas is shaken. He watches Christ's body sealed in the tomb. On the third morning, Barabbas finds the tomb open and the corpse gone. Rachel tells him that Christ has risen, but Barabbas says it is an illusion, or that his followers have taken the body. He visits the apostles; they do not know where he is, but also believe he is risen.

OWEN CRUCIFIXION- CROSS CHRIST FIGURE CROSS SYMBOL MADE

http://steppingstone9.blogspot.com/2010_07_01_archive.html

This chapter has challenged my views on Owen. In the chapter Owen reveals to John his dream about dying ( Pg 473-474). He tells john that there's an explosion and it cause him to be blown to the ground. When he opens his eyes Owen states that there are Vietnamese children standing around him looking at him in a worried way. A nun then comes and picks up Owens body and begins to do the sign of the cross on him, Owen tries to stop her but nothing happens.. The nun places Owen on a ground and Owen describes how his spirit rose from his body to the point where he could actually see himself.

 

Can Owen be a Christ figure? Many say he can't be because of the accidents that have happened such as him being involved in the deaths of Sagamore and Tabby.Many say God wouldn't use someone who has killed, but there are many stories that disprove that.One of these is that God used Moses after Moses had killed the Egyptian to lead the Israelites out of Egypt.God also used David to kill Goliath. Beyond that, in How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Thomas C. Foster states that a Christ like figure would have some similarities with Jesus -- Owen does.

 

One of the things Owen has in common with Jesus is that both have endure wounds. While Jesus was nailed on the cross, Owen was hit by a grenade that severed both his arms and was killed.Another thing Jesus and Owen had in common are that both their mothers were

virgins at their birth.The third thing they share in common is that they died saving others lives.Though Jesus and Owen share many similarities they also have differences.

 

While Jesus is always portrayed with arms outstretched Owen "with his hands clasped behind his back,he looked as armless as Watahantowet(Irving,pg.69)."

 

In conclusions with these facts in place yes Owen can be portrayed as a Christ figure.

PHINEAS CAGE IN A SEPARATE PEACE ALLUSION TO CRUCIFIXION 

http://steppingstone9.blogspot.com/2010_07_01_archive.html

There is a particular scene in the book that shows that Phineas is our Chris Figure. In the courtroom scene when Brinker was trying to figure out what happened to cause Finny’s fall. In the “courtroom” Finny had a chance of finding out the truth. “Did my best friend purposely jounce the limb?”

 

“Phineas had been sitting motionless, leaning slightly forward, not far from the position in which we prayed at Devon (Knowles 172).” This is similar to Christ praying in the garden before he was crucified. In the garden Jesus was praying to God: “Take this cup from me (Bible).” Jesus prayed that there had to be another way to redeem man kind. When Phineas was in this position he was hoping that he wouldn’t have to reveal his doubts about his best friend. The actions show his relation to being a Christ figure.

 

“After a long time he turned and reluctantly looked at me. I did not return his look or move or speak (Knowles 172.” He looked at gene because he wanted to see it Gene was tired of the courtroom and if they should leave. This is also like Jesus looking to God for an answer as to what he should do. Jesus wanted to find a way around crucifixion and he was praying that God would give him an alternative but God was silent as was Gene.

 

“‘Leper’s here,’ he said in a voice so quiet, and with such quiet unconscious dignity, that he was suddenly terrifyingly strange to me (Knowles 172).” The quote reveals that Finny is trying to redeem Gene, by uncovering the truth.

MY CLASS HAD TO READ A SEPARATE PEACE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL IT HAS FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS AND PHINNEAS IN THE BOOK HAS HIS ARMS OUTSTRETCHED ALLUDING TO THE CRUCIFIX IN CRUCIFIX CROSS QUADRANT POSE

http://steppingstone9.blogspot.com/2010_07_01_archive.html

According to How to Read Literature Like A Professor for a character to be a Christ like figure they have to have some similarities to Jesus. The first reason Phineas is a Christ Figure is that like Jesus, Phineas was in agony. I know this because he says "I have suffered"(Knowles 16). Another similarity to Jesus that Phineas has is that he uses humble modes of transportation. An example of that is when he and Gene went to the beach he used a bike. A third similarity is that Jesus is portrayed with arms outstretched and so was Phineas when "[Phineas] raised his arms invoking the air to support him" on the bridge. Another example that Phineas is like Jesus is that he has disciples which are the people who always follow what he does just like when Phineas invented Blitzkrieg. Gene one of his many disciples betrays him by jouncing the limb which causes Phineas to shatter his leg just like Judas betrayed Jesus by identifying Jesus in public by kissing him which caused Jesus to be arrested by the Romans and later crucified. The fourth example that Phineas is a Christ Figure is the fact that like Jesus, Phineas also was known to spend time in the woods like when Gene found him snowball fighting.(Knowles 86) My final example is that after saving Phineas from his guilt by letting the truth out about how he shattered his leg he dies, just like how Jesus died after saving he saved the world from sin.

THE POEM ALLUDES TO CRUCIFIXION- THE CROSS- THE QUADRANT AND IT IS THREE SECTIONS OF FOUR LINES EACH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_a_Calvary_near_the_Ancre

"At a Calvary near the Ancre" is a poem by Wilfred Owen. It deals with the atrocities of World War I. The Ancre is a tributary of the Somme. It was the scene of two notable battles in 1916.

 

The poem is among those set in the War Requiem of Benjamin Britten, being interleaved with the petitions of the Agnus Dei.

 

It is constructed of three verses of 4 lines each in an abab rhyming scheme:

 

One ever hangs where shelled roads part.

In this war He too lost a limb,

But His disciples hide apart;

And now the Soldiers bear with Him.

Near Golgotha strolls many a priest,

And in their faces there is pride

That they were flesh-marked by the Beast

By whom the gentle Christ's denied.

The scribes on all the people shove

And bawl allegiance to the state,

But they who love the greater love

Lay down their life; they do not hate.

The poem links the Crucifixion of Christ to the battlefield of the First World War. Not only are there allusions to the crucifixion narratives but the Mark of the Beast (Revelation 13: 16). Another allusion which links to the Crucifixion is the crossroads of the first line as a crossroads was a traditional place to hang criminals or display their corpses on gibbets. The political (scribes) and religious (priests) authorities that are encouraging the prosecution of the war are compared to the authorities that caused the Crucifixion. The reference to the Soldiers has a double-meaning here - they echo the Soldiers that mocked Christ (Matthew 27: 27-30, Mark 15: 16-19) but also the soldiers who fight in the war, so they are contrasted with the disciples that deserted Christ so become the ones who stand with Christ in his suffering - even standing as Christ in his passion - having been abandoned by the authorities to fight and die.

TS ELLIOT ALLUSION OF CRUCIFIXION

http://crossref-it.info/articles/13/cross-crucifixion

The crucifixion of Jesus in literature and art

 

Along with the Nativity, the Crucifixion is one of the most frequently depicted Christian scenes in art. It is also referred to in much literature – for example, in T.S. Eliot's poem The Journey of the Magi, where the scholars travelling to find the Christ-Child see a foreshadowing of his death in the form of ‘three trees on the low sky'. In Golding's Lord of the Flies, Simon runs to tell the boys about ‘a dead man on a hill'.

TS ELLIOT THREE TREES ALLUSION OF CRUCIFIXION

http://www.abc.net.au/religion/articles/2010/08/16/2984135.htm

His Magi travel backwards through time, past the scene of suffering at the crucifixion (dimly represented as "three trees on the low sky"), to the baby at Bethlehem.

TS ELLIOT ALLUSION TO CRUCIFIXION

http://tseliotsthewasteland.wikia.com/wiki/Line_322-330

T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land Wiki

 

After the torch-light red on sweaty faces

After the frosty silence in the gardens

After the agony in stony places

The shouting and the crying 325

Prison and place and reverberation

Of thunder of spring over distant mountains

He who was living is now dead

We who were living are now dying

With a little patience 330

 

AllusionsEdit

This final section opens with images after Jesus was taken prisoner in the garden of Gethsemane and after the cruxification itself. The “torchlight red on sweaty faces” perhaps indicates t

 

Crucifixion-Jesus-Christ-mormon

Jesus being crucified in the Garden of Gethsemane

he guards who come to take Christ away; the “garden” is Gethsemane; “the agony in stony places” refers to the torture and the execution itself; and “of thunder of spring over distant mountains” describes the earthquake following the crucifixion.

 

AnalysiscEdit

Life and death are linked, their borders blurred at times: “He who was living is now dead / We who were living are now dying / With a little patience.” Eliot emphasizes the chaos and disorganisation of society through the use of juxtaposing images such as "shouting" and "crying" and "prison" and "palace." "We who were living are now dying" here portrays the processes of birth, death and rebirth. In this stanza, Eliot is trying to say that society is slowly dying

ISLE OF THE CROSS (CROSS IS A QUADRANT) POSSIBLE LOST BOOK OF MELVILLE WHO WROTE MOBY DICK

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_the_Cross

"Isle of the Cross" (c. 1853) is a possible unpublished and lost work by Herman Melville, which would have been his eighth book, coming after the commercial and critical failures of Moby-Dick (1851) and Pierre: or, The Ambiguities (1852).[1] Melville biographer Hershel Parker suggests that the work, perhaps a novel, perhaps a story, was what had been known as the "story of Agatha," completed around May 1853. He further suggests that finishing the work showed that Melville had not, as many biographers argued, been discouraged and turned away from fiction.[2]

HARRY POTTER AND THE CRUCIATUS CURSE--- CRUCIATUS MEANS CROSS--- HARRY POTTER IS A CHRIST FIGURE AND HE IS DEPICTED AS CRUCIFIED- THE WORD EXCRUCIATING COMES FORM CROSS- HARRY POTTER IS CRUCIFIED WITH THE CRUCIATUS CURSE- CRUCIO

In fact, they were practised in Hogwarts as part of the curriculum of Dark Arts class under the tutelage of Professor Amycus Carrow: students were required to practise the Cruciatus Curse on other students who earned detention, and the Carrow siblings used it to punish students as they see fit.

 

 

 

ISLE OF THE CROSS (CROSS IS A QUADRANT) POSSIBLE LOST BOOK OF MELVILLE WHO WROTE MOBY DICK

http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Cruciatus_Curse

"Isle of the Cross" (c. 1853) is a possible unpublished and lost work by Herman Melville, which would have been his eighth book, coming after the commercial and critical failures of Moby-Dick (1851) and Pierre: or, The Ambiguities (1852).[1] Melville biographer Hershel Parker suggests that the work, perhaps a novel, perhaps a story, was what had been known as the "story of Agatha," completed around May 1853. He further suggests that finishing the work showed that Melville had not, as many biographers argued, been discouraged and turned away from fiction.[2]

 

The Cruciatus Curse (also known as the Torture Curse[1]) (Crucio) is a tool of the Dark Arts and one of the three Unforgivable Curses. It is one of the most powerful and sinister spells known to wizardkind. When cast successfully, the curse inflicts intense, excruciating pain on the victim.

 

Middle Ages

"The Cruciatus, Imperius and Avada Kedavra Curses were not made unforgivable until 1717."

—Albus Dumbledore[src]

The Cruciatus Curse was invented during the early Middle Ages, by dark witches or wizards. The curse was created for torture purposes but has also been used effectively in duels. According to Barty Crouch Jr, the curse was once very popular.

 

After the Wizards' Council was reformed into the Ministry of Magic tighter restrictions were placed on the use of certain kinds of magic. The Cruciatus Curse was deemed by the Ministry to be dark magic, and, along with the Imperius and Killing curses, were declared "unforgivable" in 1717. The use of any of these three curses on a fellow human being would result in a life sentence in Azkaban (unless there was sufficient evidence that the caster did so under the influence of the Imperius Curse or for other defensible reasons)

 

Many Secret Keepers in the past have been subjected to the Cruciatus and Imperius Curses in an attempt to learn the secrets they keep, but to no avail as the Keeper must reveal it willingly.[2]

 

Shortly after Voldemort's defeat, four Death Eaters — three Lestranges: Bellatrix, Rodolphus and Rabastan; along with Barty Crouch Jr — captured the Auror Frank Longbottom and his wife Alice and tortured the two with the Cruciatus Curse for information on Voldemort's whereabouts.

 

Between the wars

"The Cruciatus Curse might loosen your tongue."

—Dolores threatening Harry Potter with the curse[src]

 

Second Wizarding War

"Tell me the truth or, I swear, I shall run you through with this knife! What else did you take, what else? ANSWER ME! CRUCIO!"

—Overheard parts of Bellatrix's interrogation of Hermione Granger[src]

 

Bellatrix brutally interrogating Hermione Granger after subjecting her to the Cruciatus Curse

 

"It was pain beyond anything Harry had ever experienced; his very bones were on fire; his head was surely splitting along his scar… he wanted it to end… to black out… to die."

—Description of Harry Potter under the Cruciatus Curse[src]

Tumblr n1txnsCTSg1qige40o8 250

A spider while under the effects of the curse

The pain caused by the Cruciatus Curse is described as worse than "one thousand white-hot knives, boring into the skin" and beyond what most people will ever experience.[4] The sensation of the curse is so intense that the person under the effects wishes for unconsciousness and even death, as a means of escape. This pain can cause permanent mental injury if exposed to for prolonged time, as in the case of the aforementioned Longbottoms, who spent the rest of their lives in St Mungo's Hospital for Magical Maladies and Injuries because of the trauma the curse caused.[5] Presumably, such permanent effects are not uncommon if the victim is exposed to a particularly intense curse for a long period of time.

 

Closed Ward

Frank and Alice Longbottom are permanent residents in the Janus Thickey Ward for spell damage

As Memory Charms can be broken through torture, the Cruciatus Curse is capable of such a feat, though it requires a certain level of exposure in time and intensity to break through it. Bertha Jorkins suffered such a trial, and the end results was that both her body and mind was damaged beyond repair.[4]

 

Known uses

"Harry shouted, “ Crucio! ” The Death Eater was lifted off his feet. He writhed through the air like a drowning man, thrashing and howling in pain, and then, with a crunch and a shattering of glass, he smashed into the front of a bookcase and crumpled, insensible, to the floor."

—Harry Potter's use of the curse before the Battle of Hogwarts[src]

 

During the Battle of Hogwarts , Voldemort used the Cruciatus Curse on what he believed to be Harry Potter's dead body as a way of dishonouring it and to show he had won. Harry felt no pain because the wand Voldemort used, the Elder Wand , refused to harm its true master. However, Harry's body was tossed around by the force of the spell.[6]

ONE FLEW OVER THE COOKOOS NEST THE CROSS- ENTIRE NOVEL IN CROSS POSITION- CROWN OF THORNS- SUICIDE LIKE JUDAS AFTER CRUCIFIXION

http://www.123helpme.com/assets/16301.html

Foreshadowing clues and images are used to contribute to McMurphy as a figure of Christ. In the beginning of the novel McMurphy is baptized with a shower before entering the ward. The reader is also introduced to Ellis, a character who spends the entire novel in a cross position "nailed against the wall, arms out," (page 20). Another clue to McMurphy's developing character is presented during the electroshock therapy. McMurphy willingly lies down on a cross shaped table, ending up in the same position Ellis foreshadowed. McMurphy also asks for his crown of thorns. Before the therapy a schizophrenic patient approaches him and says "I wash my hands of the whole deal", as Pontius Pilate said to Jesus before sentencing him to death. Jesus was also friends with a prostitute named Mary, just like McMurphy was friends with prostitutes.

 

Finally the actions and feelings of the other characters successfully shows the development of McMurphy as a Christ figure and hero. Clearly smiliarities can be drawn between McMurphy and Jesus' healing. Jesus, made blind men see and mute men speak. McMurphy is the one who prompted the Chief to speak for the first time in years, when he says "Thank-you." (Page 184) and eventually, McMurphy "heals" Chief of his `deafness' and `dumbness'. Billy Bibbit was also aided and empowered by McMurphy. As a disciple however, Billy does not show gratitude and betrays McMurphy claiming "McMurphy did it!" (Page 264) and blaming an entire mess on him. As a result of his betrayal, Billy takes his own life just like Judas did when he gave Jesus to the romans for crucifixion. Even though McMurphy had been betrayed, he still made the ultimate sacrifice to ensure Ratched could not use Billy's death to take away what he had taught the patients and what they had gained. His sacrifice became an inspiration to the other patients and they finally had enough strength where the nurse could no longer "rule with her old power anymore" (page 269).

CRUCIFIXION CROSS IMAGERY

https://prezi.com/ooo7eqgyht3k/one-flew-over-the-cuckoos-nest-christian-imagery/

Transcript of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest: Christian Imagery

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

: Christian Imagery

Crucifixion

“Now he’s nailed like that on the wall in the same condition they lifted him off the table for the last time, in the same shape, arms out, palms cupped, with the same horror on his face. He’s nailed like that on the wall, like a stuffed trophy” (Kesey 16).

“The first hand that comes up, I can tell, is McMurphy’s, because of the bandage where that control panel cut into him when he tried to lift it” (Kesey 140).

Shock Table, EST Machine

“You are strapped to a table, shaped, ironically, like a cross, with a crown of electric sparks in place of thorns. You are touched on either side of the head with wires” (Kesey 69).

UP THE LINE CRUCIFIXION

https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/56721/searching-for-a-short-story-about-the-crucifixion

Your description is a good match for Up the Line, a novel by Robert Silverberg. The Crucifixion flash crowd paradox was addressed directly but no one ever figured out why the expected hordes were not present.

 

Excerpt:

 

I spoke the other day of cumulative audience paradox. This is a severe philosophical problem which has not yet been resolved, and which I will present to you now purely as a theoretical exercise, to give you some insight into the complexities of our undertaking. Consider this: the first time-traveler to go up the line to view the Crucifixion of Jesus was the experimentalist Barney Navarre, in 2012. Over the succeeding two decades, another fifteen or twenty experimentalists made the same journey. Since the com­mencement of commercial excursions to Golgotha in 2041, approximately one tourist group a month—or 100 tourists a year—has viewed the scene. Thus about 1800 individuals of the twenty-first century, so far, have observed the Crucifixion. Now, then: each of these groups is leaving from a different month, but every one of them is converging on the same day! If tourists continue to go up the line at a rate of 100 a year to see the Crucifixion, the crowd at Golgotha will consist of at least 10,000 time-travelers by the middle of the twenty-second century, and --- assuming no increase in the permissible tourist trade --- by the early thirtieth century, some 100,000 time-travelers will have made the trip, all of them necessarily congregating simultaneously at the site of the Passion. Yet obviously no such crowds are present there now, only a few thousand Palestinians --- when I say "now" I mean of course the time of the Crucifixion relative to now-time 2059 --- and just as obviously those crowds will continue to grow in the centuries of now-time. Taken to its ultimate, the cumulative audience paradox yields us the picture of an audience of billions of time-travelers piled up in the past to witness the Crucifixion, filling all the Holy Land and spreading out into Turkey, into Arabia, even to India and Iran. Similarly for every other significant event in human history: as commercial time-travel progresses, it must inevitably smother every event in a horde of spectators, yet at the original occurrence of those events, no such hordes were present! How is this paradox to be resolved?

 

Miss Dalessandro had no suggestions. For once, she was stumped. So were the rest of us. So was Dajani. So are the finest minds of our era.

TIME TRAVELLERS CRUCIFIXION TOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let%27s_Go_to_Golgotha!

Time-travelling tourists go on a "Crucifixion Tour." The tour operator warns the tourists that they must not do anything to disrupt history: specifically, when the crowd is asked whether to spare Jesus or Barabbas, the tourists must all join the call "Give us Barabbas!" (a priest absolves them from any guilt for so doing). However, when the moment comes, the protagonist suddenly realizes that the crowd condemning Jesus to the cross is composed entirely of tourists from the future, and that no actual Jewish Jerusalemites of 33 AD are present at all.

IN THE BOOK THE TIME TRAVELLER GOES BACK IN TIME AND SEES JESUS CRUCIFIXION- CRUCIFIX IS QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_religious_ideas_in_science_fiction

In The Traveller, by Richard Matheson, a confirmed skeptic is chosen to be the first to travel in time to see the crucifixion (in a kind of traveling cage which makes him invisible to the people of the past) and he witnesses the actual event, causing him to feel empathy for Jesus; and is hauled back to the present after attempting to save him; and, although he had seen no miracles, he is a changed man, having seen "a man giving up his life for the things he believed" and stating, "that should be miracle enough for everybody"

PATRICK SUSKIND CRUCIFIXION

http://www.westshore.edu/personal/mwnagle/Wciv/PerfumeAnalysis.htm

The corporeal sacrifice and redemptive reincorporation suggested by this cannibalization is amplified by a cluster of allusions including, most obviously, the Christian crucifixion, as well as the Euripidean dismemberment of Pentheus by the Dionysian maenads, the latter representing the defeat of the rational ego in both the classical text and its postmodern adaptation. Additionally, the image resonates with Kleist's Penthesilea, which also ends with the devouring of a wounded hero (Achilles) in an orally sadistic Liebestod. Reinhabiting ancient and sacred myths, these images of ingestion, communion, and redemption converge with the psychic necessity of introjective Trauerarbeit as a cure for wounded cultural identity. Grenouille's Christian name, Jean-Baptiste, further reinforces the interpretation: John the Baptist preached the gospel of redemption achieved by an identificatory communion performed in the name of the Father.

CRUCIFIXION

https://culturevulture.net/film/perfume-the-story-of-a-murderer/

Adapted from an international bestseller by reclusive Patrick Süskind, Perfume is a German-French-Spanish co-production shot in English. With voice-over by unseen narrator John Hurt, it begins with Jean-Baptiste Grenouille (the heretofore unknown Brit Ben Whishaw) in a dank prison with an irate mob outside ready to rend him to pieces. His sentence is handed down in the form of a slow, torturous crucifixion. The movie then flashes back to see how these events came to be. Grenouille was born with a sense of smell so vast, humanity lacked the language to describe all the aromatic nuances available to him. From the moment of Grenouille’s birth in a fish market, death followed him everywhere like a mystical destiny. His peasant mother is hung for abandoning him, the proprietor of his orphanage is murdered in a theft, and on it goes. Life is valued by Grenouille only insofar as it gives him access to new and more enchanting smells

CRUCIFIXION IMAGERY- CROSS IMAGERY (QUADRANT)-THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/jesuscreed/2015/07/10/santiago-a-christ-figure-by-john-frye/

Crucifixion imagery is the most noticeable way in which Hemingway creates the symbolic parallel between Santiago and Christ. When Santiago’s palms are first cut by his fishing line, the reader cannot help but think of Christ suffering his stigmata. Later, when the sharks arrive, Hemingway portrays the old man as a crucified martyr, saying that he makes a noise similar to that of a man having nails driven through his hands. Furthermore, the image of the old man struggling up the hill with his mast across his shoulders recalls Christ’s march toward Calvary. Even the position in which Santiago collapses on his bed—face down with his arms out straight and the palms of his hands up—brings to mind the image of Christ suffering on the cross. Hemingway employs these images in the final pages of the novella in order to link Santiago to Christ, who exemplified transcendence by turning loss into gain, defeat into triumph, and even death into renewed life.”

