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HAWTHORNE HAD FOUR MAJOR ROMANCES- I HAD TO READ THE SCARLET LETTER IN HIGH SCHOOL- I ALREADY POSTED THE STUFF DESCRIBING HOW THE SCARLET LETTER HAD A FOUR PART STRUCTURE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Hawthorne

Hawthorne was predominantly a short story writer in his early career. Upon publishing Twice-Told Tales, however, he noted, "I do not think much of them," and he expected little response from the public.[95] His four major romances were written between 1850 and 1860: The Scarlet Letter (1850), The House of the Seven Gables (1851), The Blithedale Romance (1852) and The Marble Faun (1860)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._H._Lawrence

Women in Love delves into the complex relationships between four major characters, including the sisters Ursula and Gudrun. Both novels challenged conventional ideas about the arts, politics, economic growth, gender, sexual experience, friendship and marriage and can be seen as far ahead of their time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_Love

Ursula and Gudrun Brangwen are sisters living in The Midlands in England in the 1910s. Ursula is a teacher, Gudrun an artist. They meet two men who live nearby, school inspector Rupert Birkin and coal-mine heir Gerald Crich, and the four become friends. Ursula and Birkin become involved, and Gudrun and Gerald eventually begin a love affair.

 

All four are deeply concerned with questions of society, politics, and the relationship between men and women. At a party at Gerald's estate, Gerald's sister Diana drowns. Gudrun becomes the teacher and mentor of Gerald's youngest sister. Soon Gerald's coal-mine-owning father dies as well, after a long illness. After the funeral, Gerald goes to Gudrun's house and spends the night with her while her parents sleep in another room.

HTE MANIFESTO WHICH SPARKED FASCISM HAD FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascist_Manifesto

The Manifesto (published in Il Popolo d'Italia on June 6, 1919) is divided into four sections, describing the movement's objectives in political, social, military and financial fields.[3]

THE FASCIST MANIFESTO AND THE COMMUNIST MANIFESTO HAD FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Communist_Manifesto

The Communist Manifesto is divided into a preamble and four sections, the last of these a short conclusion

THIS WAS THE ONLY SHOW MY FRIEND AFAM RECORDED WHEN I LIVED WITH HIM AND I USED TO WATCH ALL THE EPISODES I LOVED IT- NO WONDER I DID THE FOUR NATIONS- THE FOUR ELEMENTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Avatar:_The_Last_Airbender_characters

In The Last Airbender, a fictional universe composed of four sovereign nations, the Avatar—a being who represents the bridge between the physical and the spirit worlds—alone holds the power to master all four elemental powers, but has been missing for the past 100 years. During this absence, a war started by the Fire Nation resulted in the Air Nomads' genocide, the Southern Tribes' waterbending population near extinction, and the Earth Kingdom's extensive colonization. In The Legend of Korra, set 70 years later, Republic City, the capital of the United Republic of Nations, serves as the primary setting for the repercussions of said wars, leading to events such as the Equalization movement for non-benders, Harmonic Convergence of the spirit world, civil war in the southern polar region, and the reunification of the fractured Earth Kingdom.

 

The greatest influences on the series were Asian art and history; the characters' various personalities and traits are based on philosophical teachings such as Taoism and Buddhism.[4][5] In the show, some characters have the ability to manipulate one of the four classic elements of ancient philosophy: Water, Earth, Fire and Air, although the Avatar has the ability to control all four.[6] Each of these employ a different form of martial arts in their fighting choreography: T'ai chi for Waterbending, Hung Gar for Earthbending, Northern Shaolin for Firebending, and Ba Gua Airbending.[7] These individual styles of martial arts also reflect on the personalities of the user and the nations as a whole. These starkly individual tendencies are explained in eighty-five distinct types of "Jings", or internal energy.[8] For example, Ba Gua employs the "negative jing" to create erratic circular movements and capitalizes on centripetal force and defensive positions while Northern Shaolin follows the "positive jing" and emphasizes brute strength and aggression to generate power.[7] The negative jing reflects Aang's bending styles and his tendency to be unpredictable and extremely carefree, as well as his pacifist and non-aggressive nature.[9][10][11]

 

Tenzin (Chinese: 丹增 pinyin: dān zēng) is the youngest child of Avatar Aang and Katara and the oldest living airbending master. He lives on Air Temple Island with the Air Acolytes, his wife Pema, and their four children: Jinora, Ikki, Meelo, and Rohan. During the resurfacing of airbending across the Earth Kingdom after the Harmonic Convergence of 171 AG, Tenzin and his family temporarily relocated to the Northern Air Temple. A calm and serious man, he represented the Air Nation on the United Republic Council in Republic City prior to its dissolution and was responsible for educating Avatar Korra in the art of airbending and spirituality.