The conversation revolves around the word “purposefully”in the Sparks Notes first sentence. I have read that Hemingway himself has affirmed he intended no purposeful religious connections in his novella The Old Man and the Sea. Scot McKnight and I have a ritual of reading TOMATS at least once a year. I have catalogued the religious references in the story and it seems incredulous to me that Hemingway can “beg off”that the religious symbolism was not purposeful. The clincher for me is the reference to the stigmata. Hemingway wrote, “‘Ay,’he [Santiago] said aloud. There is no translation for this word and perhaps it is just a noise such as a man might make, involuntarily, feeling the nail go through his hands and into the wood.”How can this not be a profound, purposeful reference to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ?

Carlos Baker in his book Hemingway: The Writer as Artist makes this observation, “Santiago shows, in his own right, certain qualities of mind and heart which are clearly associated with the character and personality of Jesus Christ in the Gospel stories. There is an essential gallantry, a kind of militance”( 299). Santiago’s humility, formal prayers, and love for the marlin are offered as examples of a Christ-like figure (299-302).

FAULKNER CONSTANT USE OF WORD CRUCIFIXION- CRUCIFIXION ALLUSIONS

http://www.semo.edu/cfs/teaching/4881.html

It is difficult, nearly impossible, to interpret Light in August without noting the Christian parallels.1 Beekman Cottrell explains:

 

As if for proof that such a [Christian] symbolic interpretation is valid, Faulkner gives us, on the outer or upper level of symbolism, certain facts which many readers have noted and which are, indeed, inescapable. There is the name of Joe Christmas, with its initials of JC. There is the fact of his uncertain paternity and his appearance at the orphanage on Christmas day. Joe is approximately thirty-three years of age at his lynching, and this event is prepared for throughout the novel by Faulkner's constant use of the word crucifixion. These are firm guideposts, and there are perhaps others as convincing. (207)

 

If Light in August has enough surface parallels to warrant the claim of a direct parallel in both theme and action to the Gospel of John, then where, in Light in August, is the crucifix, the most important symbol of Christianity?3 Faulkner himself would not have been one to leave out such a significant "tool" in his writing. The "mythical method" which he employed assumes not leaving out important symbols or giving them only small mention, but using them, distorting them even.

 

Faulkner may have been giving us a clue to the way in which he distorted the crucifix in Light in August when he responded to a student at the University of Virginia who directly asked if Faulkner designed any Christ symbolism for the Joe Christmas character. Faulkner altered his typical "carpenter searching for a tool"4 metaphor and commented:

 

No, that's a matter of reaching into the lumber room to get out something which seems to the writer the most effective way to tell what he is trying to tell. And that comes back to the notion that there are so few plots to use that sooner or later any writer is going to use something that has been used. And that Christ story is one of the best stories that man has invented, assuming that he did invent that story, and of course it will recur. Everyone that has had the story of Christ and the Passion as a part of his Christian background will in time draw from that. There was no deliberate intent to repeat it. That the people to me come first. The symbolism comes second. (Gwynn and Blotner 117)

 

Faulkner's comment about "the lumber room" appears conspicuous regarding a novel which contains several wood mills. There is Doane's Mill, and at the planing mill in Jefferson, Lena asks Byron Bunch, "Is there another planing mill?" Byron replies, "No, ma'am. There's some sawmills, a right smart of them, though" (44). Ironically, Faulkner answered the question negatively; he did not intend any Christ symbolism, yet may have been alerting his audience to the way in which he used crucifix imagery from the Gospel. Faulkner identifies Christmas in the above explanation with wood, the sawmill, and the parallel is respective throughout the novel. Christ, of course, is also identified with the wooden manger and cross. Faulkner would not have needed to stray very far from the truth to give the appearance of distorting the imagery presented in the Gospel. Hlavsa has noted, "Biblical scholars say that unlike contemporary representations of the road to Calvary, Jesus probably carried only the crosspiece, a post, which was then affixed to a stationary post" ("The Crucifixion" 129). To distort the myth, Faulkner had only, really, to present the cross as most agree it would have appeared, as a post or post-like object. Other writers, like Cottrell (208), have suggested this, but have not examined it.

 

Repeatedly, images and comparisons foreshadow Christmas' crucifixion by alluding to Christ's "post." Christmas sleeps by a spring, his back to a tree, and he rises, "stretching his cramped and stiffened back, waking his tingling muscles" (96). Later, Christmas walks through the streets of Jefferson, looking "more lonely than a lone telephone pole in the middle of a desert" (99). When chapter 5 closes, Christmas is again sitting with his back to a tree. "When he heard eleven strike tonight he was sitting with his back against a tree inside the broken gate" (103). These post images identify Christmas with the post which Christ carried to Calvary.

 

Lena's last name, Grove, identifies her both with trees and life. The wood from the trees in the grove connects her to the crucifixion imagery, yet a grove of trees has positive connotations: life, peace, quaint order. The fact that she is pregnant further identifies her with life. The peace and life which are suggested by her wooden name clearly relate her to the New Testament where life is emphasized through the story of the rise of man.

 

Although Hightower himself forgets the sign until he sits by his study window, the narration points out that the sign is still "a sign, a message" (51). Hightower's sign is made of wood, signifying his crucifixion of sorts, his spiritual death. He built the sign when he lost his church. Hightower is nearer to Christmas in this sense than perhaps any of the other characters. Ironically, however, Hightower is not even a Christ figure. Rather, he resembles an Old Testament figure more than a New Testament figure. The description of the sign continues:

 

He realizes this himself in chapter 20 where the narrator explains Hightower's past. Hightower sees himself as "a charlatan preaching worse than heresy, in utter disregard of that whose very stage he preempted, offering instead of the crucified shape of pity and love, a swaggering and unchastened bravo killed with a shotgun in a peaceful henhouse... " (428). Hightower preaches the world of his grandfather to his church, the Old Testament world of war, death, honor, "bravo." His wooden sign is the symbol of his separation from the New Testament, the world of the Christmas story which he cannot even spell on his sign. He is even seen as the figure of Satan when his picture is taken behind the hymn book (59).

 

The wood of the sawmill where Byron is introduced in chapter 2 defines Byron's place between the New and Old Testament. The planing mill and its workers belong to the world which will crucify Christmas, an Old Testament world. Having a planing mill in a story where a crucifixion is emphasized through post imagery is perhaps enough to foreshadow a crucifixion, but Faulkner makes the suggestion explicit when "a truck loaded with logs" (43) drives into the planing mill, subtly emphasizing the post imagery which threads Christmas' narrative. Clearly, the mill reflects the world which will crucify Joe Christmas. It is fitting, then, that the mill workers cannot see the importance of Joe Christmas' name, as those who crucified Christ also failed to see his significance. The narration points out, "none of [the workers] had sense enough to recognize" Christmas' name as significant (29). Byron, however, sees that "there was something in the sound of [the name] that was trying to tell them what to expect; that he carried with him his own inescapable warning, like a flower its scent or a rattlesnake its rattle" (29). Thus Byron is set apart from the Old Testament world of the mill and the workers in the setting of the planing mill, a locale scattered with wooden suggestions of a crucifixion.

 

The last chapter of the novel concludes its use of wood imagery. Lena, who has not been a part of Christmas' wooden world, now rides with a furniture repairman, a wooden repairman. The shift to the repairman's point of view, a conspicuous shift at the end of a novel, perhaps suggests that the narration will "repair" or conclude Christmas' crucifixion. And indeed, Lena's and Christmas' stories come together through the wood imagery. Lena looks out from the truck, "watching the telephone poles and the fences passing like it was a circus parade" (444). Christmas has already been referred to as looking "more lonely than a lone telephone pole in the middle of the desert" (99). Typically, Lena's narration does not call attention to poles, planks, or posts of any kind. It is only after Christmas is dead that Lena notices the cross-like images. This would seem to suggest not only that she is perhaps a Virgin Mary figure carrying a Christ figure inside her, but also that she herself is the resurrected "life" after Christ's (Christmas') crucifixion. It seems highly possible in a novel which so skillfully distorts the Crucifix that the process of Christ's death and resurrection could also be distorted. Ironically, however, Lena (life) exists simultaneously with Christmas (death), but never meets him because within the context of the New Testament resurrection comes only after death. In turn, Lena and Christmas never meet because it would be illogical for the Virgin Mary figure to meet her baby while she is carrying her baby. The emphasis at the end of the novel (and the beginning) is undoubtedly on life, suggesting through Lena's attention paid to passing telephone poles that life exists and continues while Christ figures are crucified.

CRUCIFORM TREE IN BOOK

http://www.shmoop.com/death-comes-for-the-archbishop/cruiciform-tree.html

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

One of the first major flashing neon-sign style symbols we see in this book is the cruciform (or "cross-shaped") tree that Father Latour stumbles across while he's lost in the New Mexico desert. Yep. Just count the Biblical references in that statement.

 

Well, there are actually only really two, but hoo-boy are they biggies. The number one is the dang cross shape. The major symbol of Christianity, guys. Father Latour would have very much believed that Christ died on the cross for our sins.

 

Seeing this tree is a big moment of revelation for Latour. If Christ was crucified for the good of mankind, then Latour reasons that the very least he can do for the people of New Mexico is suffer through the wilderness and learn to love his adopted homeland.

 

You also have a Hebrew Bible shout-out: Moses wandered into the wilderness, saw a crazy burning bush, and had God tell him to lead the Israelites out of bondage in Egypt and into freedom. Huh. Latour also is in the (New Mexico) wilderness, and he also sees a crazy plant. So maybe—just maybe— it's time for him to lead the people of New Mexico toward (what Latour would have believed as) the truth of Catholicism. You know, cause the truth will set you free.

 

So Latour's wandering in the desert, followed by ye olde cruciform tree, is a double-whammy of Biblical symbolism. But both arms of this symbol tell us readers (and Latour) the same thing: suffer through New Mexico and you will be given divine guidance.

 

When Latour sees the cruciform tree, he's figuring that he might die of thirst out in the brutal heat. As the narrator tells us:

 

It was not a thick-growing cone, but a naked, twisted trunk, perhaps ten feet high, and at the top it parted into two lateral, flat-lying branches, with a little crest of green in the centre, just above the cleavage. Living vegetation could not present more faithfully the form of the Cross. (1.1.4)

 

Father Latour is looking for any help he can get, so he jumps off his horse and kneels in front of this tree, praying for God to help him. And sure enough, his horses smell water soon afterward and lead him to the house of a Mexican family living nearby. These people treat Latour like gold and give him everything he needs, so Latour decides that God must really be looking out for him in this strange, harsh new land.

CROSS SYMBOLISM IN FRANKENSTEIN

http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/suic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?zid=f35e74276ad1166c515eb08f62255ff0&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CEJ2181700563&userGroupName=lblesd&jsid=6734d22bd813a89ae45158a18b1637d1

During the graveyard/burial scenes the camera focuses, individually, on three striking images—the cross, the crucified Christ and the statue of the figure of death.

 

The cross represents Christ and his sacrifice for mankind; it is 'a mark or sign of Christian religion, the emblem of atonement and the symbol of salvation and redemption through Christianity'. (18) The crucified Christ does not 'mean' anything as a symbol—it is what it is. In this instance it serves to reiterate the symbolism of the cross.

 

The Monster meets the child Maria and she gives him daisies, which were used as a symbol of innocence, of the Christ Child. Maria in her innocence does not see the creature's hideous exterior as monstrous and is the only person to treat him kindly. The Monster, in his innocence and naivete, does not understand the difference between a child and a flower and unwittingly kills her. This is the incident that incites the wrath of the angry mob. The Monster's difference brands him as an outsider and serves to unite the mob against him. The film alludes to The Monster's persecution through the visual cue of the burning arms of the windmill, which are eerily reminiscent of the Klu Klux Klan's burning cross.

SWAMP THING AND JESUS ON THE CROSS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_Thing

With issue #65, regular penciler Rick Veitch took over from Moore and began scripting the series, continuing the story in a roughly similar vein for 24 more issues. Veitch's term ended in 1989 in a widely publicized creative dispute, when DC refused to publish issue #88 because of the use of Jesus Christ as a character despite having previously approved the script in which Swamp Thing is a cupbearer who offers Jesus water when he calls for it from the cross.[8][9] The series was handed to Doug Wheeler, who made the cup that Shining Knight believed to be the Holy Grail to be a cup used in a religious ceremony by a Neanderthal tribe that was about to be wiped out by Cro-Magnons, in the published version of issue #88. Beginning in issue #90, Wheeler reintroduced the Matango that Steve Bissette had introduced in Swamp Thing Annual #4.

FOUR ISSUE ARC FOUR PART ARC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_Thing
With issue #140 (March 1994), the title was handed over to Grant Morrison for a four-issue arc, co-written by the then unknown Mark Millar. As Collins had destroyed the status quo of the series, Morrison sought to shake the book up with a four-part storyline which had Swamp Thing plunged into a nightmarish dream-world scenario where he was split into two separate beings: Alec Holland and Swamp Thing, which was now a mindless being of pure destruction. Millar then took over from Morrison with issue #144, and launched what was initially conceived as an ambitious 25-part storyline where Swamp Thing would be forced to go upon a series of trials against rival elemental forces. Millar brought the series to a close with issue #171 in a finale where Swamp Thing becomes the master of all elemental forces, including the planet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_Thing

The Swamp Thing has appeared in four comic book series to date, plus several specials, and has crossed over into other DC titles. The first Swamp Thing series ran for 24 issues, from 1972 to 1976.

FOUR PART STORYLINE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_Thing_(comic_book)

Grant Morrison[edit]

With issue #140 (March 1994), the title was handed over to Grant Morrison for a four-issue arc, co-written by the then unknown Mark Millar. As Collins had destroyed the status quo of the series, Morrison sought to shake the book up with a four-part storyline which had Swamp Thing plunged into a nightmarish dream world scenario where he was split into two separate beings: Alec Holland and Swamp Thing, which was now a mindless being of pure destruction.

SWAMP THING AND THE CRUCIFIXION

http://www.angelfire.com/pop/bay55/SwampThing/Jesus.html

DC has been reprinting in trade paperback format the SWAMP THING issues which Veitch wrote. On the comicon.com message board, on June 6, 2004, Rick said "I've officially requested that they publish #88 in an upcoming collection (I've offered to fix anything deemed too offensive) and let me finish the Time Travel novel. So far, no final answer from the powers that be." When asked what changes he'd be willing to change, Rick said, "I'm not sure what the modern standards and practices would be.... But right off the top of my head, I'd think we could change it so Jesus isn't named (make him "The Magician" or "The Carpenter" or something like that). And maybe remove the full page crucifixion scene and communion scene.

Honestly, I'm less interested in seeing 88 published than I am in getting a chance to finish the Time Travel story."

 

Russ Heath's Golden Gladiator

 

Was there more than one version of the script? It is widely reported that there was a version with Swamp Thing becoming the very wooden Cross upon which Jesus was crucified, but this may be a misconception based on the proposed cover art seen below. The copy of Veitch's script which I have does not have Swamp Thing becoming a cross. On the other hand, Neil Gaiman's back-up story for SWAMP THING ANNUAL #5 ("Shaggy God Stories") has Woodrue musing about what might have happened in the Jesus story, and he asks if the elemental was the "tree" which Chirst died on.

WOLVERINE CRUCIFIED ON A GIANT X (A QUADRANT)

http://oyster.ignimgs.com/wordpress/stg.ign.com/2013/07/Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_1_251.jpg

http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/11/19/wolverines-darkest-moments

Crucified by the Reavers

 

Uncanny_X-Men_Vol_1_251

As Seen In: Uncanny X-Men #251 (1989)

 

Every so often, the X-Men feel the urge to get out of Westchester and set up new digs somewhere else. In the late '80s, the team temporarily moved to Australia. Wolverine probably regrets the move in hindsight.

 

It was during this period that Claremont first introduced the Reavers, a group of cybernetically-enhanced mercenaries who work for Lady Deathstrike. Deathstrike herself has a powerful grudge against Wolverine, who she views as being a walking perversion of her father's work with adamantium. Uncanny X-Men #251 saw Wolverine captured by the Reavers, crucified on a giant X, and left to suffer in the harsh desert.

THE CHURCH OF HUMANITY CRUCIFIES X MEN (X IS CROSS)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Humanity_(comics)

The Church of Humanity crucified some mutants on the lawn on the X-Mansion including Skin, Magma and Jubilee. Archangel used his healing blood to revive Magma and Jubilee, but, apparently, Skin, among several others didn't have the same luck. The X-Men investigate and find the headquarters of the Church of Humanity.[2]

CRUCIFIXION REFERENCE IN CLOCKWORK ORANGE- CHRIST FIGURE

https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/A_Clockwork_Orange

“Padre, these are subtleties. We’re not concerned with motives, with the higher ethics. We are concerned only with cutting down crime--and. . .with relieving the ghastly congestion in our prisons. He will be your true Christian: ready to turn the other cheek, ready to be crucified rather than crucify, sick to the very heart at the thought even of killing a fly! Reclamation! Joy before the angels of God! The point is that it works.”

IN THE CLOCKWORK ORANGE NOVEL ALEX LIKES TO READ THE BIBLE BECAUSE HE LIKES TO IMAGINE HIMSELF AS ONE OF THE ROMAN SOLDIERS CRUCIFYING CHRIST (alex is himself a Christ figure who is metaphorically crucified)

http://www.novelguide.com/a-clockwork-orange/summaries/part-2-chapter1

However, he does enjoy reading about the crucifixion of Christ, imagining himself as one of the Roman soldiers who whipped Jesus and nailed him on the cross, being dressed “in a like toga that was the heighth of Roman fashion.”

 

The chaplain’s moral lessons, however, are lost on Alex, at least for now. There is some humor here as Alex explains that what he likes best about the Bible is all the sex and violence. When the chaplain asks him to meditate on the divine suffering of Jesus, who died in order to save humanity from sin, Alex fantasizes that he is one of the Roman soldiers who scourged Jesus and nailed him on the cross. He still identifies more with the victimizers than with the ones who suffer. Clearly, Alex doesn’t understand the message of the Bible and Christianity at all.

SPARTACUS ROADWAY CRUCIFIED MEN

http://screencrush.com/disturbing-stanley-kubrick-moments/

'Spartacus' - Roadway lined with crucified men

 

We can only gather that when the brains behind 'Monty Python's Life of Brian' were putting together their sketch for 'Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,' they had this horrid scene from Stanley Kubrick's 'Spartacus' in mind, which features crucified men lining the streets.

 

 

 

Read More: The 10 Most Disturbing Moments from Stanley Kubrick Movies | http://screencrush.com/disturbing-stanley-kubrick-moments/?trackback=tsmclip

Quadrant

CRUCIFORM- CROSS (Quadrant) IMAGERY IN QUENTIN TARANTINO'S HATEFUL EIGHT

https://www.brettmccracken.com/blog/blog/2016/01/01/the-hateful-eight-and-jesus-christ/

Yet beyond this implicit incarnational aesthetic, Jesus Christ does show up explicitly in The Hateful Eight, Tarantino's eighth film. The first shot of the film is a crucifix of Christ, peacefully, mournfully holding vigil amidst the pristine snowy horizon of the amoral western frontier. The shot is doubled later in the film as well, presenting the iconic figure of a crucified Christ as the bookends to a film where nothing is holy and hell is everpresent.

 

Watching the beautiful, snow-caked crucifix in 70mm, framed perpendicularly against a sweeping John Ford horizon, I wondered what exactly Tarantino was wanting this image to mean. As a framing device, was this crucifix simply a irreverent, ironic allusion to the hangman plot of the film, which follows a set of bounty hunters as they seek to deliver an outlaw (Jennifer Jason Leigh) to be hanged? Is the crucifix meant to be an image of tranquility and peace amidst a film that is arguably Tarantino's most violent yet? Perhaps a sign of what has been lost (or forgotten) in the godforsaken, depraved world of the film? Or is the presence of Christ's visage in the film meant to signify the power it can uniquely provide in the uphill battle that is reconciliation?

 

Where does Jesus Christ fit into all this? His crucified visage looms poetically over the whole ugly affair, but to what end? Whether Tarantino intended it to or not, I see in the crucifix the one true hope for reconciliation in a world torn apart by violence, revenge, greed and injustice. In the cross, man has hope of being reconciled to God no matter what he has done, but also hope to be reconciled to his fellow man, despite any dividing walls of hostility that inevitably exist.

HG WELLS FOUR GROUPS OF TOYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floor_Games

Floor Games is a book published in 1911 by H. G. Wells. This light-hearted volume argues in a humorously dictatorial tone that "The jolliest indoor games for boys and girls demand a floor."[1] Illustrated with photographs and drawings, it briefly describes a number of games that can be played on "well lit and airy" floors with "four main groups" of toys: soldiers about two inches high (Wells regrets the "curse of militarism" that makes civilians hard to find), largish wooden bricks, boards and planks,[2] and electric railway rolling stock and rails.[3] Various remarks show that the book is based on Wells's experience of playing such games with his two sons, George Philip "Gip" Wells (1901-1985) and Frank Richard Wells (1903-1982), identified here only by their initials.

HG WELLS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Fourth_Year

In the Fourth Year is a collection H.G. Wells assembled in the spring of 1918 from essays he had recently published discussing the problem of establishing lasting peace when World War I ended. It is mostly devoted to plans for the League of Nations and the discussion of post-war politics.

TRY TO CARVE A CROSS SWASTIKA IN HIS FOREHEAD- SAME THING HAPPENED IN INGLORIOUS BASTARDS

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Father_Callahan

 

They later find and attack Callahan, and carve a cross on his forehead, intending it to become a swastika. But before they can finish the swastika, Callahan is rescued by Calvin Tower and Aaron Deepneau, two men who figure prominently later in Roland's quest. The Hitler Brothers flee, and are later killed by the Low Men. Callahan is later lured into a building by Richard Sayre, a Low Man, and several vampires. Rather than be infected, he jumps out a window committing suicide.