DOYLE WROTE FOUR NOVELS SHERLOCH HOLEMS ONE WAS THE SIGN OF THE FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sign_of_the_Four

The Sign of the Four (1890), also called The Sign of Four, is the second novel featuring Sherlock Holmes written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle wrote four novels and 56 stories starring the fictional detective.

THE NOVEL HAS FOUR SECTIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fountainhead

Rand wanted to write a novel that was less overtly political than We the Living, to avoid being viewed as "a 'one-theme' author".[67] As she developed the story, she began to see more political meaning in the novel's ideas about individualism.[68] Rand also planned to introduce the novel's four sections with quotes from Friedrich Nietzsche, whose ideas had influenced her own intellectual development. She eventually decided that Nietzsche's ideas were too different from her own. She did not place the quotes in the published novel, and she edited the final manuscript to remove other allusions to him.[69][70]

AYN RAND WROTE FOUR NOVELS- ATLAS SHRUGGED WAS HER FOURTH AND LAST- I DESCRIBED IN THE NOVEL THERE IS A TRAIN WITH 16 CARS- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlas_Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged is a 1957 novel by Ayn Rand. Rand's fourth and last novel, it was also her longest, and the one she considered to be her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing.[1] Atlas Shrugged includes elements of science fiction,[2] mystery, and romance,[3][4][5] and it contains Rand's most extensive statement of Objectivism in any of her works of fiction.

FOUR ESSAYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Is_Ayn_Rand%3F

Who Is Ayn Rand? is a 1962 book about Ayn Rand by Nathaniel Branden and Barbara Branden. It comprises four essays addressing Rand's life and writings and her philosophy of Objectivism. The book's title essay is Barbara Branden's authorized biography of Rand. The Brandens subsequently repudiated the book, deeming its approach too uncritical towards Rand.

HIS FIRST BOOK WAS "THE FOURTH DIMENSION"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._D._Ouspensky

His first book, The Fourth Dimension, appeared in 1909; his second book, Tertium Organum, in 1912. A New Model of the Universe, as explained by Ouspensky in the foreword of the second edition, was written and published as articles by 1914, updated to include "recent developments in physics" and republished as a book in Russian in 1917. It was assumed that that book was lost to the Revolution's violence, but it was then republished in English (without his knowledge) in 1931. Since the earliest lectures this work attracted a who's who of the philosophy crowd (see below) and has been to this day a widely accepted authoritative basis for a study of metaphysics, or rather, to exceed the limits of the same by his "psychological method", which he defines as (paraphrasing p. 75.) "a calibration of the tools of human understanding to derive the actual meaning of the thing itself."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_World_(comics)

"Fourth World" is a storyline told through a metaseries of interconnecting comic book titles written and drawn by Jack Kirby, and published by DC Comics from 1970 to 1973. Although they were not marketed under this title until the August–September 1971 issues of New Gods and Forever People, the term Fourth World or Jack Kirby's Fourth World has gained usage in the years since.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Generations_Under_One_Roof

Four Generations under One Roof (四世同堂 Si Shi Tong Tang) is a 1944 novel by Lao She describing the life of the Chinese people during the Japanese Occupation.[1] An abridged translation The Yellow Storm by Ida Pruitt appeared in 1951. Complete translation into French as Quatre générations sous un même toit by Chantal Chen-Andro with a preface by J. M. G. Le Clézio appeared in 2000.

TWO STANZAS EACH FOUR SECTIONS OF FOUR LINES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whispers_of_Immortality

The poem was developed in two sections; each contains four stanzas and each stanza contains four lines. The first section where Eliot paid homage to his great Jacobean masters in whom he found the unified sensibility is a kind of "versified critique"[2] of Jacobean writers, Webster and Donne in particular. Both Webster and Donne are praised by the narrator, the former for seeing the “skull beneath the skin”(l.2), the latter for not seeking any “substitute for sense/ To seize and clutch and penetrate;/Expert beyond experience,..”(l.10-12). The apparent oxymoron of a "sense" that transcends beyond "experience" is followed by references to "the anguish of the marrow"(l.13) and the uncontrollable “fever of the bone” (l.16) that are too corporeal for mundane experience. The second section begins with a description of a modern Russian woman Grishkin whose “friendly bust/ Gives promise of pneumatic bliss”(l.19-20). In the following two stanzas, Grishkin is compared to the “Brazilian jaguar” which “does not in its arboreal gloom/ distil so rank a feline smell/ As Grishkin in a drawing room.”(l.26-28) In the concluding stanza, the narrator said that even her charm is the subject of philosophy. Nevertheless “our lot crawls between dry ribs/ To keep our metaphysics warm.”(l.31-32).

ONE OF HAWTHORNES FOUR MAJOR ROMANCES- FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS- I HAD TO READ HIS BOOK SCARLET LETTER IN HIGH SCHOOL ONE OF THE FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blithedale_Romance

At this point, the narrator of the story briefly switches to Zenobia as she tells a tale entitled “The Silvery Veil.” She describes the Veiled Lady and her background, though it is never revealed whether her version of the story is true or not. After switching narration back to Coverdale, the story proceeds to Eliot's Pulpit, a place of rest and discourse for the four main characters (Coverdale, Hollingsworth, Priscilla, and Zenobia). There they discuss women's rights, and Zenobia and Hollingsworth agree, against Coverdale, on a more misogynistic point of view. Their disagreements intensify the next day when Hollingsworth and Coverdale discuss their hopes for the future of Blithedale. They disagree so thoroughly that Coverdale renounces Hollingsworth and effectively ends their friendship. A turning point in the novel, the drama culminates with Coverdale's leaving the farm and returning to the city. He there shows a sort of voyeurism, peeping through hotel windows at a young man and another family. Whilst peeping, he spies Zenobia and Westervelt in another window. They notice, and, embarrassed and curious, Coverdale visits them and gets chastised by Zenobia. She also reveals that Priscilla is staying with them, and then all three leave Coverdale for an unnamed appointment. Motivated once more by curiosity, he seeks out Old Moodie, who when drunk tells him the story of Fauntleroy, Zenobia, and Priscilla. It turns out that Old Moodie is Fauntleroy and the father of Zenobia, and was once a wealthy man. He fell from grace, but remarried later and had another child, Priscilla, making the two women half sisters.

AGAIN HAWTHORNE WROTE FOUR MAJOR ROMANCES- THE MARBLE FAUN HAD FOUR MAIN CHARCTERS AS WELL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Marble_Faun

The Marble Faun: Or, The Romance of Monte Beni, also known by the British title Transformation, was the last of the four major romances by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and was published in 1860. The Marble Faun, written on the eve of the American Civil War, is set in a fantastical Italy. The romance mixes elements of a fable, pastoral, gothic novel, and travel guide.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Characters

2 Composition and publication history

3 Critical response

4 Influence

5 Adaptations

6 Notes

7 External links

Characters[edit]

This romance focuses on four main characters: Miriam, Hilda, Kenyon, and Donatello.

F SCOTT FITZGERALD IS ANOTHER VERY FAMOUS AUTHOR- I ALSO HAD TO READ HIS NOVEL IN MY LITERATURE CLASS IN HIGH SCHOOL THE GREAT GASBY HE ALSO WROTE FOUR NOVELS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F._Scott_Fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940), known professionally as F. Scott Fitzgerald, was an American novelist and short story writer, whose works illustrate the Jazz Age. While he achieved limited success in his lifetime, he is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. Fitzgerald is considered a member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night.

THE LARGE AHDRON COLLIDER HAS FOUR PARTICLE DETECTORS AND FOUR LAYERS OF DETECTORS

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Hadron_Collider

At the collision site, there are four layers of detectors. The explosion passes through each layer and each detector records a different stage of the reaction.

FOUR VOLUMES FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cities_in_Flight

Cities in Flight is a four-volume series of science fiction stories by American writer James Blish, originally published between 1950 and 1962, which were first known collectively as the "Okie" novels. The series features entire cities that are able to fly through space using an anti-gravity device, the spindizzy. The stories cover roughly two thousand years, from their very near future to the end of the universe. One story, "Earthman, Come Home" won a Retro Hugo Award in 2004 for Best Novelette.[1] Since 1970, the primary edition has been the omnibus volume first published in paperback by Avon Books.[2] Over the years James Blish made many changes to these stories in response to points raised in letters from readers.

 

The books

1.1 They Shall Have Stars

1.2 A Life for the Stars

1.3 Earthman, Come Home

1.4 A Clash of Cymbals/The Triumph of Time

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_XIV_of_France
A character based on Louis plays an important role in The Age of Unreason, a series of four alternate history novels written by American science fiction and fantasy author Gregory Keyes.

FOUR GREAT AGES VOLTAIRE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_XIV_of_France
Voltaire's history, The Age of Louis XIV, named Louis' reign as not only one of the four great ages in which reason and culture flourished, but the greatest ever.[109][110]

THE FOUR GREAT AGES
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Age_of_Louis_XIV
In common with other Enlightenment philosophers, Voltaire saw the age of Alexander the Great and Pericles, the age of Caesar and Augustus, and the Italian Renaissance as "great ages" or "ages of light". He presented the age of Louis XIV as the fourth and greatest.[5]

FOUR BOOKS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Age_of_Unreason
The Age of Unreason is a series of four novels written by Gregory Keyes:

Newton's Cannon (1998), ISBN 1-56865-829-X
A Calculus of Angels (1999), ISBN 0-7394-0260-9
Empire of Unreason (2000), ISBN 0-345-40609-5
The Shadows of God (2001), ISBN 0-345-43904-X
Its title is a reference to Thomas Paine's treatise The Age of Reason. The story spans the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, with the action moving between England and France, later involving Russia, Austria, the Republic of Venice, and North America. The author makes use of pseudosciences (scientific alchemy instead of our physics) that were popular at the time: using affinity and aether, for example. Some historical characters appear in important roles: Isaac Newton, Voltaire, Benjamin Franklin, Cotton Mather, King Louis XIV of France, Emperor Peter the Great of Russia, King Charles XII of Sweden, and Edward Teach, better known as the pirate Blackbeard.