 

Seeing the overwhelming odds against them, Callahan sends Jake on ahead to rescue Susannah while he draws their attention. After dispatching several Low Men and Type Ones, he is goaded to toss away both his cross and the sigul of the turtle (the magical ornament that incapacitates the Low Men). At this point Callahan realizes what he did not understand while facing Barlow in 'Salem's Lot; the power of his faith transcends such objects.

THE ESCAPED COCK NOVEL MAN SURVIVES CRUCIFIXION (cross is the quadrant)- AND AFTER CELEBRATES SENSUALITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Escaped_Cock

Plot summary[edit]

The story is a recasting of the resurrection of Christ narrated in the New Testament. The man who survives his crucifixion comes to celebrate his bodily existence and sensuality. Lawrence himself summarized The Escaped Cock in a letter to Brewster:[citation needed]

 

I wrote a story of the Resurrection, where Jesus gets up and feels very sick about everything, and can't stand the old crowd any more - so cuts out - and as he heals up, he begins to find what an astonishing place the phenomenal world is, far more marvelous than any salvation or heaven - and thanks his stars he needn't have a mission any more.

AHAB MOBY DICK REFERENCE TO CRUCIFIXION nail

http://www.gradesaver.com/moby-dick/q-and-a/imagery-in-moby-dick-81365

Then comes the obscure allusion, centering on Ahab's comparison of himself and his suffering to Christ and His crucifixion. Ahab makes these comparisons through his reference to the Iron Crown of Lombardy. This crown, preserved in a cathedral in the city of Monza in northern Italy, is a jewel-studded wonder. Running around it, inside, is a thin iron band said to have been hammered into its shape from a nail from the cross on which Christ was crucified. St. Helena (AD 248?-328?), the mother of the Roman emperor Constantine I, was said to have found the cross on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. When Ahab notes that he figuratively wears this crown, he is not declaring that he is a holy man. Rather, he is placing himself on the same level as Christ and, at the same time, proclaiming that he carries a Christ-like burden. The passage helps to illuminate his fatal hubris.

AHAB MOBY DICK DESCRIBED AS HAVING AN "INNER CRUCIFIXION"- CROSS IS QUADRANT

http://www.classicfilmfreak.com/2013/11/24/moby-dick-1956-gregory-peck/

Ahab finally appears before the crew as some men are tarring the deck, in daunting aspect—not seen approaching, or emerging from a hatch or in some sort of panning shot up his body, but wholly there, in a sudden full-shot. Ishmael describes him: “Looming straight up and over us, like a solid iron figurehead suddenly thrust into our vision, stood Captain Ahab, his whole, high, broad form weighed down upon a barbaric white leg, carved from the jawbone of a whale. He did not feel the wind or smell the salt air; he only stood staring at the horizon, with the marks of some inner crucifixion and woe deep in his face.”

The Crucifixion Of The Outcast

by William Butler Yeats

https://americanliterature.com/author/william-butler-yeats/short-story/the-crucifixion-of-the-outcast

For learn there is no steadfastness of purpose upon the roads, but only under roofs and between four walls. Therefore I bid you go and awaken Brother Kevin, Brother Dove, Brother Little Wolf, Brother Bald Patrick, Brother Bald Brandon, Brother James and Brother Peter. And they shall take the man, and bind him with ropes, and dip him in the river that he shall cease to sing. And in the morning, lest this but make him curse the louder, we will crucify him.'

 

'The crosses are all full,' said the lay brother.

 

'Then we must make another cross.

https://digitalcrowsnest.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/scarlet-letter-scaffold.jpg

https://digitalcrowsnest.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/a-19th-century-crucifixion/

The crucifixion of Jesus is one of the most recognizable scenes from the Bible. Even those not familiar with religion are still familiar with the symbol of the cross.

 

Hester Prynne is by no means a martyr like Christ but she does radicalize 19th century America by criticizing 17th century Puritan Boston. Nathaniel Hawthorne crucifies Hester in his book, The Scarlet Letter, by putting her on the scaffold in front of the whole town similar to Jesus on the cross. Hawthorne does this to further reinforce Hester as a Christ figure in the story. By doing so he is able to relate her character to a feeling of redemption as well as help the reader understand the sacrifices she goes through. This is also done in an ironic way because Hawthorne is criticizing the Puritans by showing how they treated a Jesus like character in their time period.

GATSBY ALLUSIONS TO THE CROSS- ALSO SOCRATES DIED AFTER "cross examination"

http://www.novelguide.com/reportessay/literature/novels/great-gatsby-4

This interrogation was not dissimilar to that of Jesus, as Jesus remained wholly calm during his rough interrogation- Gatsby remained unfazed and composed during his heated interrogation. When Gatsby died, he went in a similar fashion to that of Jesus. Not by the same method, death on the cross, but by an extremely similar process. ^Gatsby shouldered the mattress and started for the pool. Once he stopped and shifted it a little and the chauffeur asked him if he needed help, but he shook his head and in a moment disappeared among the yellowing trees.^(pg. 169). This imagery is consistent with that of Jesus^ crucifixion. Jesus had been forced to carry his own cross to the place of the crucifixion (on his shoulder), and similarly Gatsby had carried his mattress (on his shoulder) to the place of his death. People had asked Jesus if he needed assistance carrying his cross, and Jesus refused- just as Gatsby had refused aid from his chauffeur. The reason for Gatsby^s death was similar to Jesus^, as well. Gatsby had been killed because George Wilson believed that Gatsby had killed his wife, Myrtle. In reality, Myrtle had been killed by Daisy. Therefore, Gatsby had died for Daisy^s sin.

THE NOVEL SAYS THE A "HAS THE EFFECT OF THE CROSS"- SO HESTER IS CRUCIFIED in a sense

http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/ScholarsForum/MMD1824.html

When the focus returns to Hester in Chapter Thirteen, the gradually more favorable public attitude toward her is attributed to "the blameless purity of her life" throughout her years of repentance. The scarlet letter itself is even said to have "the effect of the cross on a nun's bosom," imparting "to the wearer a kind of sacredness," enabling "her to walk securely amid all peril." The adulteress is like a chaste nun? The "A" for adultery resembles the emblem of the Crucifixion? The early Hathornes would surely have spun in their graves if they could learn of Nathaniel Hawthorne's outrageously ironic analogies.

GATSBY GREAT GATSBY HOLDS OUT ARMS CRUCIFROM- CRUCIFIX POSE

http://crossref-it.info/textguide/the-great-gatsby/34/2438

There are other symbolic and verbal associations:

 

When we first encounter Gatsby, he has his arms outstretched, for the sake of the one he loves (who proves ultimately to cause his death). This might be seen as an echo of the Christian belief that Jesus was motivated by his love for humanity as he held out his arms for his death by crucifixion (Acts 2:23)

GATSBY HOLDS ARM OUT IN CRUCIFORM CROSS POSE- CROSS IS QUADRANT- "curious way"

http://evangelicaloutpost.com/archives/2013/06/seeing-jesus-in-the-great-gatsby.html

In the novel, we first discover Gatsby with both arms outstretched above the water (his barrier to Daisy), in what Nick calls “a curious way” that conjures images of crucifixion. He also dresses in white (symbolizing purity) for his reunion with Daisy. If that’s not enough to convince you, Nick flat-out calls it by making a direct comparison in the text, stating that, in his own context, Gatsby is about his “Father’s business” like a “Son of God.”

THIS IS FASCINATING I WROTE A POEM ON THIS PAINTING FOR SCHOOL IN MIDDLE SCHOOL AND MY WHOLE FAMILY THOUGHT IT WAS UNBELIEVABLE AND WANTED TO GET IT PUBLISHED AND EVEN MY CLASS THOUGHT IT WAS INCREDIBLE-- I MAY HAVE THE POEM SAVED ON A COMPUTER- BUT IN IT MY POEM WAS ABOUT THE WINDOW IN THE BACK AND CHILDREN LOOKING FROM IT WELL THE WINDOW IS CRUCIFORM AND THE PITCHFORK THE FARMER IS CARRYING IS THE TRIDENT CRUCIFORM- ALSO THERE ARE TWO OTHER CRUCIFORM WINDOWS THESE MAY SYMBOLIZE CHRIST CRUCIFIED AND THE TWO THIEVES (who knows maybe the farmers are the crucifiers)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Gothic

quadrant

CONSISTS OF FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auraicept_na_n-Éces

The Auraicept consists of four books,

 

I: The Book of Fenius Farsaidh

II: The Book of Amergin

III: The Book of Fercheirtne Filidh

IV: The Book of Cennfaeladh

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lugh#Areadbhar

Four Treasures Spear of Lugh[edit]

Lugh's spear (sleg), according to the text of The Four Jewels of the Tuatha Dé Danann, was said to be impossible to overcome,[29] taken to Ireland from Gorias (or Findias).[30]

ALTERNATE BETWEEN THREE AND FOUR SYLLABLES- THE DYNAMIC BETWEEN THREE AND FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ynglingatal

Verse forms and text history[edit]

 

The Rök Runestone, the stone that may have inspired the bard who wrote Ynglingatal

Ynglingatal is composed in kviðuháttr (modern Norwegian kviduhått); this genealogical verse form is also used in Son loss (Sonatorrek) in Egils saga.[2] In this form of verse, the lines alternate between three and four syllables—the first line has three syllables, the next has four, the next three, and so on. For example:[3]

 

Ok Vísburs

vilja byrgi

sævar niðr

svelga knátti

FOUR LINE HELMING V EIGHT LINE--- ONE THINKS IT IS FOUR BY FOUR LINES (that the eight is cut into two fours) THE OTHER THINKS IT IS EIGHT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ynglingatal

The Icelandic philologist Finnur Jonsson believed the eight-line stanza defines Ynglingatal's structure, while Walter Akerlund believed the four-line helming—the half-stanza as in the example above—defines the poem's structure.[5] Akerlund has also said the bard Thjodolf learned the verse-form kviðuháttr by studying the Rök Runestone in present-day Sweden, which dates from around the year 800.[6]

THE KINGS DEATHS AND THE FOUR ELEMENTS (I DISCUSSED THE FIRST FOUR DAYS OF GENESIS REPRESENT THE FOUR ELEMENTS IN THE BIBLE AIR WATER EARTH FIRE IN THE QUADRANT PATTERN THEN THE NEXT THREE ARE THE SECOND QUADRANT THE THREE PLUS FOUR PATTERN)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Populaire_wetenschap.PNG

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ynglingatal

As an argument, Krag said the first four kings' deaths represent the cosmology of Greek philosopher Empedocles, with the four classical elements Earth, Water, Air, and Fire, and thus that a euhemeristic vision influenced the description of the first few generations. Krag's perception was captivating and won widespread acclaim.[39]

 

Krag found a literary pattern of elements in the kings' deaths

BOOK CONSISTS OF FOUR QUIRES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ágrip_af_Nóregskonungasögum

The preserved parchment book consists of four quires

BOOK CONSISTS OF FOUR QUIRES- QUIRE IS RELATED TO QUADRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ágrip_af_Nóregskonungasögum

The preserved parchment book consists of four quires

QUIRE MEANS FOURFOLD- THEY HAD 16 SIDES (SIXTEEN SQUARES QUADRANT MODEL) AND WERE CALLED QUATERNIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Units_of_paper_quantity#Quire

The current word "quire" derives from OE "quair" or "guaer", from OF "quayer", "cayer", (cf. modern Fr. cahier), from L. quaternum, "by fours", "fourfold". Later, when bookmaking switched to using paper and it became possible to easily stitch 5 to 7 sheets at a time, the association of "quaire" with "four" was quickly lost.

 

In the Middle Ages, a quire (also called a "gathering") was most often formed of 4 folded sheets of vellum or parchment, i.e. 8 leaves, 16 sides. The term "quaternion" (or sometimes quaternum) designates such a quire. A quire made of a single folded sheet (i.e. 2 leaves, 4 sides) is a "bifolium" (plural "bifolia"); a "binion" is a quire of two sheets (i.e. 4 leaves, 8 sides); and a "quinion" is five sheets (10 leaves, 20 sides). This last meaning is preserved in the modern Italian term for quire, quinterno di carta.

QUARTO IS FOUR TO A SIDE- 16 OF SHAKESPEARES 36 PLAYS WERE QUARTOS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quarto

Quarto (abbreviated Qto, 4to or 4°) is a book or pamphlet produced from full 'blanksheets', each of which is printed with eight pages of text, four to a side, then folded twice to produce four leaves (that is, eight book pages). Each printed page presents as one-fourth size of the full blanksheet.

 

The earliest known European printed book is a quarto, the Sibyllenbuch, believed to have been printed by Gutenberg in 1452–53, before the Gutenberg Bible, surviving only as a fragment. Quarto is also used as a general description of size of books that are about 12 inches tall, and as such does not necessarily indicate the actual printing format of the books, which may even be unknown as is the case for many modern books. These terms are discussed in greater detail in Book sizes.

 

During the Elizabethan era and through the mid-seventeenth century, plays and poems were commonly printed as separate works in quarto format. Eighteen of Shakespeare's 36 plays included in first folio collected edition of 1623, were previously separately printed as quartos, with a single exception that was printed in octavo.[11] For example, Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, the most popular play of the era, was first published as a quarto in 1598, with a second quarto edition in 1599, followed by a number of subsequent quarto editions. Bibliographers have extensively studied these different editions, which they refer to by abbreviations such as Q1, Q2, etc. The texts of some of the Shakespeare quartos are highly inaccurate and are full of errors and omissions. Bibliographer Alfred W. Pollard named those editions Bad quartos, and it is speculated that they may have been produced, not from manuscript texts, but from actors who had memorized their lines.

 

Other playwrights in this period also published their plays in quarto editions. Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, for example, was published as a quarto in 1604 (Q1), with a second quarto edition in 1609. The same is true of poems, Shakespeare's poem Venus and Adonis being first printed as a quarto in 1593 (Q1), with a second quarto edition (Q2) in 1594.

 

In Spanish culture, a similar concept of separate editions of plays is known as comedia suelta.

 

Title page of the first quarto edition of Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, 1600, from the Folger Shakespeare Library[1]

FOUR STRONGLY STRESSED SYLLABLES THE FIRST THREE ALLITERATE THE LAST DOES NOT THE FOURTH IS - DIFFERENT- FOUR LINE STANZASHrynhenda[edit]- FOUR LINES SURVIVE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliterative_verse#Fornyr.C3.B0islag

Hrynhenda is a later development of dróttkvætt with eight syllables per line instead of six, with the similar rules of rhyme and alliteration, although each hrynhent-variant shows particular subtleties. It is first attested around 985 in the so-called Hafgerðingadrápa of which four lines survive (alliterants and rhymes bolded):

 

Mínar biðk at munka reyni

meinalausan farar beina;

heiðis haldi hárar foldar

hallar dróttinn of mér stalli.

I ask the tester of monks (God) for a safe journey; the lord of the palace of the high ground (God — here we have a kenning in four parts) keep the seat of the falcon (hand) over me.

The author was said to be a Christian from the Hebrides, who composed the poem asking God to keep him safe at sea. (Note: The third line is, in fact, over-alliterated. There should be exactly two alliterants in the odd-numbered lines.) The metre gained some popularity in courtly poetry, as the rhythm may sound more majestic than dróttkvætt.

 

We learn much about these in the Hattatal:[12] Snorri gives for certain at least three different variant-forms of hryniandi. These long-syllabled lines are explained by Snorri as being extra-metrical in most cases: the "main" form never has alliteration or rhyme in the first 2 syllables of the odd-lines (i.e., rimes always coming at the fourth-syllable), and the even-lines never have rhyme on the fifth/sixth syllables (i.e.: they cannot harbor rime in these places because they extra-metrical), the following couplet shows the paradigm:

 

Tiggi snýr á ógnar áru

 

(Undgagl veit þat) sóknar hagli.

 

[Note the juxtaposition of alliteration and rhyme of the even-line]

 

 

 

This inscription contains four strongly stressed syllables, the first three of which alliterate on <h> /x/ and the last of which does not alliterate, essentially the same pattern found in much later verse.

 

Another again is that of Thomas Cable, which is based on the idea that each verse contains four syllables, with specific rules for the addition of extra unstressed syllables.[9]

 

After the fifteenth century, alliterative verse became fairly uncommon; possibly the last major poem in the tradition is William Dunbar's superb Tretis of the Tua Marriit Wemen and the Wedo (c. 1500). by the middle of the sixteenth century, the four-beat alliterative line had completely vanished, at least from the written tradition: the last poem using the form that has survived, Scotish Feilde, was written in or soon after 1515 for the circle of Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby in commemoration of the Battle of Flodden.

 

Ljóðaháttr[edit]

Change in form came with the development of ljóðaháttr, which means "song" or "ballad metre", a stanzaic verse form that created four line stanzas. The odd numbered lines were almost standard lines of alliterative verse with four lifts and two or three alliterations, with cæsura; the even numbered lines had three lifts and two alliterations, and no cæsura. This example is from Freyr's lament in Skírnismál:

 

Lǫng es nótt, lǫng es ǫnnur,

hvé mega ek þreyja þrjár?

Opt mér mánaðr minni þótti

en sjá halfa hýnótt.

 

Long is one night, long is the next;

how can I bear three?

A month has often seemed less to me

than this half night of longing.

 

A number of variants occurred in ljóðaháttr, including galdraháttr or kviðuháttr ("incantation meter"), which adds a fifth short (three-lift) line to the end of the stanza; in this form, usually the fifth line echoes the fourth one.

FOUR WORKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliterative_verse#Fornyr.C3.B0islag

The Old High German and Old Saxon corpus of Stabreim or alliterative verse is small. Fewer than 200 Old High German lines survive, in four works: the Hildebrandslied, Muspilli, the Merseburg Charms and the Wessobrunn Prayer. All four are preserved in forms that are clearly to some extent corrupt, suggesting that the scribes may themselves not have been entirely familiar with the poetic tradition. Two Old Saxon alliterative poems survive. One is the reworking of the four gospels into the epic Heliand (nearly 6000 lines), where Jesus and his disciples are portrayed in a Saxon warrior culture. The other is the fragmentary Genesis (337 lines in 3 unconnected fragments), created as a reworking of Biblical content based on Latin sources.

FOUR CHARACTER POEM CHINA NATIONAL ANTHEM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhymed_prose

The style of the National Anthem of the Republic of China follows that of a four-character poem (四言詩), also called a four-character rhymed prose (四言韻文), which first appeared during the Zhou Dynasty. The fu literary form was at first classed with poetry, but later bibliographies classified fu at the head of prose works.[3]

TWO BY TWO GRID QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_characters

The use of such contractions is as old as Chinese characters themselves, and they have frequently been found in religious or ritual use. In the Oracle Bone script, personal names, ritual items, and even phrases such as 受又(祐) shòu yòu "receive blessings" are commonly contracted into single characters. A dramatic example is that in medieval manuscripts 菩薩 púsà "bodhisattva" (simplified: 菩萨) is sometimes written with a single character formed of a 2×2 grid of four 十 (derived from the grass radical over two 十).[9] However, for the sake of consistency and standardization, the CPC seeks to limit the use of such polysyllabic characters in public writing to ensure that every character only has one syllable.[86]

FOUR BOOKS OF THE EDDA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prose_Edda

The four main manuscripts are Codex Regius, Codex Wormianus, Codex Trajectinus and the Codex Upsaliensis.[8]

The Prologue is the first section of four books of the Edda, and consists of an euhemerized Christian account of the origins of Nordic mythology: the Nordic gods are described as human Trojan warriors who left Troy after the fall of that city (an origin similar to the one chosen by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century to account for the ancestry of the British nation, and which parallels Virgil's Aeneid).

FOUR BOOKS OF THE NORSE PROSE EDDA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prologue_(Prose_Edda)

The Prologue is the first section of four books of the Prose Edda, and consists of a euhemerized account of the origins of Norse mythology: the Norse gods are described descended from the Trojans.

FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Peoples_of_Middle-earth

The Peoples of Middle-earth (1996) is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. Some characters (including Anairë, the wife of Fingolfin) only appear here. So too do a few other works that did not fit anywhere else.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Contents

1.1 Part One: The Prologue and Appendices to The Lord of the Rings

1.2 Part Two: Late Writings

1.3 Part Three: The Teachings of Pengoloð

1.4 Part Four: Incomplete Tales

EXTREMELY FAMOUS BOOK TALKED ABOUT A LOT IN MY LITERATURE CLASS IN HIGH SCHOOL- FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS- THE FOUR JUNGIAN ARCHETYPES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_for_Godot

 

An unauthorised sequel was written by Miodrag Bulatović in 1966: Godo je došao (Godot Arrived). It was translated from the Serbian into German (Godot ist gekommen) and French. The playwright presents Godot as a baker who ends up being condemned to death by the four main characters. Since it turns out he is indestructible, Lucky declares him non-existent. Although Beckett was noted for disallowing productions that took even slight liberties with his plays, he let this pass without incident but not without comment. Ruby Cohn writes: "On the flyleaf of my edition of the Bulatović play, Beckett is quoted: 'I think that all that has nothing to do with me.'"[137]

 

 

Beckett directed the play for the Schiller-Theatre in 1975. Although he had overseen many productions, this was the first time that he had taken complete control. Walter Asmus was his conscientious young assistant director. The production was not naturalistic. Beckett explained,

 

It is a game, everything is a game. When all four of them are lying on the ground, that cannot be handled naturalistically. That has got to be done artificially, balletically. Otherwise everything becomes an imitation, an imitation of reality [...]. It should become clear and transparent, not dry. It is a game in order to survive."[63]

 

"The four archetypal personalities or the four aspects of the soul are grouped in two pairs: the ego and the shadow, the persona and the soul's image (animus or anima). The shadow is the container of all our despised emotions repressed by the ego. Lucky, the shadow, serves as the polar opposite of the egocentric Pozzo, prototype of prosperous mediocrity, who incessantly controls and persecutes his subordinate, thus symbolising the oppression of the unconscious shadow by the despotic ego. Lucky's monologue in Act I appears as a manifestation of a stream of repressed unconsciousness, as he is allowed to "think" for his master. Estragon's name has another connotation, besides that of the aromatic herb, tarragon: "estragon" is a cognate of oestrogen, the female hormone (Carter, 130). This prompts us to identify him with the anima, the feminine image of Vladimir's soul. It explains Estragon's propensity for poetry, his sensitivity and dreams, his irrational moods. Vladimir appears as the complementary masculine principle, or perhaps the rational persona of the contemplative type."[70]

 

 

A radical transformation was written by Bernard Pautrat, performed at Théâtre National de Strasbourg in 1979–1980: Ils allaient obscurs sous la nuit solitaire (d'après 'En attendant Godot' de Samuel Beckett). The piece was performed in a disused hangar. "This space, marked by diffusion, and therefore quite unlike traditional concentration of dramatic space, was animated, not by four actors and the brief appearance of a fifth one (as in Beckett's play), but by ten actors. Four of them bore the names of Gogo, Didi, Lucky and Pozzo. The others were: the owner of the Citroën, the barman, the bridegroom, the bride, the man with the Ricard [and] the man with the club foot. The dialogue, consisting of extensive quotations from the original, was distributed in segments among the ten actors, not necessarily following the order of the original."[138]

TREE REPERESENTS CROSS AND CROSS MENTIONED IN PLAY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_for_Godot

Much of the play is steeped in scriptural allusion. The boy from Act One mentions that he and his brother mind Godot's sheep and goats. Much can be read into Beckett's inclusion of the story of the two thieves from Luke 23:39–43 and the ensuing discussion of repentance. It is easy to see the solitary tree as representative of the Christian cross or the tree of life. Some see God and Godot as one and the same. Vladimir's "Christ have mercy upon us!"[73] could be taken as evidence that that is at least what he believes.

 

This reading is given further weight early in the first act when Estragon asks Vladimir what it is that he has requested from Godot:

 

VLADIMIR: Oh ... nothing very definite.

ESTRAGON: A kind of prayer.

VLADIMIR: Precisely.

ESTRAGON: A vague supplication.

VLADIMIR: Exactly.[74]

 

Other explicit Christian elements that were mentioned in the play include, but not limited to, repentance,[75] the Gospels,[76] a Saviour,[77] human beings made in God's image,[78] the cross,[79] and Cain and Abel.[80]

JUNG ANIMA DEVELOPED IN FOUR LEVELS AND ANIMUS FOUR LEVELS- I DESCRIBED I LISTENED TO LECTURES ON JUNG AND MANY OTHER FAMOUS LITERARY PEOPLE AND I CANT REMEMBER THE EXAMPLES NOW BUT THERE WAS SO MUCH QUADRANT MODEL MATERIAL BUT I FORGET THE EXAMPLES NOW HOPEFULLY CAN FIND THEM- BUT JUNG HAD VISIONS ALL FITTING THE QUATERNITY WHERE THE FOURTH PART WAS DIFFERENT AND THERE WAS SOME OTHER VERY FAMOUS LITERARY GUYS GUYS WHO STUDIED LITERATURE AND ALL THEIR STUFF WAS QUADRANT MODEL I FORGET NOW THOUGH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anima_and_animus

Jung believed anima development has four distinct levels, which he named Eve, Helen, Mary and Sophia. In broad terms, the entire process of anima development in a man is about the male subject opening up to emotionality, and in that way a broader spirituality, by creating a new conscious paradigm that includes intuitive processes, creativity and imagination, and psychic sensitivity towards himself and others where it might not have existed previously.[citation needed]

 

Jung stated that there are four parallel levels of animus development in a woman.[3]

 

Man of mere physical power[edit]

The animus "first appears as a personification of mere physical power - for instance as an athletic champion or muscle man, such as 'the fictional jungle hero Tarzan'".[4]

 

Man of action or romance[edit]

In the next phase, the animus "possesses initiative and the capacity for planned action...the romantic man - the 19th century British poet Byron; or the man of action - America's Ernest Hemingway, war hero, hunter, etc."[5]

 

Man as a professor, clergyman, orator[edit]

In the third phase "the animus becomes the word, often appearing as a professor or clergyman...the bearer of the word - Lloyd George, the great political orator".[5]

 

Man as a spiritual guide[edit]

"Finally, in his fourth manifestation, the animus is the incarnation of meaning. On this highest level he becomes (like the anima) a mediator of...spiritual profundity".[6] Jung noted that "in mythology, this aspect of the animus appears as Hermes, messenger of the gods; in dreams he is a helpful guide." Like Sophia, this is the highest level of mediation between the unconscious and conscious mind.[citation needed]

JULIAN OF NORWICH AND THE CRUCIFIED CHRIST

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/Cross-Currents/118880769.html

The theological writings of the fourteenth-century mystic and visionary Julian of Norwich are justifiably renowned for their originality, their elegance, their emphasis on the limitless mercy of an all-loving God, and their description of the maternal aspects of Jesus' character. Any reader of Julian's writings, however, will also be struck by her fascination with the gruesome details of the body of the crucified Christ. While the feminine imagery for Christ and the boundless character of God's love in Julian's writings have received much critical attention, the violence that pervades her texts has not. Here is a representative passage in which Julian describes one of her visions:

 

The vivid details in this passage echo throughout Julian's writings. Moreover, the majority of her visions take the crucified body as their object. In fact, the brutalized body of Jesus serves as the foundational inspiration for Julian's theological musings. Julian states clearly and explicitly that all of her writings relate back to her visions of the Passion of Jesus--to its violence and brutality, to His suffering and pain.

DAVINCI CODE HE IS IN THE POSE OF THE VITRUVIAN MAN WHICH IS A CROSS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Da_Vinci_Code

The Da Vinci Code is a 2003 mystery-detective novel by Dan Brown. It follows symbologist Robert Langdon and cryptologist Sophie Neveu after a murder in the Louvre Museum in Paris, when they become involved in a battle between the Priory of Sion and Opus Dei over the possibility of Jesus Christ having been a companion to Mary Magdalene. The title of the novel refers, among other things, to the finding of the first murder victim in the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, naked and posed similar to Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawing, the Vitruvian Man

THE MAN IN THE DAVINCI CODE WHO WAS MURDERED WHO THE CODE WAS AROUND WAS IN A CRUCIFIED VITRUVIAN MAN POSITION

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t33TPCi4pIQ

Quadrant

DAN BROWN IN HIS BOOK "THE LOST SYMBOL" (he also did The Davinci Code) USES THE 16 SQUARE (QUADRANT MODEL) MAGIC SQUARE OF DURERS PAINTING (I DESCRIBED THAT DURERS BOOKS WERE DIVIEDED INTO FOURS)--- ALL OF THIS STUFF IS IN MY OVER 60 QMR BOOKS

http://www.albrechtdurerblog.com/real-secret-in-the-magic-square/

Anyone who has ever commented on Dürer’s magic square seems to believe that it’s inclusion in this composition has something to do with alchemy or Freemasonry or some occult phenomenon.

 

Dan Brown’s inclusion of Dürer’s magic square as part of the symbol clues in his book the Lost Symbol was fiction. Nothing could be further from the truth.  The Lost Symbol was a great FICTION story but it has done nothing but confuse the real coding that is held in Dürer’s Magic Square.

DAN BROWNS 16 SQUARE CIPHER (16 SQUARES QMR)- IN THE BOOK THE LOST SYMBOL

http://lostsymboltweets.blogspot.com/2009/09/solution-to-puzzle-on-back-cover-lower.html

[Incidentally, for those of you interested in the technical vocabulary and concepts of cryptography, the type of puzzle that we will be working with is a transposition cipher. This means that the letters of the message are all there in plain sight--but they are in a mixed-up order. How can one put them in the correct order? That is the challenge. I think you are seeing cryptographic history made here in The Lost Symbol; I think that forever afterward, this will be called a "magic square" or "Durer" cipher. Read on to see why.]

 

The lower left-hand corner of the back cover has a 4 x 4 grid of letters, like so:

 

Y U O E

M S T D

I I N H

R E K Y

 

This relates to a similar puzzle in The Lost Symbol that Robert Langdon struggles with. At one point, Langdon realizes that the solution to the puzzle is the magic square in the artwork, Melencolia I, produced during the German Renaissance by Albrecht Durer. (Durer was the subject of Clue #9; a reproduction of Melencolia I, magic square and all, is above.) Durer's magic square is a matrix of numbers:

 

16 3 2 13

5 10 11 8

9 6 7 12

4 15 14 1

 

The trick is to put the letters of the first matrix in the order indicated by the numbers of Durer's magic square. The lower right-hand corner of Durer's magic square is 1; this corresponds to the letter "Y" in the letter matrix, so "Y" should go in the first position (where there is already a "Y," no doubt just to confuse us all). But you get the idea. Sort the letters so that they fit into the following matrix of numbers:

 

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16

 

and when you do this, you get the following matrix of letters:

 

Y O U R

M I N D

I S T H

E K E Y

 

which leads to the phrase:

 

"YOUR MIND IS THE KEY."

 

What a powerful statement! But what might it mean, in the context of this book? I think it means two things.

 

Certainly all the many challenges that Robert Langdon has to face in his adventures have to be solved through the use of his mind. In this world, where the forces of irrationality and superstition fight for supremacy, where irrational arguments are used to mold global politics, it is important to remember that our minds are the key.

 

Secondly, the conclusion of the novel, Chapters 133 and the Epilogue (which I will not spoil here), have some interesting things to say regarding the potential of the human mind.

 

Finally, the phrase "YOUR MIND" is almost certainly the key in a Caesar shift cipher (a transposition cipher) using the Freemason's cipher (a substitution cipher) that is another puzzle on the back cover. But that is another blogpost.

 

You can read more about Caesar shift ciphers, transposition ciphers, the Freemasons cipher, and substitution ciphers, in one of my forthcoming books. Australian puzzlemaster Denise Sutherland and I are publishing Cracking Codes and Cryptograms for Dummies in October or November (Wiley Publishing). I'll say more about it in this blog later on, but if you enjoy cryptography, codes, and puzzles, you'll like this book.

 

Now on to that other puzzle on the back cover . . . .

 

[I dedicate the solution of this puzzle to my wonderful wife, Kathleen Koltko-Rivera, who encouraged me to go out to pick up The Lost Symbol tonight, and accompanied me on a lovely nocturnal walk to do so. I love you, sweetheart. L., M.]

16 SQUARE MAGIC SQUARE DAN BROWNS THE LOST SYMBOL- 1234

http://www.dailygrail.com/images/solomon/durer-magic_square.jpg

http://thecryptex.com/features/solving-the-codes-on-the-cover-of-the-lost-symbol

So to start, we have the top-left grid square corresponding to ‘A’. The next two are the top right grid-square featuring a dot: ‘L’; the first word is “ALL”. Continuing on with this deciphering method reveals the statement “ALL GREAT TRUTHS BEGIN AS BLASPHEMIES”, which is a quote from the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, and which applies neatly to many of the topics that Dan Brown discusses in his novels.

 

Lastly, perhaps the most novel cipher technique used by Dan Brown in The Lost Symbol is the grid square which is decoded using the number layout in the ‘magic square of Jupiter’ found in the 1514 engraving Melencolia I, by the Renaissance master Albrecht Dürer. As Dan Brown discusses, adding each row, column, and diagonal in this magic square gives a total of 34 (what a shame that wasn’t 33!).

 

 

 

On the back cover we find there is a grid square containing a number of letters. While again this jumble of letters could be brute-forced if necessary (it baffles Nola Kaye in The Lost Symbol, but in reality no C.I.A. analyst would have any trouble with it at all), Dan Brown explains all in the pages of the book. All that is required is to navigate the grid squares in numerical sequence: in Dürer’s square, the number ‘1’ is at bottom right, so in the corresponding square in the cover cipher we find a ‘Y’. number ‘2’ is third square in the top row, corresponding to ‘O’ in cipher square; ‘3’ equals ‘U’, ‘4’ is “R”. Continuing on, the entire message is revealed: “YOUR MIND IS THE KEY”, which relates well to the content in The Lost Symbol concerning the Ancient Mysteries and Noetic Science.

FOUR COLUMNS

https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-Buddha-Krishna-Lao-Tzu/dp/1571746803

In this fascinating volume, theologian and philosopher Richard Hooper reveals the common spiritual threads of the world's great religious traditions.

 

Hooper organizes hundreds of sayings attributed to Jesus, Buddha, Krishna and Lao Tzu thematically and assembles these parallel sayings into four columns for easy reference. Culled from more than fifty ancient Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and Taoist texts, Jesus, Buddha, Krishna, and Lao Tzu includes topics such as, "The Great Way, "Suffering," and more.

 

Each topic includes an insightful introduction that sends a powerful message that will be welcomed by all who seek the truth within, and within their own spiritual tradition.

SOMEBODY SAID "JUNGS ONLY TRUE GOD WAS THE NUMBER FOUR"- THERE WERE THE FOUR STAGES OF ASCENT OF WOMEN AND MEN- EVE HELEN MARY GNOSTIC SOPHIA AND LAO TZU BUDDHA MANI AND CHRIST

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=c8cABAAAQBAJ&pg=PA475&lpg=PA475&dq=wolfgang+pauli+jung+quaternity&source=bl&ots=ngrRQ3_Feq&sig=cvdBny9w2FQZL-XQGQ0oECT___s&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiB1sr_34LUAhWKllQKHYXKAFQQ6AEIRTAF#v=onepage&q=wolfgang%20pauli%20jung%20quaternity&f=false

QUADRANT

JUNG ON PICASSO FOUR FEMALE FIGURES

http://jungcurrents.com/carl-jung-takes-on-picasso-in-1932

When such a fate befalls a man who belongs to the neurotic, he usually encounters the unconscious in the form of the ‘Dark One,’ a Kundry of horribly grotesque, primeval ugliness or else of infernal beauty. In Faust’s metamorphosis, Gretchen, Helen, Mary, and the abstract ‘Eternal Feminine’ correspond to the four female figures of the Gnostic underworld, Eve, Helen, Mary, and Sophia. And just as Faust is embroiled in murderous happenings and reappears in changed form, so Picasso changes shape and reappears in the underworld form of the tragic Harlequin – a motif that runs through numerous paintings. It may be remarked in passing that Harlequin is an ancient chthonic god.

IN FINNEGANS WAKE JOYCE ADDS A FOURTH STAGE TO VICOS THREE STAGES BECAUSE JOYCE POINTS OUT THAT THE GOSPELS HAS A FOURTH PART THAT IS DIFFERENT AND HE GIVES A TON OF EXAMPLES IN REALITY OF THE TRANSCENDENT FOURTH" SO HE ADDS A FOURTH STAGE TO VICOS THREE STAGES A FOURTH TRANSCENDENT ONE- FINNEGANS WAKE ITSELF WAS FOUR PARTS THE FOURTH DIFFERENT

http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Vico

Giambattista Vico (1668-1744), Neapolitan philosopher, and author of Principi di Scienza Nuova ("The New Science"), in which he developed a cyclic theory of history. The Viconian cycle consists of three recurring phases: (1) the Theocratic or Divine Age of gods, represented in primitive society by the family life of the cave, to which the voice of God (thunder) has driven mankind; (2)the Aristocratic or Heroic Age of heroes, charactized by incessant conflict between the ruling patricians and their subject plebeians; (3) the Democratic Age of people, in which rank and privilege have finally been eradicated by the revolutions of the preceding age. These three ages are typified by the institutions of birth, marriage and burial respectively. In Vico, they are followed by a short period of chaos caused by the collapse of democratric society, which is inherently corrupt. Out of this chaos a new cycle in initiated by the ricorso, or "return", to the Theocratic Age. In FW, Joyce elevated the lacuna between successive cycles into a fourth age: the Chaotic Age. Vico's theory is applied to the image of the history of mankind as depicted in Earwicker's dream. The four phases also symbolize the four evangelists, the four points of the compass and the four provinces of Ireland.

TALKS ABOUT HOW IN JOYCES BOOK THERE IS THE THREE PLUS ONE PATTERN WHERE THE FOURTH OLD MAN IS SEPARATED FROM THE OTHER THREE AND THERE IS MANY INSTANCES OF THIS THREE PLUS ONE QUADRIPARTITE PATTERN IN JOYCES WORK

https://books.google.com/books?id=nEq_OCM7mxYC&pg=PA160&lpg=PA160&dq=joyce+number+four&source=bl&ots=aMmnjak6Ka&sig=cLqHS-arGIMtpiuc6QvGUcXaCA0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjJlr6c5oLUAhXm0FQKHTKqCdAQ6AEIPzAJ#v=onepage&q=four&f=false

Quadrant

JAMES JOYCE REFERENCES THE FAMOUS IRISH TEXT (ANNALS OF THE FOUR MASTERS) THE FOUR MASTERS APPEAR IN DIFFERENT GUISES THROUGHOUT THE WAKE ACCORDING TO THE AUTHOR

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=LoKjFMAhNI0C&pg=PA22&lpg=PA22&dq=finnegans+wake+crucifixion&source=bl&ots=CaOa0YqjIZ&sig=s8PtpxFCZHqHMq5HLtzF2BaAV68&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjV7b2M-4LUAhXLzVQKHWO1BzEQ6AEILTAC#v=onepage&q=four&f=false

Quadrant

FOURFOLD DIVISION OF JAMES JOYCE DUBLINERS

 

Dubliners

 

by James Joyce

 

Home > Dubliners > List of Stories

 

 

There are fifteen stories in Dubliners, however they can be grouped into four divisions

http://members.optusnet.com.au/charles57/Joyce/Dubliners/stories.html

As early as 1905 Joyce had established a four-fold division of three stories each for Dubliners. This structure changed somewhat as the number of stories grew. In the first chronological division, childhood, there are three stories:

 

The Sisters - written in 1904 and first published that same year in the Irish Homestead under Joyce's pseudonym, Stephen Daedalus.

 

An Encounter - written in 1905

 

Araby - written in 1905

 

The second division, adolescence, includes four stories:

 

Eveline - composed in 1904

 

After the Race - also composed in 1904

 

Two Gallants - written in 1905-06

 

The Boarding House - written in 1905.

 

The third group, maturity, consistes of four stories:

 

A Little Cloud - composed in 1906

 

Counterparts - written at the same time as "The Boarding House" in 1905

 

Clay - composed in 1905-06

 

A Painful Case - written in 1905

 

The fourth and last division, public life, consists of:

 

Ivy Day in the Committee Room - written in 1905

 

A Mother - written in 1905

 

Grace - written in 1905

 

The Dead - written in 1906-07.

I POSTED THE BOOK A LONG TIME AGO BY THE GUY WHO SAW THE QUINCUNX SO MUCH IN REALITY AND IN NATURE HE SAID IT HAD TO BE INTELLIGENT DESIGN- THE QUINCUNX IS A CROSS MADE OF FIVE PARTS- JAMES JOYCE REFERENCES THE QUINCUNX IN DUBLINERS AND IT IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CROSS AND CHRISTS CRUCIFIXION

https://books.google.com/books?id=6Jctoxe6lawC&pg=PA29&lpg=PA29&dq=joyce+dubliners+fourfold+division&source=bl&ots=y839OmiFJo&sig=UqQ-2xjqWEkcKt-Wn7Vyh0khK5Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF6ILO_oLUAhWkrVQKHeyPAD8Q6AEILjAC#v=onepage&q=four&f=false

QUADRANT

QUAD IS FOUR DANTE SAW THE QUADRATURE OF THE CIRCLE AS THE ULTIMATE PROBLEM AND SOMETHING THAT IS KNOWN IN HEAVEN- JOYCE ALSO MENTIONS THE QUADRATURE OF THE CIRCLE AS WELL AS THE QUINCUNX (ALL REFERENCING QUADRANTS CROSSES)

https://books.google.com/books?id=6Jctoxe6lawC&pg=PA29&lpg=PA29&dq=joyce+dubliners+fourfold+division&source=bl&ots=y839OmiFJo&sig=UqQ-2xjqWEkcKt-Wn7Vyh0khK5Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF6ILO_oLUAhWkrVQKHeyPAD8Q6AEILjAC#v=onepage&q=four&f=false

Quadrant

THIS IS VERY FASCINATING EXTREMELY FASCINATING--- IN EUCLIDS ELEMENTS EUCLID HAS A QUADRANT MODEL CALLED THE GNOMON WHERE THERE IS THREE SQUARES (rectangles squares are rectangles) AND THERE IS A FOURTH PART THAT IS MISSING- IN JAMES JOYCE DUBLINERS THE GOAL IS TO FILL IN THE LINES THAT WOULD FULFILL THE MISSING SQUARE- THE MISSING FOURTH SQUARE!- THE MISSING FOURTH SEGMENT- THE FOURTH IS ALWAYS TRANSCENDENT

https://books.google.com/books?id=6Jctoxe6lawC&pg=PA29&lpg=PA29&dq=joyce+dubliners+fourfold+division&source=bl&ots=y839OmiFJo&sig=UqQ-2xjqWEkcKt-Wn7Vyh0khK5Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF6ILO_oLUAhWkrVQKHeyPAD8Q6AEILjAC#v=onepage&q=four&f=false

Quadrant

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Derrida

He considers "four guiding threads" of Heideggerian philosophy that form "the knot of this Geflecht [braid]": "the question of the question," "the essence of technology," "the discourse of animality," and "epochality" or "the hidden teleology or the narrative order."[96]

THIS DISCUSSES HOW THE BROTHERS KARAMASOV OF DOSTOYEVSKY IS ABOUT THREE BROTHERS AND A FOURTH- THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT- HE DISCUSSES HOW IT FITS JUNGS QUATERNITY PATTERN THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT THREE PLUS ONE PATTERN --- I FOUND THAT PATTERN INDEPENDENTLY OF JUNG AND I RECOGNIZED THAT THE QUADRANT WAS THE FORM OF THE GOOD THE FORM OF BEING THAT PLATO TALKED ABOUT

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=_cGGDAAAQBAJ&pg=PA117&lpg=PA117&dq=The+Brothers+Karamazov+quaternity+jung&source=bl&ots=QAPyjVHlU6&sig=ZtfAbnOWdXGva2jMiWw7pjShksM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjDs4z3iIPUAhXorlQKHf5ZDSoQ6AEIIzAA#v=onepage&q=The%20Brothers%20Karamazov%20quaternity%20jung&f=false

 

QUADRANT

BOOK IS ABOUT FOUR CHARACTERS RELATED TO THE BOOK OF EZEKIEL RIDERS IN THE CHARIOT TITLE OF BOOK- (I DESCRIBED THE MERKABA IN EZEKIEL- EZEKIELS VISION OF GOD IS FOUR BY FOUR FOUR SETS OF FOUR FACES 16 FACES)- THE CLIMAX OF THE BOOKS IS A CRUCIFIXION OF ONE OF THE FOUR (THE CROSS IS THE QUADRANT)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riders_in_the_Chariot

The novel is the story of the lives of four loosely connected people, whose common link is the mystic experience of the chariot of the title described in the Book of Ezekiel and traces their lives towards the point where they realise they share the same vision.

 

The climax is a mock crucifixion of an old Jewish refugee (one of the four main characters) in the courtyard of the factory where he works. The owner of the factory fears to interfere, and a young aborigine says three times, that he does not know the victim.

 

The main four characters are outsiders with deeply different lives made more difficult because they are religious visionaries. Each experience the same vision of four horses drawing a chariot into a shining future: the fiery chariot from the Book of Ezekiel in the Hebrew bible; visions that make them vulnerable to – and affect the way they deal with – the wily plotting of others.[3]

THE BOOK IS SPLIT INTO FOUR CHAPTERS AND IT ALSO HAS A QUAETERNITY OF CHARACTERS WHERE THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT THE FOURTH DIES MAKING A TRINITY THE FOURTH IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT- JUNG DESCRIBED HOW MANDALAS WERE SEEN THROUGHOUT THE WORLD AND WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR PARTS/ARE QUADRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Solid_Mandala

The book is split into four chapters, each narrated in the third-person omniscient limited style; by far the largest is the second, which is limited to Waldo Brown's point of view. Following this is a chapter told through Arthur Brown's view.

GERHARD DORN SAW THE DILLEMA BETWEEN THE THREE AND THE FOUR AND HE CALLED THE FOUR (DEVILISH)- THE FOUR HORNED SERPANT (YES THE FOUR IS DIFFERENT THE FOURTH SQUARE IS DEATH TRANSFORMATION IT IS THE TRANSCENDENT FOURTH)- HE THOUGHT THE FOUR WAS FEMINE

https://books.google.com/books?id=ESDPPyAf5sYC&pg=PA160&lpg=PA160&dq=arthurs+four+marbles&source=bl&ots=NcK8-rnaMt&sig=-t9QHB79jUMb4g1Iq49XuyKFfIc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjXzPG2jIPUAhWrwFQKHY_YA08Q6AEINjAD#v=onepage&q=quaternity&f=false

QUADRANT

THERE IS THE THREE PLUS ONE AND THE FOUR PLUS ONE FOUR DOMINANT

http://survivorbb.rapeutation.com/viewtopic.php?f=173&t=766&start=20

In Theodor Bar-Kuni the original man is the five elements (i.e., 4 + 1). [37] In the Acts of Thomas, the dragon says of itself: "I am the son ... of him that hurt and smote the four brethren which stood upright." [38]

Ezekiel's vision, the Rex gloriae with the four evangelists, the Gnostic Barbelo ("God in four") and Kolorbas ("all four"); the duality (tao, hermaphrodite, father-mother); and finally, the human form (child, son, anthropos) and the individual personality (Christ and Buddha), to name only the most important of the motifs here used.

QUARTET FIRST FOUR NOVELS- INFLUENCED BY JUNG

https://www.enotes.com/topics/wilson-harris/critical-essays/harris-wilson

The Guyana Quartet is comprised of Harris's first four novels: Palace of the Peacock, The Far Journey of Oudin (1961), The Whole Armour (1962), and The Secret Ladder (1963).

THERE ARE TWO IMPORTANT BEATS IN LITERATURE ONE IS THE FIVE BEATS PER LINE ONE IS FOUR (TETRAMETER) FOUR PRESENTS ITSELF AS DOMINANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iambic_pentameter

Several scholars have argued that iambic pentameter has been so important in the history of English poetry by contrasting it with the one other important meter (tetrameter), variously called “four-beat,” “strong-stress,” “native meter,” or “four-by-four meter.”[4] Four-beat, with four beats to a line, is the meter of nursery rhymes, children’s jump-rope and counting-out rhymes, folk songs and ballads, marching cadence calls, and a good deal of art poetry. It has been described by Attridge as based on doubling: two beats to each half line, two half lines to a line, two pairs of lines to a stanza. The metrical stresses alternate between light and heavy.[5] It is a heavily regular beat that produces something like a repeated tune in the performing voice, and is, indeed, close to song. Because of its odd number of metrical beats, iambic pentameter, as Attridge says, does not impose itself on the natural rhythm of spoken language.[6] Thus iambic pentameter frees intonation from the repetitiveness of four-beat and allows instead the varied intonations of significant speech to be heard. Pace can be varied in iambic pentameter, as it cannot in four-beat, as Alexander Pope demonstrated in his “An Essay on Criticism”:

THERE ARE FOUR BASIC KINDS OF RHYTHM- ALL OF THIS IS IN MY OVER 60 QMR BOOKS

http://personal.strath.ac.uk/t.furniss/firstyearpoetry/32101_7b.htm

3.5 Thus, there are four basic kinds of rhythm:

 

(a) rising duple: one-two, one-two (iambic)

(b) falling duple: one-two, one-two (trochaic)

(c) rising triple: one-two-three, one-two-three (anapestic)

(d) falling triple: one-two-three, one-two-three (dactylic)

THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF MEASURES FOUR BEATS PER LINE AND FIVE BEATS PER LINE (FOUR PRESENTS ITSELF AS DOMINANT I SHOWED WHEN TAKING YOU THROUGH THE TALMUD AND OTHER MYTHOLOGY AND THE HUMAN BODY AND OTHER THINGS THAT OTHER NUMBERS DO PRESENT THEMSELVES WHEN THE FOUR PRESENTS ITSELF AS DOMINANT)

http://personal.strath.ac.uk/t.furniss/firstyearpoetry/32101_7b.htm

6. Metrical poetry: organises the rhythmical units in each line to create a regular pattern.

6.1 In English poetry there are two basic measures: four beats per line (tetrameter), and five beats per line (pentameter) – though there are other metres (eg, three-beat and six-beat).

6.2. To analyse a poem's metre: (i) count total number of syllables per line; (ii) mark and count number of stresses per line; (iii) identify the rhythmic units (e.g., rising duple?) (iv) check to see if the lines follow a four-beat or five-beat pattern.

7. Four-beat metre is the dominant form in popular or oral poetry, found in nursery rhymes, hymns, songs, ballads, pop songs etc. It also features strongly in the literary tradition.

7.1 The four-beat form tends to shape group chanting and songs (as in 'The Lads'):

 

The lads, the lads, away the lads

we are the Boys who make this Noise (1-2).

 

7.2 In songs, the four-beat form is typically reinforced by the musical beat. In The Beatles' 'Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds' (1967), the triple (waltz) rhythm of the verses segues into the duple rhythm of the chorus.

 

7.3 The four-beat form often comes in four-line stanzas and is generally reinforced by end rhymes - as in the first stanza of A.E. Housman's 'Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now' (1896):

 

Loveliest of trees, the cherry now

Is hung with bloom along the bough,

And stands about the woodland ride

Wearing white for Eastertide.

 

7.4 Four-beat poetry may vary between rising and falling metre at beginning of lines, but often resolves into rising at the end (i.e., the last word/syllable in these lines is stressed).

7.5 The number of syllables between beats can vary without destroying the metre: the four-beat form does not always keep to a regular duple or triple pattern.

USES PENTAMETER BUT IN FOUR LINE STANZAS - FOUR PRESENTS ITSELF AS DOMINANT- QUADRANT

http://personal.strath.ac.uk/t.furniss/firstyearpoetry/32101_7b.htm

10.4 Brown (like other modern poets) uses rhymed iambic pentameter in other kinds of poetry, sometimes in four line stanzas:

 

Away, the lads. Your deathless chants will be

heard in these bars and streets long after we

are dead (for lads are mortal too); your sons

will never feel the need for different ones. ('The Lads', 37-40)

FOUR BEATS TETRAMETER IS ENGRAINED IN POPULAR CULTURE

https://scribbledpoetry.wordpress.com/2011/03/11/meter-made/

Tetrameter (4) feels oddly familiar as soon as you start reading or writing it. This is because four beats is so ingrained in popular culture, most pop music is written in common time. If you sat down to write a little poetic ditty, perhaps for a birthday card or a love poem, you’d probably end up writing it with four beats, it just feels good (like spaghetti on naked flesh… um… just me?).

HE SAYS THE FOUR BY FOUR FORMATION FOUR GROUPS OF FOUR  BEATS "IS THE MOST POPULAR OF ALL RHYTHMS" "NOT JUST IN ENGLISH BUT ALSO AMONG NON EUROPEANS"- FOUR BY FOUR IS 16 16 SQUARES IN THE QUADRANT MODEL- HE SAYS ROCK RAP INDUSTRIAL BALLADS THE FOUR BY FOUR IS THE MOST POPULAR OF ALL RHYTHMIC PATTERNS

https://books.google.com/books?id=9jvRxrf6Sd0C&pg=PA270&lpg=PA270&dq=four+beats+to+a+line+tetrameter&source=bl&ots=LRbrnoco7E&sig=e6V9rKu702Hb7UfO1l9agX6F-iw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiqgsfbnIPUAhXKzlQKHY97DO4Q6AEIQzAF#v=onepage&q=four-by-four%20formation&f=false

QUADRANT

RABINDRANATH TAGORE'S LAST NOVEL WAS CALLED "FOUR CHAPTERS"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Char_Adhyay

Char Adhyay (English: Four Chapters) 1997 Indian Hindi drama film written and directed Kumar Shahani. It is based on Rabindranath Tagore's last novel by the same name, written in 1934.[1]

THE COAT OF ARMS IN THE COUNT OF MONTY CRISTO WITH A CROSS/QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Coat_of_arms_of_the_Count_of_Monte_Cristo.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo

 

The coat of arms of the count are described in the original novel as "une montagne d’or, posant sur une mer d’azur, avec une croix de gueules au chef".

THE COUNT OF MONTY CRISTO AND THE CROSS/CROSSES AND CRUCIFIXION REFERENCES

http://www.shmoop.com/count-of-monte-cristo/christ-island-monte-cristo-symbol.html

A little corvette was bobbing in a fairly large cove; it had a narrow hull and tall mast with a flag flying from the lateen yard and bearing Monte Cristo's coat of arms: a mountain on a field of azure with a cross gules at the chief, which could have been an allusion to his name (evoking Calvary, which Our Saviour's passion has made a mountain more precious than gold, and the infamous cross which his divine blood made holy) as much as to any personal memory of suffering in the mysterious night of the man's past. (85.124)

 

Here, Dumas is making a less than subtle analogy between the island of Monte Cristo and Calvary, the hill on which Jesus was crucified. Franz d'Epinay immediately makes the association between Monte Cristo – "Mountain of Christ" – and the place of Christ's execution. Dumas is a little more coy about his comparisons when he describes the Count's coat of arms, "a mountain with a field of azure with a cross gules" at the chief. In this context, "gules" simply means red; the Count's flag has what looks like a mountain with a red cross on top, against a blue background. Dumas goes on to tell us that this "could be" an allusion to the Count's name, a name which "could be," we can infer, an allusion to Calvary and the cross of Christ; or, that it could be some reference to his own personal suffering.

 

Of course, Dumas wants us to know that it is all those things: Monte Cristo's name – taken from the name of the island – and coat of arms recalls the suffering of Christ on the cross; Edmond Dantès's personal suffering reminds us of the same, and his rebirth as the Count reminds of Christ's resurrection. He, like Jesus, emerges from a cave – although in Edmond's case the cave contains a big chest of gold and jewels.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

NOBEL PRIZE WINNER SEAMUS HENNEYS QUINCUNX (QUADRANT OF FIVE PARTS)

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/seamus-heaney-s-five-towers-of-irish-identity-1.2645611

Seamus Heaney’s five towers of Irish identity

In the quincunx, the poet and Nobel Prize winner is offering a visual representation that traces a far more inclusive and plural interaction of Britishness and Irishness

 

Fri, May 13, 2016, 11:00

Eugene O'Brien

Seamus Heaney’s visual image of his complicated poetic sense of Irish identity is called the quincunx. It is a diamond of five towers, equating to different incarnations of Irishness. The central one represents the native Irish tradition, the round tower of pre-invasion, insular dwelling. Louis MacNeice’s Carrickfergus Castle in the north represents the Protestant tradition; Edmund Spenser’s colonising presence in Cork in the south represents the colonising English tradition; Yeats’s magical and mythical tower in the west represents the Celtic revival tradition and Joyce’s Martello tower in Dublin represents a modernist approach to Irishness

Seamus Heaney’s visual image of his complicated poetic sense of Irish identity is called the quincunx. It is a diamond of five towers, equating to different incarnations of Irishness. The central one represents the native Irish tradition, the round tower of pre-invasion, insular dwelling. Louis MacNeice’s Carrickfergus Castle in the north represents the Protestant tradition; Edmund Spenser’s colonising presence in Cork in the south represents the colonising English tradition; Yeats’s magical and mythical tower in the west represents the Celtic revival tradition and Joyce’s Martello tower in Dublin represents a modernist approach to Irishness

A COLLECTION OF POEMS CALLED "ART OF THE HOLY CROSS"- CROSS IS QUADRANT

http://the-magic-square.blogspot.com/2011/02/

Examples of incorporating calendrical numerology and magic squares into the Christian ideology are demonstrated by the works of Hrabanus Maurus (780 – 856 AD), the archbishop of Mainz, Germany. Hrabanus was a Frankish Benedictine monk during the Carolingian period known primarily for De Laudibus Sanctae Crucis (In Praise of the Holy Cross), a masterful collection of 28 poems that feature his unusual and enduring style of poetry that incorporated imagery onto the manuscript. The letters that are enclosed within the image(s) form an additional miniature poem, that is, poems with in a poem.

HRABANUS AND MAGIC SQUARE GEOMETRY IN "ART OF THE HOLY CROSS"

http://the-magic-square.blogspot.com/2011/02/

Hrabanus adhered to the Church’s formula for sacred geometry as his imagery incorporates:

 

A cross – in – square pattern

The four quadrants

An axis mundi

Numerology associated with the four seasons, lunar or solar cycles

 

 

 

 

This formula for sacred geometry generates the quincunx, a geometric symbol that is used to identify the most sacred of objects, most commonly, illuminated manuscripts.

 

 

 

Poem 9 from De Laudibus Sanctae Crucis

 

Poem number 9 from De Laudibus Sanctae Crucis is composed of 41 lines and columns of letters. These numbers, 9 and 41, correspond to the 9x9 magic square (in the Luo Shu format) that has 41 as its center. This is only noteworthy because the 9x9 magic square corresponds to the Moon in alchemy and magic.

 

Therefore, it may be possible for an illiterate person to somewhat understand the message of the poem through the (numerical) imagery and the association of the numerology with the Moon and the four seasons.

 

Poem number nine mentions time, the revolution of the sun and the moon around earth, order and prosperity, the crucifixion; but mostly the poem is about the glorification of the cross.

 

What is noteworthy in the prose is the role of the light of the sun and moon upon the cross and the resultant shadow of information. Hrabanus is describing the tradition of the gnomon.

 

The poem can be read by substituting the gnomon for the cross.

THE POEM SAYS THE CROSS (QUADRANT) IS THE GLORY OF THE WORLD

http://the-magic-square.blogspot.com/2011/02/

What is noteworthy in the prose is the role of the light of the sun and moon upon the cross and the resultant shadow of information. Hrabanus is describing the tradition of the gnomon.

 

The poem can be read by substituting the gnomon for the cross.

 

Example: Lines 1 – 9:

1. Sun and moon, praise god Jesus Christ.

2 . The cross (gnomon) is your honor, enduring light, peace-bringing order,

3 . glory, goodness, succession, and light for all ages.

4 . Within this space of time (i.e. 365 days) you (the gnomons) measure night and day

5 . And ply your (the gnomons) course according to its perfect rhythm.

6 . The four branches of the stem (the gnomon) contain in its

7 . Thickness six times ten, five times one, and ten times thirty.

8 . For indeed it is recognized that this is the way the sun and the moon are restricted in their circular motion;

9. and the whole year goes around once through all the seasons;

And lines :

20. Altar and scepter of the high god,

21. you (the gnomons) link in a strict order the underworld and the lofty sky;

22. for the cross (gnomon) is the glory of the world.

THE 9 BY 9 MAGIC SQUARE HAS A CROSS INSIDE- SWASTIKA COIN FROM KNOSSOS AND QUINCUNX MAGIC SIGIL OF THE MOON

http://the-magic-square.blogspot.com/2011/02/

The Magic Square, the Moon, the Swastika, and the Quincunx

 

This example of a Greek coin from Knossos, c 350 BC, seems to incorporate the 3x3 magic square, the symbol for the moon, and the swastika.

The Greek coin with the swastika has the number five as its center, or axis mundi. The number five at the center of a cross – in – square pattern with four similar quadrants makes a strong correspondence to the 3x3 magic square. The four quadrants have the symbol for the moon and the four cardinal directions correspond to the arms of the swastika. The quincunx can be seen as the axis mundi as well as the four moons around the center or the four arms of the swastika around the center. The coin also exhibits the circle and square relationship, that is, a square 3x3 grid inside a circular coin.

 

Agrippa's magical sigil for the moon also has a quincunx pattern around its center or axis mundi. The four arms pointing in the four cardinal directions also create the four quadrants where the symbol for the moon resides and just as in the Greek coin from Knossos the crescent moon is pointing in the same direction. Four circles at the end of each arm form a quincunx with the center circle. The sigil also demonstrates the circle and square relationship and corresponds with the 9x9 magic square.

 

The 9x9 magic square demonstrates a cross – in – square pattern as only odd numbers occupy the horizontal and vertical axis. The center or axis mundi is represented by the number 41 as this is the center between 9 and 92 just as the number five is the center number between 3 and 32.

DAVINCIS SKETCH ILLUSTRATING QUINCUNX IS BRANCH ARRANGEMENT (QUINCUNX IS CROSS OF FIVE ELEMENTS)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IGAES_0fZw8/UR4_MnZ4f3I/AAAAAAAAAgk/IgsIzybZ3UQ/s1600/quincunx+davinci+tree.jpg

http://www.gardenhistorymatters.com/2013/02/quincunx.html

DaVinci's sketch illustrating quincunx in branch arrangement. Attrib

Browne asserts that the term quincunx was “in use long before Varro”, a 1st century BC Roman scholar. Varro was widely read by Quintilius and also by Pliny the Elder, who wrote extensively on nature and the ideal arrangement for gardens. Vitruvius read Varro and DaVinci read Vitruvius.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

THERE IS ALSO A QUINCUNX IN THIS BOOK BUT A BIG PART OF THE BOOK IS THE CODE IN THE TETRAGRAMMATON THE FOUR LETTER NAME OF GOD

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_and_the_Compass

 

Lönnrot is a famous detective in an unnamed city that may or may not be Buenos Aires. When a rabbi is killed in his hotel room on the third of December, Lönnrot is assigned to the case. Based on a cryptic message left on the rabbi's typewriter—"The first letter of the name has been uttered"—the detective determines that the murder was not accidental. He connects this with the Tetragrammaton, the unspeakable four-letter name of God, and with his criminal nemesis Red Scharlach.

 

However, Lönnrot isn't convinced that the spree is at an end, as the Tetragrammaton contains four letters—two of them being the same letter repeated. Furthermore, he surmises that the murders may actually have taken place on the fourth of December, January, and February, respectively, since a new day begins at sunset within the Jewish calendar (the murders were all committed at night). He predicts that the next month will see one final killing.

 

Lönnrot becomes calm in the face of his death and declares that Scharlach made his maze too complex: Instead of a four sided rhombus it should have been but a single line of murders, with each subsequent murder taking place on the halfway point (A 8 km from B, C 4 km from each, D 2 km from A and C).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crucifer_of_Blood

 

CRUCIFIX FROM ONE OF FOUR NOVELS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES BY DOYLE "SIGN OF THE FOUR"

 

The Crucifer of Blood is a play by Paul Giovanni that is adapted from the Arthur Conan Doyle novel The Sign of the Four. It depicts the character Irene St. Claire hiring the detective Sherlock Holmes to investigate the travails that her father and his three compatriots suffered over a pact made over a cursed treasure chest in colonial India during the Indian Rebellion of 1857.

CRUX ANSATA IS AN ANKH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crux_Ansata

Crux Ansata, subtitled 'An Indictment of the Roman Catholic Church' by H. G. Wells is a (96 page) wartime book first published in 1943 by Penguin Books, Hammonsworth (Great Britain): Penguin Special No. 129.[1] The U. S. edition was copyrighted and published in 1944 by Agora Publishing Company, New York, with a portrait frontispiece and an appendix of an interview with Wells recorded by John Rowland.[2] The U.S. edition of 144 pages went into a third printing in August 1946.[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Steps_to_Death

Four Steps to Death is a historical novel by John Wilson, first published in 2005. It is about the horrors and tragedies of the Battle of Stalingrad. The plot revolves around the lives of various characters involved in the battle on both sides of the conflict and shows how horrible war can be.

JUNG LOOKS AT THE CABIRI SCENE IN FAUST AND POINTS OUT ANOTHER QUATERNITY WHERE THERE IS FOUR BUT IT IS A THREE PLUS ONE PATTERN- THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT- GOETHE--- I POSTED A LOT OF STUFF ON GOETHE AND QUATERNITIES AND FOURS BEFORE- IT IS IN MY OVER 60 QMR BOOKS THAT I HAD FINISHED OVER A YEAR AGO

http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/German/FaustIIActIIScenesVtoVI.htm

The Nereids and Tritons We’ve brought three of them along,

 

The fourth said he wouldn’t come:

 

He said he was the real one,

 

The only thinker of the squadron.

 

All In Chorus Hail, the gently flowing breeze!

 

Hail, hidden caverns of the seas! 8485

 

Be honoured now, for evermore,

 

You, the Elemental four!

The Four Fists Summary

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Navigate Guide

Summary

Homework Help

 

https://www.enotes.com/topics/the-four-fists

Synopsis

print Print document PDF list Cite link Link

“The Four Fists” is a selection in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s first book of short stories, Flappers and Philosophers, published in 1920 after his debut novel, This Side of Paradise. The main character, Samuel Meredith, is a man who, as Fitzgerald says, “is certain that at various times in his life hitable qualities were in his face, as surely as kissable qualities have ever lurked in a girl’s face.” From boarding school to the business world, he gets into confrontations that lead to him being punched in the face, and these four major conflicts in his life lead him to be the type of man about whom the narrator eventually says, “At the present time no one that I know has the slightest desire to hit Samuel Meredith....”

 

It all starts at boarding school. Being spoiled all his life, Meredith’s sense of superiority over others eventually drives his roommate to finally result to hitting him, and after landing the first punch Meredith finds he does not want to fight back, but just walks away. He faces the usual repercussions from the rest of the boys, but after returning from a later vacation he finds that by keeping quiet about the incident everyone has forgiven him. He soon becomes one of the best-liked boys in school. He has learned his first important lesson from the “first fist.”

 

In college his sense of superiority again leads to trouble. He insults a common laborer one night, and the man lands the second “fist” to Meredith’s jaw. Again, he does not fight back, but realizes that the man had a right to his beliefs and standards. Once out of college and in the business world, he meets a married woman and starts an affair with her. Caught by the jealous husband, the third “fist” lands him on the ground again, and again he realizes the error of his ways. The fourth and final “fist” is from a man who Meredith’s company is trying to buy out, and it shows our hero that there are more important things than money.

 

Of course, all this knowledge gained from the “four fists” makes Meredith a great success, and now whenever he has to make an important decision he rubs his hand along his chin to feel the permanent lump left from the four blows. As Fitzgerald says at the end, “It’s so he can feel again the gorgeous clarity, the lightening sanity of those four fists.”

FITZGERALDS FOUR NOVELS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F._Scott_Fitzgerald

He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night

 

Fitzgerald also authored 4 collections of short stories

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNES FOUR MAJOR ROMANCES HAD TO READ GATSBY AND SCARLET LETTER IN HIGH SCHOOL FOR CLASS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Hawthorne

His four major romances were written between 1850 and 1860: The Scarlet Letter (1850), The House of the Seven Gables (1851), The Blithedale Romance (1852) and The Marble Faun (1860)

I ALSO HAD TO READ THIS BOOK IN MY HIGH SCHOOL CLASS AND THE MAIN CHARACTERS NAME IS CROSS (cross is a quadrant)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Things_They_Carried

The Things They Carried

The reader is introduced to Lieutenant Jimmy Cross, the leader of a platoon of soldiers in Vietnam. He carries physical reminders of Martha, the object of his unrequited love. A death in the squad causes Cross to reconsider his priorities, and, heartbroken, he burns all reminders of his life outside the war in order to stave off dangerous distractions.[5]

 

Love

We are privy to a conversation between Cross and O’Brien, reminiscing about the war and about Martha. O’Brien asks if he can write a story about Cross, detailing his memories and hopes for the future; Cross agrees, thinking that perhaps Martha will read it and come find him.[6]

JIMMY CROSS IN THE THINGS THEY CARRIED IS A CHRIST FIGURE- NO COINCIDENCE NAME IS CROSS

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/thingscarried/character/jimmy-cross/

Jimmy Cross can be viewed as a Christ figure. In times of inexplicable atrocity, certain individuals assume the position of a group’s or their own savior. Such men suffer so that others don’t have to bear the brunt of the guilt and confusion. Cross is linked to Christ not only on a superficial level—they share initials and are both connected to the idea of the cross—but also in the nature of his role. Like Christ, who suffers for his fellow men, Cross suffers for the sake of the entire platoon. In “The Things They Carried,” Cross bears the grief of Lavender’s death for the members of his troop, such as Kiowa, who are too dumbfounded to mourn. In the same story, he makes a personal sacrifice, burning the letters from Martha so that her presence will no longer distract him. In each case, Cross makes a Christ-like sacrifice so that his fellow men—Norman Bowker and Kiowa, in this case—can carry on without being crippled by grief and guilt.

FRYE THE FOUR SEASONS

http://www3.dbu.edu/mitchell/fryemono.htm

Northrop Frye's Monomyth

 

ROMANCE

(the story of summer)

 

TRAGEDY

(the story of fall)

 

arrows3.gif (6746 bytes)

 

COMEDY

(the story of spring)

ANTI-ROMANCE

(the story of winter)

 

Frye argues that all literature (perhaps all of life) participates in this overarching monomyth, which mimics the cycle of the yearly seasons. He suggests that all stories are somewhere along this cycle.

It seems to me that there are a number of problems with Frye's system of archetypal classification, not the least of which is the problem of how we can isolate these few elements as what undergirds all literature. Nonetheless, they do offer suggestive entry points in discussing the mythic or symbolic qualities of some literature, such as Cather's. Cather, after all, holds that there are essentially only a few basic plots in the human story, and she also attaches a certain amount of power to mythic and symbolic expression. Which of the following are present in My Antonia?

FRYE QUADRANT MODELS TWO CONTINUUMS/DICHOTOMIES

http://www3.dbu.edu/mitchell/fryemono.htm

http://www3.dbu.edu/mitchell/images/3302/fryechrt.gif

 

Frye argues that in addition to this overarching monomyth that works of literature tend to fall along the following two sets of continuums:

1) High-Low Mimesis (how human nature is portrayed) & Realism -Symbolism (meaning is attached to action)

 

2) Personal-Social & Experiential-Intellectual

 

Where would you place Cather's novel in each of these?

 

fryechrt.gif (2227 bytes)

 

"All manner of thing shall be well/ When the tongues of flame are in-folded/ Into the crowned knot of fire/ And the fire and the rose are one." -- T.S. Eliot, Little Gidding

https://macblog.mcmaster.ca/fryeblog/critical-method/theory-of-genres.html

The basic organization of the Fourth Essay derives from what Frye, following Coleridge, calls “initiative,” or the “controlling and coordinating power” which “assimilates every thing to itself, and finally reveals itself to be the containing form of the work.”2 The initiative is comprised of four separate categories: the theme; the unity of mood which determines imagery; the meter, or integrating rhythm; and the genre. This complex of factors, Frye asserts, governs the process of poetic composition. He has treated the first two initiatives in his discussion of archetypal images and narratives in the Third Essay. The remaining two, rhythm and genre, are the controlling ideas of the Fourth.

Although within the larger diagrammatic framework Frye’s definition of rhetoric is general, it has a more specialized and traditional reference as it relates to the fourth factor of a writer’s initiative (the genre). “The basis of generic criticism.” he says “is rhetorical, in the {92} sense that the genre is determined by the conditions established between the poet and his public” (AC, 247). Frye calls this rhetorical element the radical of presentation, by which he means the fundamental, original, or ideal way in which a literary work is presented. The radical of presentation of fiction, for example, is the book or printed page; for drama, it is enactment by hypothetical characters.3 In the last section of his “Introduction” to the Fourth Essay, Frye sketches the relationship among the author, the audience, and the radical of presentation for each of his four generic categories—drama, epos, fiction, and lyric. He also specifies for each genre both a predominant rhythm and a mimetic form. These relationships are summarized in Figure 15.

FOUR GENRES

https://macblog.mcmaster.ca/fryeblog/critical-method/theory-of-genres.html

“Radical of presentation,” “predominant rhythm,” and “mimetic form” are, therefore, the three primary categories used to distinguish the four genres. Only one of these concepts, however, is extensively used in the remainder of the Fourth Essay. It seems clear that Frye wants to establish a relationship, on the one hand, between rhythm and the organization of melos-lexis-opsis, and on the other hand, between the radical of presentation and the mimetic form of each genre. The first {93} of these relationships is clearly developed: in what is perhaps Frye’s most original contribution in the entire essay, he shows that the rhythm of each genre has its characteristic melos and opsis. The second relationship, however, after it has been used to differentiate the four genres, almost completely disappears in the discussion of generic forms, as we shall see when we look at the principles Frye uses to distinguish the specific forms of each genre.

To summarize the several conclusions which can be drawn from Frye’s initial framework of categories: first, “rhetoric” is used in two distinct senses, closely paralleling the two rhetorical concerns in the First Essay. Ornamental rhetoric, the lexis of poetry, is an internal, centripetal category, similar to the rhetorical principle underlying the concept of “fictional modes.” But rhetoric in the second sense, defined as the radical of presentation, is analogous to the ethical relationship between poet and audience which Frye has used to define “thematic modes.”

Second, the main function which the second rhetorical category serves is to define the four genres: rhythm, form, and the radical of presentation provide the generic differentiae. And the main function served by the first rhetorical category (the organization of melos, lexis, and opsis) is to provide principles for an ingenious discussion of generic rhythm. This first category has the additional function of helping to differentiate the various rhythms; the rhythm of epos, for example, is distinguished not only by the comparatively regular meter of recurrence but also by the peculiar rhetorical manifestations of melos and opsis, such as onomatopoeia.

Third, rhetoric in the second sense is essentially a matter of style. Frye is not primarily a stylistic critic. But his discussion of rhythm is the one place in the Anatomy where he does turn to what Angus Fletcher calls the microstructure of literature, the effects of individual lines and phrase units.4

FOUR STRESS LINES INHERENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE

https://macblog.mcmaster.ca/fryeblog/critical-method/theory-of-genres.html

His argument begins with a series of metrical illustrations, used to support his thesis that the four-stress line “seems to be inherent in the structure of the English language”

FOUR GENRES THE FOURTH DIFFERENT

http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/02/fourth-essay-rhetorical-criticism.html

The Greeks gave us the names of three of our four genres: they did not give us a word for the genre that addresses a reader through a book, and naturally we have not invented one of our own. The nearest to it is "history," but this word, in spite of Tom Jones, has gone outside literature, and the Latin "scripture" is too specialized in meaning. As I have to have some word, I shall make an arbitrary choice of "fiction" to describe the genre of the printed page. I know that I used this word in the first essay in a different context, but it seems better to compromise with the present confused terminology than to increase the difficulties of this book by introducing too many new terms. The analogy of the keyboard in music may illustrate the difference between fiction and other genres which for practical purposes exist in books. A book, like a keyboard, is a mechanical device for bringing an entire artistic structure under the interpretive control of a single person. But just as it is possible to distinguish genuine piano music from the piano score of an opera or symphony, so we may distinguish genuine "book literature" from books containing the reduced textual scores of recited or acted pieces.

NORTHROP FRYE ON THE "FOUR STRESS LINE INHERENT IN THE HUMAN LANGUAGE"

http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/02/fourth-essay-rhetorical-criticism.html

A four-stress line seems to be inherent in the structure of the English language. It is the prevailing rhythm of the earlier poetry, though it changes its scheme from alliteration to rhyme in Middle English; it is the common rhythm of popular poetry in all periods, of ballads and of most nursery rhymes. In the ballad, the eight-six-eight-six quatrain is a continuous four-beat line, with a "rest" at the end of every other line. This principle of the rest, or a beat coming at a point of actual silence, was already established in Old English. The iambic pentameter provides a field of syncopation in which stress and metre can to some extent neutralize one an other. If we read many iambic pentameters "naturally," giving the important words the heavy accent that they do have in spoken English, the old four-stress line stands out in clear relief against its metrical background. Thus:

 

     To bé, or nót to be: thát is the quéstion.

     Whéther 'tis nóbler in the mínd to súffer

     The slíngs and árrows of outrágeous fórtune,

     Or táke up árms against a séa of tróubles ... [251]

 

     Of mán's fírst disobédience, and the frúit

     Of that forbídden trée, whose mórtal táste

     Brought déath into the wórld and áll our wóe,

     With lóss of Éden, till one gréater Mán

     Restóre us, and regáin the blíssful séat ...

FRYE ON THE FOUR STRESS LINE

http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/02/fourth-essay-rhetorical-criticism.html

Any period of metrical uncertainty or transition will illustrate the native strength of the four-stress line. After the death of Chaucer and the change from middle to modern English, we find ourselves in the strange metrical world of Lydgate, in which we are strongly tempted to apply to Lydgate himself what the Minstrel says to Death in the Danse Macabre:

 

This newe daunce / is to me so straunge

Wonder dyverse / and passyngli contrarie

The dredful fotynge / doth so ofte chaunge

And the mesures / so ofte sithes varie.

FRYE ON THE FOUR BEAT LINE

http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/02/fourth-essay-rhetorical-criticism.html

This stanza will give us a bad time if we try to analyze it as a pentameter stanza of Chaucer's ABC type: the last line, for instance, is not a pentameter at all. Read as a continuous four-beat line, it is fairly simple; and such a reading will bring out what the prosodic analysis could never do, the grotesque, leaping-skeleton lilt of the voice of Death ending in the measured irony of the last line. I do not claim to know the details of Lydgate's prosody, what e's he might have preferred to pronounce or elide or what foreign words he might have accented differently. It is possible that neither Lydgate nor the fifteenth-century reader was entirely clear on all such points either; but a line with four main stresses and a variable number of syllables between the stresses is the obvious device for getting over such problems, as a good deal can be left to the individual reader's choice. In any case I am not indicating how the passage is to be read so much as how it may most easily be scanned: as with metrical scansion, every reader will make his own modification of the pattern.

FRYE FOUR QUADRANTS

http://northropfrye-theanatomyofcriticism.blogspot.com/2009/02/fourth-essay-rhetorical-criticism.html

The view of poetry which sees it as intermediate between history and philosophy, its images combining the temporal events of the one with the timeless ideas of the other, seems to be still involved in this exposition of dramatic forms. We can now see a mimetic or verbal drama stretching from the history-play to the philosophy-play (the act-play and the scene-play) , with the mime, the pure image, halfway between. These three are specialized forms, cardinal points of drama rather than generic areas. But the whole mimetic area is only a part, a semicircle, let us say, of all drama. In the misty and unexplored region of the other semicircle of spectacular drama we have identified a quadrant that we have called the auto, and we have now to chart the fourth quadrant that lies between the auto and comedy, and establish the fourth cardinal point where it meets the auto again. When we think of the clutter of forms that belong here, we are strongly tempted to call our fourth area "miscellaneous" and let it go; but it is precisely here that new generic criticism is needed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orc_(Blake)

In The Four Zoas this is overridden: there the parents produce the four sons Rintrah, Palamabron, Bromion and Theotormon. This is a double-dialectical analysis, rather than an inconsistency as such.

http://shakespeare-online.com/biography/fourperiods.html

Four Periods of Shakespeare's Life

 

From Halleck's New English Literature by Reuben Post Halleck. New York: American Book Company, 1913.

 

We may make another classification from a different point of view, according to the period of his development at the time of writing special plays. In order to study his growth and changing ideals, it will assist us to divide his work into four periods.

 

(1) There was the sanguine period, showing the exuberance of youthful love and imagination. Among the plays that are typical of these years are The Comedy of Errors, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II and Richard III. These were probably all composed before 1595.

 

(2) The second period, from 1595 to 1601, shows progress in dramatic art. There is less exaggeration, more real power, and a deeper insight into human nature. There appears in his philosophy a vein of sadness, such as we find in the sayings of Jaques in As You Like It, and more appreciation of the growth of character, typified by his treatment of Orlando and Adam in the same play. Among the plays of this period are The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV, Henry V, and As You Like It.

 

(3) We may characterize the third period, from 1601 to 1608, as one in which he felt that the time was out of joint, that life was a fitful fever. His father died in 1601, after great disappointments. His best friends suffered what he calls, in Hamlet, "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." In 1601 Elizabeth executed the Earl of Essex for treason, and on the same charge threw the Earl of Southampton into the Tower. Even Shakespeare himself may have been suspected. The great plays of this period are tragedies, among which we may instance Julius Caesar*, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear.

 

(4) The plays of his fourth period, 1608-1613, are remarkable for calm strength and sweetness. The fierceness of Othello and Macbeth is left behind. In 1608 Shakespeare's mother died. Her death and the vivid recollection of her kindness and love may have been strong factors in causing him to look on life with kindlier eyes. The greatest plays of this period are Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.

SHAKESPEARE FOUR PERIODS

http://shakespearestudyguide.com/FourPeriods.html

Scholars generally assign each of his plays to one of four periods, depending on the quality and maturity of the writing and characterization. Textbooks classify these as the Early Period, the Balanced Period, the Overflowing Period, and the Final Period. Not everyone agrees on which plays belong to which period. For example, some scholars place Hamlet in the Balanced Period while others place it in the Overflowing Period. Scholars also differ on the period to which The Merchant of Venice belongs. Some place it in the Early Period and others in the Balanced Period. Plays of questionable authorship, such as Edward III and The Two Noble Kinsmen, generally are omitted from placement in any of the four periods.

 

Following is a listing of the plays according to their periods, as well as a description of the characteristics of the four periods.

FOUR CANTOS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giles_Fletcher

His principal work has the full title Christ's Victorie and Triumph, in Heaven, in Earth, over and after Death, and consists of four cantos.[2] The first canto, Christ's Victory in Heaven, represents a dispute in heaven between justice and mercy, using the facts of Christ's life on earth; the second, Christ's Victory on Earth, deals with an allegorical account of Christ's Temptation; the third, Christ's Triumph over Death, covers the Passion; and the fourth, Christ's Triumph after Death, covering the Resurrection and Ascension, ends with an affectionate eulogy of his brother Phineas as Thyrsilis.[2] The meter is an eight-line stanza in the style of Spenser; the first five lines rhyme ababb, and the stanza concludes with a rhyming triplet.[2] Milton borrowed liberally from Christ's Victory and Triumph in Paradise Regained.

FOUR WORKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynewulf

Cynewulf is one of twelve[1] Old English poets known by name, and one of four whose work is known to survive today. He presumably flourished in the 9th century, with possible dates extending into the late 8th and early 10th centuries.

 

He is famous for his religious compositions, and is regarded as one of the pre-eminent figures of Anglo-Saxon Christian poetry. Posterity knows of his name by means of runic signatures that are interwoven into the four poems which comprise his scholastically recognized corpus. These poems are: The Fates of the Apostles, Juliana, Elene, and Christ II (also referred to as The Ascension).

 

The four signed poems of Cynewulf are vast in that they collectively comprise several thousand lines of verse. In comparison, the one work attributed to Cædmon, Cædmon's Hymn, is quite succinct at nine lines.

THE FOUR MANUSCRIPTS OF OLD ENGLISH POETRY

http://cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikispeedia/wpcd/wp/a/Anglo-Saxon_literature.htm

Old English poetry has survived for the most part in four manuscripts. The first manuscript is called the Junius manuscript (also known as the Caedmon manuscript), which is an illustrated poetic anthology. The second manuscript is called the Exeter Book, also an anthology, located in the Exeter Cathedral since it was donated there in the 11th century. The third manuscript is called the Vercelli Book, a mix of poetry and prose; how it came to be in Vercelli, Italy, no one knows, and is a matter of debate. The fourth manuscript is called the Nowell Codex, also a mixture of poetry and prose.

THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT

http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195396584/obo-9780195396584-0145.xml

“Junius 11” is the nickname of a manuscript of Old English biblical poetry, whose formal shelf mark is Oxford, Bodleian Library, Junius 11. It contains the sole surviving copies of four long Old English poems, which modern editors have titled Genesis, Exodus, Daniel, and Christ and Satan. As these titles suggest, the first three are poetic renderings of Old Testament narratives; the fourth recounts several New Testament and apocryphal episodes in which Christ triumphed over Satan

FOUR POEMS (Pearl poet is Gawain poet I had to read Gawain in high school too- all the books I read in high school were related to the quadrant model)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearl_Poet

The language of the poems shows that the poet was a contemporary of Geoffrey Chaucer, John Gower, and William Langland, who are sometimes (following the suggestion of academic John Burrow) collectively called the Ricardian Poets in reference to the reign of Richard II of England.[1] All four poems of the Cotton Nero A.x manuscript are in the same Middle English dialect, localised to the area of north-western Staffordshire and south-eastern Cheshire, in the English Midlands. This may merely indicate the dialect of the scribe responsible for copying the poems, but there is good evidence that the dialect of poet and scribe were very similar.[2] It is, therefore, thought most likely that the poet was a native of east Cheshire or west Staffordshire and was writing in the latter part of the 14th century, and internal evidence indicates that all four works were probably written by the same author. However, there is not even unanimous agreement on the gender of the author, with features in the language and tone suggesting a possible female writer for Pearl that are absent from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, largely agreed to be the work of a male figure.

I HAD TO READ GAWAIN IN HIGH SCHOOL ALL BOOKS I READ IN HIGH SCHOOL FOR SCHOOL RELATED TO QUADRANT MODEL

http://alliteration.net/Pearlman.html

We do not know who he is, but this author was one of the greatest English writers of the Middle Ages. But we know he exists only because of a single manuscript, containing four poems: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Patience, and Purity. They appear to have been written by a single author; and of these, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is considered to be one of the classics of English literature.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_literature
The highlights include:

The Four Great Classical Novels:
Dream of the Red Chamber, by Cao Xueqin
Water Margin (also translated as Outlaws of the Marsh), by Shi Naian
Romance of the Three Kingdoms, by Luo Guanzhong
Journey to the West, by Wu Cheng'en

THE FOURTH IS DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_I_Write

Four motives for writing[edit]

Orwell lists "four great motives for writing" which he feels exist in every writer. He explains that all are present, but in different proportions, and also that these proportions vary from time to time. They are as follows;

 

Orwell, who is considered to be a very political writer, says that by nature, he is "a person in whom the first three motives would outweigh the fourth", and that he "might have remained almost unaware of [his] political loyalties", - but that he had been "forced into becoming a sort of pamphleteer" because his era was not a peaceful one. In the decade since 1936-37 his desire had been to "make political writing into an art".

FOUR LINE VERSES

https://www.geni.com/projects/Authors-of-Great-Literature/475

Omar Khayyám عمر خیام c (1048 – 1131) Persian polymath: philosopher, mathematician, astronomer and poet. He also wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, mineralogy, music, climatology and theology. He is believed to have written about a thousand four-line verses or rubaiyat (quatrains).

FOUR CYCLES OF IRISH MYTHOLOGY

http://www.yourirish.com/folklore/four-cycles-of-irish-mythology

Many of the Irish legends are made up of stories about adventures, great battles, voyages, invasions and gods but today we categories them into 4 main cycles: The Mythological Cycle, The Finn Cycle, The Ulster Cycle and The Historical cycle.

FOUR BRANCHES EARLIEST PROSE LITERATURE OF BRITAIN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Branches_of_the_Mabinogi

The Four Branches of the Mabinogi or Pedair Cainc Y Mabinogi are the earliest prose stories in the literature of Britain. Originally written in Wales in Middle Welsh, but widely available in translations, the Mabinogi is generally agreed to be a single work in four parts, or "Branches." The interrelated tales can be read as mythology, political themes, romances, or magical fantasies. They appeal to a wide range of readers, from young children to the most sophisticated adult. The tales are popular today in book format, as storytelling or theatre performances; they appear in recordings and on film, and continue to inspire many reinterpretations in artwork and modern fiction.

Four protagonists

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manawydan_fab_Llŷr

Soon after, a magical mist descends on the land leaving it empty of all domesticated animals and humans apart from the four protagonists

The Emigrants is the collective name of a series of four novels by the Swedish author Vilhelm Moberg:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Emigrants_(novel_series)

The Emigrants (1949)

Unto a Good Land (1952)

The Settlers (1956)

The Last Letter Home (1959)

 

The novel-series describes the long and strenuous journey for a party of emigrants from the province of Småland, Sweden, to the United States in 1850, coinciding with the beginning of the first significant wave of immigration to the United States from Sweden. The story focuses primarily on Karl-Oskar Nilsson and his wife, Kristina Johansdotter, a young married couple who live with their four small children; Anna, Johan, Lill-Märta and Harald, as well as Karl-Oskar's parents and his rebellious younger brother Robert, who works as a hired farmhand for neighboring farmers

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Autobiography_of_Benjamin_Franklin

Franklin's account of his life is divided into four parts, reflecting the different periods at which he wrote them. There are actual breaks in the narrative between the first three parts, but Part Three's narrative continues into Part Four without an authorial break (only an editorial one).

THE FOUR CONTINUATIONS

Over the following 50 years four different poets took up the challenge left by Chrétien and continued the adventures of Perceval and Gawain.[2][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perceval,_the_Story_of_the_Grail

 

Later authors added 54,000 more lines in what are known collectively as the Four Continuations.[2] Perceval is the earliest recorded account of what was to become the Quest for the Holy Grail[3] but describes only a golden grail (a serving dish) in the central scene and does not call it "holy" but treats a lance, appearing at the same time, as equally significant.

FOUR GREAT MEDEVIAL ALLEGORIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_in_the_Middle_Ages

The High and Late Middle Ages saw many allegorical works and techniques. There were four 'great' works from this period.[2]

 

The Four Great Medieval Allegories

Le Roman de la Rose. A major allegorical work, it had many lasting influences on western literature, creating entire new genres and development of vernacular languages.

The Divine Comedy. Ranked amongst the greatest medieval works, both allegorically and as a work of literature; was (and remains) hugely popular.

Piers Plowman. An encyclopedic array of allegorical devices. Dream-vision; pilgrimage; personification; satire; typological story structure (the dreamer's progress mirrors the progress of biblical history from the Fall of Adam to Apocalypse).

Pearl. A plot based on an anagogical allegory; a dreamer is introduced to heavenly Jerusalem. Focus on the meaning of death. A religious response to Consolation of Philosophy.

FOUR DAUGHTERS OF GOD

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piers_Plowman

Passus 18: Will sleeps again, and experiences the climactic section of Piers Plowman. He experiences Love and the intersection of human and divine time. Will witnesses Christ/the Good Samaritan/Piers Plowman riding into Jerusalem and Christ's crucifixion. He then witnesses the Four Daughters of God (Truth, Justice, Mercy, Peace) in debate; the Harrowing of Hell; and Redemption.

FOUR GROUPS

https://www.ghazali.org/works/watt3.htm

The `bonds of mere authority’ ceased to hold him, as they ceased to hold the father of modern European philosophy. Looking for `necessary’ truths al-Ghazali came, like Descartes, to doubt the infallibility of sense-perception, and to rest his philosophy rather on principles which are intuitively certain. With this in mind al-Ghazali divided the various `seekers’ after truth into the four distinct groups of Theologians, Philosophers, Authoritarians and Mystics.

FOUR CLASSES

https://www.ghazali.org/works/watt3.htm

III. THE CLASSES OF SEEKERS

When God by His grace and abundant generosity cured me of this disease, I came to regard the various seekers (sc. after truth) as comprising four groups:

 

(I) the Theologians (mutakallimun), who claim that they are the exponents of thought and intellectual speculation;

 

(2) the Batiniyah, who consider that they, as the party of `authoritative instruction’ (ta’lim), alone derive truth from the infallible imam;

 

(3) the Philosophers, who regard themselves as the exponents of logic and demonstration;

 

(4) the Sufu or Mystics, who claim that they alone enter into the `presence’ (sc. of God), and possess vision and. intuitive understanding.

 

I said within myself: `The truth cannot lie outside these four classes. These are the people who tread the paths of the quest for truth. If the truth is not with them, no point remains in trying to apprehend the truth. There is certainly no point in trying to return to the level of naive and derivative belief (taqlid) once it has been left, since a condition of being at such a level is that one should not know one is there; when a man comes to know that, the glass of his naive beliefs is broken. This is a breakage which cannot be mended, a breakage not to be repaired by patching or by assembling of fragments. The glass must be melted once again in the furnace for a new start, and out of it another fresh vessel formed’.

 

I now hastened to follow out these four ways and investigate what these groups had achieved, commencing with the science of theology and then taking the way of philosophy, the `authoritative instruction’ of the Batiniyah, and the way of mysticism, in that order.

FOUR REASONS

https://www.ghazali.org/works/watt3.htm

We next observed the laxity of men’s belief in the principle of prophecy and in its actuality and in conduct according to the norms elucidated by prophecy; we ascertained that this was widespread among the people. When I considered the reasons for people’s laxity and weakness of faith, I found there were four:

(a) a reason connected with those who engage in philosophy;

(b) a reason connected with those who engage in the mystic way;

(c) a reason connected with those who profess the doctrine of ta’lim;

(d) a reason based on the practice of those who are popularly described as having knowledge.

THE FOUR LABARYNTHS OF FRANCE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_of_Saint_Victor

César-Egasse du Boulay in his "Hist. Univ. Paris." (1665) first called attention to Walter's treatise Contra quatuor labyrinthos Franciae (Against the Four Labyrinths of France) and published excerpts from it.[1]

 

The "four labyrinths" against whom the work is directed are four of the major masters of early scholastic thought: Abelard, Gilbert de la Porrée, Peter Lombard, and Peter of Poitiers. It is a bitter attack on the dialectical method in theology, and condemns the use of logic in the elucidation of the mysteries of faith.

 

Walter is indignant at the thought of treating the mysteries of the Trinity and the Incarnation "with scholastic levity". Discarding the best traditions of the School of St-Victor, he pours abuse on the philosophers, the theologians, and even the grammarians. "Thy grammar be with thee until perdition", he cries. This violence, however, defeated his purpose, which was to discredit the dialecticians.

 

Nothing is known about Walter except that, in about the year 1175, he was prior of St. Victor's Abbey, Paris; that about the time of the Third Lateran Council (1179) he wrote the celebrated polemic, Contra quatuor labyrinthos Franciae; and that he died about the year 1180.

FOUR BOOKS OF SENTENCES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Lombard

Peter Lombard, Peter the Lombard,[2][3] Pierre Lombard or Petrus Lombardus,[4] (c. 1096, Novara, Lombardy[3][5][6] – 21/22 July 1160, Paris, France[3][5][6]) was a scholastic theologian, Bishop of Paris, and author of Four Books of Sentences, which became the standard textbook of theology, for which he earned the accolade Magister Sententiarum.

https://archive.org/stream/DimitriGutasAvicennaAndTheAristotelianTradition2ndEditionBRILL2013_201703/Dimitri%20Gutas-Avicenna%20and%20the%20Aristotelian%20Tradition,%202nd%20Edition-BRILL%20(2013)_djvu.txt1 See the synoptic tables of the titles listed in the four early bibliographies of Avicenna’s

works (Tetrapla) and their Inventory in the Appendix. Additional remarks about the “disas-

trous affair” of the preservation and transmission of Avicenna’s works can be read in Reisman

Avicennan Tradition 21-23, an exemplary study for the conduct of research I adumbrate in my

last sentences above.

TETRABIBLOS IS THE BIBLE OF ASTROLOGY- TETRA IS FOUR

http://www.completehoroscope.org/tetrabiblos-ptolemy-astrology.htm

Tetrabiblos is the veritable bible of astrology. "Biblos" in the title is the same word as bible, but it really just means book. "Tetra" is four, so the title simply says that it's a text of four books. We would say chapters. It explains quite straightforwardly the components of the complete horoscope - Zodiac signs, planets, astrological Houses, and the major aspects. Ptolemy's explanations as to their meanings have not been altered much since.

PTOLEMY FOUR MODES OF RULERSHIP

http://www.projecthindsight.com/products/greek%20summaries/ptolemy.html

By an extension of the "familiarization" concept, he similarly attempts to give a scientific explanation for the four modes of rulership and dignification: domicile, exaltation, trigon, bound. Bk I concludes with an itemization of the factors that modify a planet according to its quality and its power.

FOUR PARTS FOURTH IS DIFFERENT- FIRST THREE CHARANS ARE RHYMED FOURTH IS OPEN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovi_(poetry)

An ovi poem has couplets (called kadva or ovi itself). Each couplet is generally divided into four charan (parts/lines). The first three charans are rhymed and have same number of matras (instants) composed of six or eight letters (vary from eight to ten syllables), while the fourth is "open" (unrhymed with the rest), shorter with fewer matras and generally has four letters (vary from four to six syllables). For example, the Dnyaneshwari has eight matras in the first three charans and four to six in the last charan. It is thus called a couplet of three and a half charans. In contrast, an abhanga has four charans with eight letters each.[8][3][9]

 

Example of an ovi from Dnyaneshwari:

 

Devā Tūchi Gaṇeshū |

Sakalārthamatiprakāshū |

Mhaṇe Nivṛtti Dāsū |

Avadhārijojē ||2||

 

देवा तूंचि गणेशु |

सकलमति प्रकाशु |

म्हणे निवृत्ति दासु |

अवधारिजो जी ||2||

 

The ovi was used by another saint, Eknath (1533–1599), too; however, while Dnyaneshwar's ovi has three and a half parts, Ekanath's ovi has four and a half parts. Dnyaneshwar's ovi is considered one of the foremost compositions in the ovi metre. The abhanga metre is said to have originated from Dnyaneshwar's ovi metre.[10]

ALLUSIONS TO CRUCIFIXION

https://digitalcrowsnest.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/allusions-to-the-crucifixion-of-christ-in-literature/

The crucifixion of Christ is arguably the most significant as well as the most recognizable scene of the entire Bible. Even those who do not practice Christianity are generally familiar with the story of Jesus of Nazareth being nailed to a cross with a crown of thorns on his head. This motif has carried over into many significant works of literary merit over the course of time.

 

One obvious example of this specific scene in the Bible being alluded to in literature is in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Scarlet Letter”, when Hester Prynne is up on the scaffold in front of the whole town. She is ostracized and jeered at by the townspeople, just like Jesus was when he was carrying, and later hanging on the cross. When Hester is forced to wear the letter “A” on her chest as a constant reminder of her sin, it is an allusion to Jesus having to carry his own cross up the mountain and then be nailed to it to die.

 

Some other examples of the crucifixion in literature are:

 

Tom Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Okonkwo in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

King Oedipus in Oedipus the King by Sophocles

The picture at the top exemplifies the similarities between the disgraced protagonists of both works. The image of Hester up on the scaffold wearing the letter “A” looks very similar in many ways to the one of Jesus hanging on the cross.

FOUR CATEGORIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einar_Pálsson

In 1969 he put forward his theories about the roots of Icelandic culture and developed them further in a series of 11 books. His theories can be grouped into four categories:[1]

 

Theories

1.1 The mythology theory of Saga origin

1.2 The theory of the allegorical Sagas

1.3 The landscape cosmogram theory

1.4 The socio-mythological theory

The Old Norse (Icelandic) Saga literature has a mythological background. The characters of the Sagas originated as personifications of mythological concepts such as fertility, justice, time, death and the four elements

FOUR ELEMENTS- AND CROSSED KEYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_elements_in_popular_culture

In Dan Brown's thriller novel Angels & Demons, the antagonist kidnaps four cardinals on the night of conclave and brands them with the ambigrammatic words "Earth," "Air," "Fire," and "Water." He then kills each cardinal using a method based on their respective elements; Cardinal Ebner, who was branded with the word "Earth," suffocates by having dirt shoved down his throat. Cardinal Lamasse (Air) dies from having both of his lungs punctured. Cardinal Guidera (Fire) is burned alive, and Cardinal Baggia (Water) drowns in the Fountain of the Four Rivers. Then, the Camerlengo Carlo Ventresca is branded with the Illuminati Diamond—a diamond shape made of the words for the aforementioned elements (also ambigrammatic). It is later revealed that he had done this to himself.

 

These brandings and murders also appear in the film adaptation of Angels & Demons, except Cardinal Baggia does not die; he is instead rescued from drowning and in the end becomes the new Pope. Also, the fifth brand in the film is not the elemental Illuminati Diamond, but rather the papal symbol of two crossed keys.

Main article: Harry Potter https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_elements_in_popular_culture

In the Harry Potter series, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, where most of the books' plots are set, is divided into four houses: Gryffindor, Ravenclaw, Hufflepuff, and Slytherin. Each of the four houses corresponds roughly to one of the classical Greek elements. Ravenclaw's high tower and representative symbol of the eagle correspond to the element of air. Hufflepuff, whose symbol is the badger, corresponds to earth, and their common room is located under the school. The fluid snake symbol of Slytherin corresponds to water, and their common room is located directly under the lake. The symbol of Gryffindor is the lion, exemplifying bravery, quick temper, and boldness, symbolized by fire.

BOOK BASED AROUND THE FOUR ELEMENTS FOUR PREFERETI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_%26_Demons

The book contains several ambigrams created by real-life typographer John Langdon.[1] Besides the "Angels & Demons" and "Illuminati" designs, the title of the book is also presented as an ambigram on the hardcover book jacket (see illustration at right on this page), and on the inside cover of the paperback versions. The book also contains ambigrams of the words Earth, Air, Fire, and Water, which has served to bring the art of ambigrams to public attention by virtue of the popularity of the book.[2] The "Illuminati Diamond" mentioned in the book is an ambigram of the four elements that are arranged in the shape of a diamond.[1]

 

Langdon and Vittoria make their way to Vatican City, where the Pope has recently died. They are told that the four Preferiti, the cardinals who are most likely to be elected pope, are missing. Langdon and Vittoria search for the preferiti in hopes that they will also find the antimatter canister. Their search is assisted by Camerlengo Carlo Ventresca (the late pope's closest aide) and the Vatican's Swiss Guard.

 

The Path leads Langdon and Vittoria to four churches in Rome, each one representing works of art by Baroque artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini which are associated with one of the primordial elements: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. Langdon realizes the four preferiti will be murdered in a way thematically related to each location's related element. The first cardinal is branded with an Earth ambigram and has soil forced down his throat, suffocating him; the second is branded with an Air ambigram and has his lungs punctured; the third is branded with a Fire ambigram and is burned alive; and the fourth is branded with a Water ambigram and is wrapped in chains and left to drown at the bottom of a fountain.

 

Cardinal Ebner: One of the four preferiti from Frankfurt, Germany. He is killed by putting dirt and soil into his mouth.

Cardinal Lamassé: One of the four preferiti from Paris, France. He is killed by punctures to his lungs from which he bled to death.

Cardinal Guidera: One of the four preferiti from Barcelona, Spain. He is burned alive.

Cardinal Baggia: One of the four preferiti from Milan, Italy; the favorite to succeed as the new pope. He was drowned by the assassin.

THE FOUR ELEMENTS PLUS QUINTESSENCE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_elements_in_popular_culture

Captain Planet[edit]

Main article: Captain Planet and the Planeteers

Captain Planet and the Planeteers, an animated series from the early 1990s, is about five teenagers, each with a magic ring that controls an element. When their powers combine, they create a superhero named Captain Planet, who uses the power of all of the elements.

 

Each Planeteer's personality (and sometimes, appearance) reflects their element. The level headed, brown skinned Kwame (Earth) functions as the leader, and holds the group together. Growing up in an African village, he knows much about the land and plant life. Wheeler (Fire), who has red hair and is more temperamental and impulsive, acts as the team's fighting spirit. Linka (Wind) has a passion for bird life, while Gi (Water) is a student of marine biology and has skills in water sports. The fifth element is named as "Heart", and Ma-Ti's ring controls it. Ma-Ti, in tune with wildlife, becomes empathic with both animals and people, and can communicate telepathically with his teammates. Whereas the other Planeteers give Captain Planet his powers, Ma-Ti's ring creates his persona.

THE CLASSICAL ELEMENTS- FOUR TYPES OF VEHICLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Planet_and_the_Planeteers

Gaia, the spirit of the planet, is awakened from a long sleep by Hoggish Greedly, who happens to be drilling above her resting chamber. Realizing that the damage is extensive, Gaia sends five magic rings, four with the power to control an element of nature and one controlling the element of Heart, to five chosen youths across the globe: Kwame from Africa, Wheeler from North America, Linka from the Soviet Union (changed to Eastern Europe after the Soviet Union's dissolution), Gi from Asia, and Ma-Ti from South America.

 

The Planeteers are summoned by Gaia to help defend the world from pollution caused by criminals and villains, as well as natural disasters. The five teenagers, each originating from a different region of the world and who together represent several major ethnic groups, are each given a ring which allows them to temporarily control one of the four classical elements – Earth, Fire, Wind, and Water – as well as a fifth element, Heart, which represents love and communication and enables telepathy and empathy, as well as potential mind control. Pyle cites that the inspiration for the five Planeteers came from real people that she met during the show's pre-production in 1989.

 

Since the show takes place all over the world, the Planeteers have many methods of travel. The group has four different types of vehicles in which they do daily care and maintenance on. Gi is the main engineer of all vehicles. They are all yellow in color.

 

Geo-Cruiser - The Planeteers' most frequently used vehicle. It is a solar-powered jet. The Geo-Cruiser was originally golden only, but during the sixth season, it was given a paint job and is now decorated with red. The Geo-Cruiser is incredibly fast due to a swing-wing design, can hover smoothly and has VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) capability, allowing it to land on top of buildings and in rough terrain.

Eco-Copter - A solar-powered helicopter, in which the Planeteers will occasionally use instead of the Geo-Cruiser.

Eco-Sub - An eco-friendly submarine that is usually used in water-related missions, such as those closer to Hope Island. The Planeteers also use the Eco-Sub to investigate issues out in the middle of the ocean. It is shaped a lot like the Geo-Cruiser and is fitted with a periscope.

Eco-Cycles - Eco-friendly motorcycles. They have engines that are not fuel-combustible, as that would pollute the air. Most likely the engines are electric, as they make a low whirring noise when in use, and they have flashing lights. Of all the Planeteers' vehicles, they are used the least. It is implied that they are stored somewhere on the Geo-Cruiser, but it is not known how they are stored, or if they are aboard for any mission. They appear in only 2 episodes.

FOUR KNIGHTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Crashers

Castle Crashers is a 2D beat 'em up video game developed by The Behemoth. It features music created by members of Newgrounds. The Xbox 360 version was released on August 27, 2008 via Xbox Live Arcade as part of the Xbox Live Summer of Arcade. The PlayStation 3 version was released in North America on August 31, 2010 and November 3, 2010 in Europe via the PlayStation Network. A Microsoft Windows version, exclusive to Steam, was announced on August 16, 2012.[2] The game is set in a fictional medieval universe in which a dark wizard steals a mystical gem and captures four princesses. Four knights are charged by the king to rescue the princesses, recover the jewel, and bring the wizard to justice.

THIS IS ONE OF THE ONLY BOOKS I EVER READ--- IT HAS FOUR PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Carnegie

How to Win Friends and Influence People[edit]

Published in 1936, How to Win Friends and Influence People is still a popular book in business and business communication skills. Dale Carnegie's four part book contains advice on how to create success in business and personal lives. How to Win Friends and Influence People is a tool used in Dale Carnegie Training and includes the following parts:

 

Part One: Fundamental Techniques in Handling People

Part Two: Six Ways to Make People Like You

Part Three: How to Win People to Your Way of Thinking

Part Four: Be a Leader – How to Change People Without Giving Offense or Arousing Resentment

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

FOUR BARDS

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

These poems are some of a

historic character, and others not so, and are attributed,

either by their rubric, by the title of the MS., or by

tradition, to four bards termed Myrddin, Aneurin,

Taliessin, and Llywarch Hen, who are supposed to have

lived in the sixth century.

FOUR BATTLES FOUR GREAT FORTRESSES

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

According to the view I have taken of the site of

these battles, Arthur's course was first to advance

through the Cymric country, on the west, till he came

to the Glen where he encountered his opponents. He

then invades the regions about the wall, occupied by

the Saxons in the Lennox, where he defeats them in

four battles. He advances along the Strath of the

Carron as far as Dunipace, where, on the Bonny,

his fifth battle is fought; and from thence marches

south through Tweeddale, or the Wood of Celyddon,

fighting a battle by the way, till he comes to the

valley of the Gala, or Wedale, where he defeats ihe

Saxons of the east coast. He then proceeds to master

four great fortresses : first, Kaerlium, or Dumbarton ;

next, Stirling, by defeating the enemy in the tratheu

Tryweryd, or Carse of Stirling ; then Mynyd Agned,

or Edinburgh, the great stronghold of the Picts, here

called Cathhregion ; and, lastly, Boudon Hill, in the

centre of the country, between these strongholds.

FOUR SONS FOUR BRANCHES

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

CUMBRIA AND THE MEN OF THE NOKTH. 167

 

or Arthwys, son of Mor, are given four sons — Ceidiaw,

the father of Gwenddolew, Nudd, and Gov; Elivir

Gosgorddvawr, or of the large retinue, the father of

Gwrgi and Peredur ; Pabo Post Prydain, or the pillar of

Britain, the father of Sawyl Benuchel, Dunawd Vawr,

and Carwyd ; and Cynvelyn, the grandfather, by his

son Cynwyd Cynwydion, of Clyddno Eiddyn, Cynan

Genhir, Cad rod Calchvynydd, and Cynvelyn Drwsgl.

 

The second group, consisting of the descendants of

Dyfnwal Hen, also falls into four branches, descended

of four sons of Dyfnwal Hen : — Cedig, father of Tudwal

Tudclud, the father of Eydderch Hael, SenyUt, father

of Nudd Hael, and Servan, father of Mordav ; Gar-

wynwyn, father of Caurdav, father of Gwyddno

Garanhir ; Aeddan Vradog ; and Gorwst Briodawr,

father of Elidr Mwynvawr.

FOUR TALES OF MABINOGI

 

RECENT CRITICISM OF MYTHOLOGICAL POEMS. 201

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

four which form what is strictly speaking the Mabi-

nogi, and are all connected with one another. They

are the following : —

 

The Tale of Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed ;

The Tale of Branwen, daughter of Llyr ;

The Tale of Manawyddan, the son of Llyr ;

The Tale of Math, son of Mathonwy.

 

The supposed allusions run through a considerable

number of the poems attributed to Taliessin, and form

an important group of these poems. Now there is

this peculiarity in these four tales forming the Mabi-

nogi proper, that they do not mainly refer to Wales

as the country of the Cymry, but to the period when

Mona and Arvon were possessed by a Gwyddel popu-

lation, and it is the legendary kings of the Gwyddel

who are the main actors in the tales. These are pro-

bably the oldest of the tales, but the previous remarks

as to the form in which such legends appear in the

prose tales are here equally applicable. The characters

which appear in these tales are, in the first, Pwyll,

prince of Dyfed, and Arawn, king of Annwfn or Hell ;

in the second, Bran and Manawyddan, the sons, and

Branwen, the daughter, of Llyr, and Matholwch, king

of Ireland ; in the third, Manawyddan, son of Llyr, and

Pryderi, son of Pwyll ; and in the fourth. Math, son

of Mathonwy, king of Arvon and Mona, Gwydyon ap

Don, and Arianrod his sister, Llew Law Gyfies and

Dylan eil Ton, her sons, the first of whom became

king of Gwynedd, and Pryderi, son of Pwyll, king of

FOUR KINGS OF WALES

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

Let us now see whether another construction may

not be put upon this poem, which is, to say the least

of it, equally well borne out. The poem opens with a

greeting of Urien Reged. It then mentions three of

the sons of Llywarch Hen — Jeuaf, Ceneu, and Selev.

It then alludes to a competition between " four men

 

 

 

RECENT CRITICISM OF HISTORICAL POEMS. 213

 

maintaining their place witli four hundred, with the

 

deepest water." One of these is mentioned as

 

A Dragon from Gwynedd of precipitous lands and gentle towns.

 

Surely this was enough to have indicated at once

Maelgwn Gwynedd, whom Gildas calls " the insular

dragon," as the person probably alluded to. Then

another is thus alluded to as

 

A Bear from the South, he will arise,

 

and Cyneglas is called by Gildas a "Bear and the

Charioteer of a Bear." If two of the four men thus

indicate two of Gildas's kings, we may well presume

that the four men meant are his four kings of Wales.

It is said of the Dragon of Gwynedd —

 

Killing and drowning from Eleri (a river in Corsfochno)

 

to Chwilfynydd,

A conquering and umnerciful one will triumph ;

Small will be his army on returning from the (action of)

 

Wednesday.

 

And again —

 

He that will escape from the affair of Corsfochno will be

fortunate.

 

Now, does not this contest between the four men, in

which the deep waters play a part, and the Dragon of

Gwynedd triumphs, and which is said to be the affaii-

of Corsfochno, very plainly refer to the transaction at

Corsfochno, whatever it really was, by which Maelgwn

Gwynedd, the insular dragon, became supreme sove-

reign of Wales, and in which these northern chiefs

may have taken a part? The reference to Urien at

the end —

POEM DIVIDED INTO FOUR PARTS

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

There is reason to think, however, that parts of

this poem were compiled at an earlier date than the

reign of Howel dda. It may in fact be divided into

four parts — the first, from the beginning to the end of

the 26 th stanza, containing the stanza mentioning Cad-

waladyr ; the second, from the 26th stanza to the 65th ;

the third, from the 66th stanza to the 102d; and the

fourth, from the 102d stanza to the end.

FOUR ERAS CONNECTED WITH POEMS

https://archive.org/stream/fourancientbooks01skenuoft/fourancientbooks01skenuoft_djvu.txt

There are therefore four eras connected with these

poems, each of which was succeeded by a period of

confusion or national depression : —

 

The era of Cadwallawn and Cadwaladyr, in which

they were first brought into shape ; that of Howel dda

when they were transferred to South Wales, and when

some of the later poems in the Book of Taliessin may

have been composed ; that of Rhys ap Tewdwr and his

grandson Robert Mab Henri, when much of the spurious

poetry was written, none of which, however, appears

in the Book of Taliessin ; and the reign of Henry the

Second, when some of these poems, with others of

the period, were first transcribed in the Black Book of

Caermarthen.

 

The translation of these poems contained in this

work comprises the whole of the poems attributed to

these ancient bards, whether genuine or spurious, as

we find them in the four books — the Black Book of

Caermarthen, the Book of Aneurin, the Book of Taliessin,

and the Red Book of Hergest; but in these MSS. they do

not appear in chronological order, or in any systematic

shape. They are transcribed without reference to date,

me. It's easy.

FOUR ACTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Sassoun

David of Sassoun is the name of only one of the four acts, but due to the popularity of the character, the entire epic is known to the public as David of Sasun. The epic's full name is Sasna Tsrer (The Daredevils of Sasun).

I'm a paragraph.

FOUR CYCLES FOUR GENERATIONS

http://hyesharzhoom.com/prof-azat-yeghiazaryan-discusses-the-armenian-folk-epic-of-david-of-sassun/

Dr. Yeghiazaryan explained that the epic presents a rich legacy of accumulated folk wisdom, as it tells the tale of the lives, loves, and heroic struggles of four generations of the House of Sasun. In his book, he discusses the epic in the context of the Western European, Slavic, and Caucasian traditions.

 

Originally, the epic was transmitted only orally from generation to generation, until it was recorded for the first time in 1873 by Garegin Srvandztiants (1840-1892). The epic has an alternative name of “The Daredevils of Sasun,” however it is popularly referred to as David of Sasun, for the hero of the third and major branch of the epic.

 

There are four cycles in the epic, each named after their hero. The first cycle is about two brothers Sanasar and Baghdasar. Sanasar’s son, Lion Mher, is the hero of the second cycle. The third cycle is about David and the fourth cycle is about David’s son, Little Mher.

here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and

FOUR ARMENIAN EPIC FIGURES

http://hyesharzhoom.com/prof-azat-yeghiazaryan-discusses-the-armenian-folk-epic-of-david-of-sassun/

All of the heroes embody characteristics that are significant in Armenian culture. They represent the strong, fearless men who protect their country. All four Armenian epic figures were great role models for the Armenia people. They faced and defeated evil enemies, such as Msra Melik, the Egyptian king.

edit me. It's easy.

FOUR CYCLES- FOUR GENERATIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daredevils_of_Sassoun

The Daredevils of

Sassoun is commonly cited as one of the most important works of Armenian folklore. This recital of the legendary deeds of four generations of strongmen in a warrior community in the Armenian highlands is in the tradition of heroic folktales that dramatise the story of a whole nation and voice its deepest sentiments and aspirations, but unlike such well-known epics as the Iliad and the Odyssey (Greek), Epic of Gilgamesh (Sumerian), Beowulf (English), Chanson de Roland (French), Cantar de Mio Cid (Spanish) and others one might mention, it has survived solely by word of mouth, transmitted from one generation to another by village bards. The literary merits of the Sassoun saga surpass its value as a historical or linguistic document.

 

 

 

Daredevils of Sassoun[1] (Armenian: Սասնա ծռեր Sasna tsřer) is an Armenian heroic epic poem in four cycles (parts).

 

In the initial decades following the discovery of the epic in the late nineteenth century a general consensus emerged attributing its theme to the struggle of four generations of Sassoun's warriors against Arab rule in the 8th to 10th centuries. The pioneers of this interpretation of the epic were the philologist Manoug Abeghyan in Armenia and academician Hovsep Orbeli in Leningrad who argued that there are no characters in the epic who could be attributed to a historical figure before the 10th century.

The most accurate and complete title of this epic is "Սասնա Ծռեր" (Rebels of Sasun). It has however been published under various titles such as "Սասունցի Դավիթ" (David of Sasun), "Սանասար և Բաղդասար" (Sanasar and Balthazar), "Սասունցի Դավիթ կամ Մհերի դուռ" (David of Sasun or Meher's door) and many others. All these titles correspond with four cycles of the epic.

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FOUR PARTS OF THE STORY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_literature

His poem only covers the story of David, which is actually only one of 4 parts of the story, although the central portion.

 

The four portions of the story are named after their heroes: Sanasar & Balthazar (Sanasar yev Baghdasar), Lion-Mher (Aryudz Mher), David of Sassoun (Sassountsi Tavit), and Mher the Younger (Pokr Mher). Sanasar is the father of Lion-Mher, who is the father of David, who is the father of Mher the Younger. Mher the younger is cursed to never bear progeny and his superhuman powers are too much for the world to handle, so he is enclosed in a mountain cave where he waits until the end of the world to come out and restore order. (similar to the western legends of King Arthur or Barbarossa.)

CHEEVER THE NUMBER FOUR

https://digital.library.txstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10877/5527/REAGAN-THESIS-2015.pdf?sequence=1

“The Swimmer” also displays number symbolism having archetypal significance. Once remarking that he was “very fond of round numbers” (Donaldson, Conversations

74

58), Cheever consistently uses the number four or its multiples in “The Swimmer.” The multiplication of a number increases its power (Cirlot 236). The story is anchored by images of Ned’s four daughters. They are part of the narrator’s initial description of Ned: “His own house stood in Bullet Park, eight miles to the south, where his four beautiful daughters would have had their lunch and might be playing tennis” (BGW 62). When Ned finally returns home to find his house dark and abandoned house, Ned wonders where they have gone (BGW 76).

Cheever uses the number four or its variants to describe Ned’s progress at various points along his swimming route. The narrator describes the progress of Ned’s swim as “nearly half the length of the Lucinda River” (BGW 66) or “about four miles” when he reaches the Hallorans’ pool (BGW 71). In addition, the highway which Ned must cross to reach the public pool at the Recreation Center of the Village of Lancaster is named Route 424 (BGW 68). Multiples of the number four recur throughout the story. The total number of swimming pools in the story is sixteen, counting the Westerhazys’ pool from which Ned originates his swim: “He took off his sweater that was hung over his shoulders and dove in” (BGW 62). Ned’s home is located eight miles away in Bullet Park (BGW 62).

The number four is associated with the circle, the life cycle, the four seasons, the female principle, and the four elements (earth, air, fire, and water) (Guerin 228). According to Cirlot, the number four is symbolic of the earth and of terrestrial space and of the human situation (Cirlot 232). It is equated with the square and the cube, and the cross representing the four seasons and the points of the compass (Cirlot 232). In mystic thought the number four represents the tetramorphs illustrating the quaternary principle

75

linked with the concept of situation and the intuitive sense of spatial order (Cirlot 337). This pattern is completed by the number five: four plus the central point, sometimes denoted by a circle or almond-shaped mandorla; or else by the number seven: four outside and three inside (Cirlot 338).

Ned’s four daughters constitute a tetramorph, which is completed by the fifth central point represented by Ned’s wife, Lucinda. As such, the completed symbol represents the spatial order of Ned’s home and family; the absence of the four daughters and Lucinda at the end of the story represents the disintegration of Ned’s family. In addition, the number four’s archetypal association with the four seasons accords with the story’s mythic images of summer and autumn. The number’s related association with the life cycle echoes Ned’s apparent transformation from middle to old age with its loss of youth and vitality.

Building on the story’s parallels with Homer’s Odyssey, George W. Hunt contends that in crossing Route 424, Ned “tries to traverse the gap between Scylla and Charybdis” (281). Although Hunt’s interpretation does not address the archetypal significance of numbers, such analysis reinforces Hunt’s conclusion. As the first and third digit of the three-digit route number, the number four anchors the route number, with the second digit, the number 2, representing the median, quite literally. An old man slows down to allow Ned to “get to the middle of the road, where there was a grass divider. Here he was exposed to the ridicule of the northbound traffic, but after ten or fifteen minutes he was able to cross” (BGW 69).

THERE IS 16 SWIMMING POOL- 16 IS THE SQUARES OF THE QUADRANT MODEL

https://digital.library.txstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10877/5527/REAGAN-THESIS-2015.pdf?sequence=1

Cheever uses the number four or its variants to describe Ned’s progress at various points along his swimming route. The narrator describes the progress of Ned’s swim as “nearly half the length of the Lucinda River” (BGW 66) or “about four miles” when he reaches the Hallorans’ pool (BGW 71). In addition, the highway which Ned must cross to reach the public pool at the Recreation Center of the Village of Lancaster is named Route 424 (BGW 68). Multiples of the number four recur throughout the story. The total number of swimming pools in the story is sixteen, counting the Westerhazys’ pool from which Ned originates his swim: “He took off his sweater that was hung over his shoulders and dove in” (BGW 62). Ned’s home is located eight miles away in Bullet Park (BGW 62).

THE SEVEN AS THE FOUR PLUS THREE

https://digital.library.txstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10877/5527/REAGAN-THESIS-2015.pdf?sequence=1

The number four is associated with the circle, the life cycle, the four seasons, the female principle, and the four elements (earth, air, fire, and water) (Guerin 228). According to Cirlot, the number four is symbolic of the earth and of terrestrial space and of the human situation (Cirlot 232). It is equated with the square and the cube, and the cross representing the four seasons and the points of the compass (Cirlot 232). In mystic thought the number four represents the tetramorphs illustrating the quaternary principle

75

linked with the concept of situation and the intuitive sense of spatial order (Cirlot 337). This pattern is completed by the number five: four plus the central point, sometimes denoted by a circle or almond-shaped mandorla; or else by the number seven: four outside and three inside (Cirlot 338).

THE HELP FOUR CHARACTERS

https://www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-main-characters-help-please-describe-detail-345171

The cast of characters in The Help is on the large side, however the list of central characters consists of just four characters. These are the characters that drive the action of the novel.

FOUR PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_120_Days_of_Sodom

The four principal characters are incredibly wealthy men, who are libertine, incredibly ruthless, and "...lawless and without religion, whom crime amused, and whose only interest lay in his passions...and had nothing to obey but the imperious decrees of his perfidious lusts." It is no coincidence that they are authority figures in terms of their occupations. Sade despised religion and authority and in many of his works he enjoyed mocking them by portraying priests, bishops, judges and the like as sexual perverts and criminals. They are:

 

The Duc de Blangis – aged 50, an aristocrat who acquired his wealth by poisoning his mother for the purposes of inheritance, prescribing the same fate to his sister when she found out about his plot. Blangis is described as being tall, strongly built and highly sexually potent, although it is emphasised that he is a complete coward, and proud of it.

The Bishop (l’Évêque) – Blangis' brother. He is 45, a scrawny and weak man, "with a nasty mouth." He greatly enjoys sodomy, especially passive sodomy. He enjoys combining murder with sex. He refuses to have vaginal intercourse.

The Président de Curval – aged 60, a tall and lanky man, "frightfully dirty about his body and attaching voluptuousness thereto." He is a judge and used to enjoy handing out death sentences to defendants he knew to be innocent.

Durcet – aged 53, a banker described as short, pale and effeminate.

Their accomplices are:

 

Four accomplished prostitutes, middle-aged women who will relate anecdotes of their depraved careers to inspire the four principal characters into similar acts of depravity.

Madame Duclos, 48.

Madame Champville, 50, partial to have her three-inch clitoris tickled by females; she was a virgin, but her rear is flabby and worn from use, so much so that she feels nothing there.

Madame Martaine, 52, especially excited by anal sex; a natural deformity prevents her from having any other kind.

Madame Desgranges, 56, pale and emaciated, with dead eyes, whose anus is so enlarged she does not feel anything there, missing one nipple, three fingers, six teeth, and an eye.

JAWS WAS MADE OFF OF A REAL HISTORICAL EVENT WHERE FOUR PEOPLE WERE KILLLED BY A SHARK- the fourth different

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jersey_Shore_shark_attacks_of_1916

In 1974, writer Peter Benchley published Jaws, a novel about a rogue great white shark that terrorizes the fictional coastal community of Amity Island. Chief of police Martin Brody, biologist Matt Hooper, and fisherman Quint hunt the shark after it kills four people. The novel was adapted as the film Jaws by Steven Spielberg in 1975

 

The Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 were a series of shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey, in the United States, between July 1 and July 12, 1916, in which four people were killed

TRINITY TO QUATERNITY

http://www.snc.edu/northwind/document/By_volume/sk000_Volume_34_-2015/sk001_MacDonalds_Crystal_Palace-Diamond_and_Rubies_Coal_and_Salt_in_At_the_Back_of_the_North_Wind_-_Lesley_Willis_Smith.pdf

There is, however, symbolic consistency in the very lack of a

parallel between the connection of Horse Diamond with Boy Diamond on the one hand and the connection of Ruby with Nanny on the other. The two Diamonds harmonise and nally enter the trinity of diamonds headed by Mr. Raymond. But the trinity is an incomplete symbol of the self, the wholeness of which must be represented by a quaternity.34 Ruby and Nanny complement each other in symbolising the fourth element (in this case the ruby), which is ambiguous and problematic, since “[this] ‘inferior’ personality is made up of everything that will not t in with, and adapt to, the laws and regulations of conscious life. It is compounded of ‘disobedience’” 35–the one thing Ruby and Nanny have in common

 

In the Mound section of At the Back of the North Wind there

are overlapping quaternities of rubies and diamonds. Horse Diamond and Horse Ruby pull a carriage for Mr. Raymond and his wife, the owner of

the ruby ring; an important link between the animal and human pairs is the fact that both the rubies come from Mr. Raymond.

 

Diamond, the symbolic offspring of the “chymical wedding” 49 of the white and red, the king and queen, makes up a trinity which is turned into a quaternity by the ruby element—in the

24 Willis Smith

same way that the overlapping trinity of diamonds (master, boy and horse)

is transformed into a quaternity by Horse Ruby. Although the in uence of the fourth element—the ruby—de es precise quanti cation, it is signi cant that when Joseph compares the emaciated Horse Diamond with the bloated Ruby he says “[the] horse is worth three of the other now”

 

The family quaternity of Joseph, Martha, their unnamed son, and their daughter Dulcimer is settled in a cottage in the grounds; but

26 | Willis Smith

Diamond, so vital to the original family unit, has moved from a “nest” under the thatch (340) to the more exalted “nest” of a tower room in the main house (341)

 

34. See Jung, Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self, par. 351: “Psychologically . . . three—if the context indicates that it refers to the self— should be understood as a defective quaternity or as a stepping-stone towards it. . . . The complement of the quaternity is unity.” In Psychology and Religion: West and East he says: “If the Trinity is understood as a process . . . then, by the addition of the Fourth, this process would culminate in a condition of absolute

FOUR NOVELS- FOUR ARMED CREATURES- ALSO CRUCIFORMS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperion_Cantos

The resurrection creche can regenerate someone carrying a cruciform from their remains. Treeships are living trees that are propelled by ergs (spider-like solid-state alien being that emits force fields) through space.

 

The Hyperion Cantos is a series of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. The title was originally used for the collection of the first pair of books in the series, Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion,[1][2] and later came to refer to the overall storyline, including Endymion, The Rise of Endymion, and a number of short stories.[3][4] Within the fictional storyline, the Hyperion Cantos is an epic poem written by the character Martin Silenus.[5]

 

Of the four novels, Hyperion received the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1990;[6] The Fall of Hyperion won the Locus and British Science Fiction Association Awards in 1991;[7] and The Rise of Endymion received the Locus Award in 1998.[8] All four novels were also nominated for various science fiction awards.

 

The Shrike[edit]

The region of the Tombs is also the home of the Shrike, a menacing half-mechanical, half-organic four armed creature that features prominently in the series.[12] It appears in all four Hyperion Cantos books and is an enigma in the initial two; its purpose is not revealed until the second book, but even then left somewhat nebulous. The Shrike appears to act both autonomously and as a servant of some unknown force or entity. In the first two Hyperion books, it exists solely in the area around the Time Tombs on the planet Hyperion. Its portrayal is changed significantly in the last two books, Endymion and The Rise of Endymion. In these novels, the Shrike appears effectively unfettered and protects the heroine Aenea against assassins of the opposing TechnoCore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltz THREE OR FOUR SECTIONS

Sama'i (also known as usul semai) is a vocal piece of Ottoman Turkish music composed in 6/8 metres. This form and metre (usul in Turkish) is often confused with the completely different Saz Semaisi, an instrumental form consisting of three to four sections, in 10/8 metre, or usul aksak semai (broken semai in Turkish). Semai is one of the most important forms in Ottoman Turkish Sufi music.[25][26]

FIRST FOUR BOOKS TELEMACHUS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odyssey

The first four books of the poem trace Telemachus' efforts to assert control of the household, and then, at Athena's advice, his efforts to search for news of his long-lost father. Then the scene shifts: Odysseus has been a captive of the beautiful nymph Calypso, with whom he has spent seven of his ten lost years. Released by the intercession of his patroness Athena, through the aid of Hermes, he departs, but his raft is destroyed by his divine enemy Poseidon, who is angry because Odysseus blinded his son, Polyphemus. When Odysseus washes up on Scherie, home to the Phaeacians, he is assisted by the young Nausicaa and is treated hospitably. In return, he satisfies the Phaeacians' curiosity, telling them, and the reader, of all his adventures since departing from Troy. The shipbuilding Phaeacians then loan him a ship to return to Ithaca, where he is aided by the swineherd Eumaeus, meets Telemachus, regains his household, kills the Suitors, and is reunited with his faithful wife, Penelope.

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telemachy

The Telemachy (from Greek Τηλεμάχεια) is a term traditionally applied to the first four books of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. They are named so because – just as the Odyssey tells the story of Odysseus – they tell the story of Odysseus' son Telemachus as he journeys from home for the first time in search of news about his missing father.

FOUR ARMS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varaha

Varaha has four arms, two of which hold the Sudarshana chakra (discus) and shankha (conch), while the other two hold a gada (mace), a sword, or a lotus or one of them makes the varadamudra (gesture of blessing). Varaha may be depicted with all of Vishnu'a attributes in his four hands: the Sudarshana chakra, the shankha, the gada and the lotus. Sometimes, Varaha may carry only two of Vishnu's attributes: a shankha and the gada personified as a female called Gadadevi. Varaha is often shown with a muscular physique and in a heroic pose. He is often depicted triumphantly emerging from the ocean as he rescues the earth.[1][4][6][7][8]