FOUR GROUPS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmina_Burana

Generally, the works contained in the Carmina Burana can be arranged into four groups according to theme:[4]

 

55 songs of morals and mockery (CB 1–55)

131 love songs (CB 56–186)

40 drinking and gaming songs (CB 187–226)

two longer spiritual theater pieces (CB 227 and 228)

FOUR OF THEM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Moby-Dick_characters#Harpooneers

Harpooneers[edit]

https://www.sporcle.com/games/sproutcm/LiteraryFoursomes

Queequeg

Main article: Queequeg

The harpooneers of the Pequod are all non-Christians from various parts of the world. Each serves on a mate's boat.

 

Queequeg hails from the fictional island of Rokovoko in the South Seas, inhabited by a cannibal tribe, and is the son of the chief of his tribe. Since leaving the island, he has become extremely skilled with the harpoon. He befriends Ishmael early in the novel, when they meet before leaving for Nantucket. He is described as existing in a state between civilized and savage. Queequeg is the harpooneer on Starbuck's boat, where Ishmael is also an oarsman. Queequeg is best friends with Ishmael in the story. He is prominent early in the novel, but later fades in significance, as does Ishmael.

 

Tashtego is described as a Gay Head (Wampanoag) Native American harpooneer. The personification of the hunter, he turns from hunting land animals to hunting whales. Tashtego is the harpooneer on Stubb's boat.

 

Daggoo is a tall (6' 5") African harpooneer from a coastal village with a noble bearing and grace. He is the harpooneer on Flask's boat.

 

Fedallah is the harpooneer on Ahab's boat. He is of Indian Zoroastrian ("Parsi") descent. He is described as having lived in China. At the time when the Pequod sets sail, Fedallah is hidden on board, and he later emerges with Ahab's boat's crew. Fedallah is referred to in the text as Ahab's "Dark Shadow". Ishmael calls him a "fire worshipper" and the crew speculates that he is a devil in man's disguise. He is the source of a variety of prophecies regarding Ahab and his hunt for Moby Dick.

ONLY FOUR NOVELS PRINTED WHEN ALIVE- AGAIN I HAD TO READ PRIDE AND PREJUIDCE IN HIGH SCHOOL

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Austen

 

Jane Austen was very modest about her own genius.[7] She once famously described her work as "the little bit (two Inches wide) of Ivory, on which I work with so fine a brush, as produces little effect after much labor".[7] When she was a girl she wrote stories. Her works were printed only after much revision. Only four of her novels were printed while she was alive. They were Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Jane_Austen

Jane Austen was primarily educated at home by her father and older brothers and through her own reading.[19] Her apprenticeship as a writer lasted from her teenage years until she was about thirty-five years old. During this period, she wrote three major novels and began a fourth.[20] From 1811 until 1815, with the release of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815), she achieved success as a published writer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_in_Austen

The four parts of the miniseries were put together into a movie and released on DVD. The North American version differs in that the scene with Amanda Price singing "Downtown" was eliminated as was a ringtone using the music from the 1995 BBC version of Pride and Prejudice.

 

 

Lost in Austen is a four-part 2008 British television series for the ITV network, written by Guy Andrews as a fantasy adaptation of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Amanda, a woman from modern London, enters the plot of the novel through a portal in her bathroom, to join the Bennet family and affect events disastrously.

SHAKESPEARE FOUR PRINCIPAL TRAGEDIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Characters_of_Shakespear%27s_Plays

Among Shakespeare's four principal tragedies, Macbeth, according to Hazlitt in this chapter, is notable for its wild extremes of action, its preponderance of violence, and its representation of "imagination" strained to the verge of the forbidden and the darker mysteries of existence. "This tragedy is alike distinguished for the lofty imagination it displays, and for the tumultuous vehemence of the action; and the one is made the moving principle of the other", Hazlitt writes.[116] Macbeth "moves upon the verge of an abyss, and is a constant struggle between life and death. The action is desperate and the reaction is dreadful. [...] The whole play is an unruly chaos of strange and forbidden things, where the ground rocks under our feet."[117]

 

While Hazlitt's discussion of Othello includes observations about the characters, his consideration of this play, as with all of the four major tragedies, is combined with ideas about the purpose and value of tragedy and even of poetry in general. Expanding upon Aristotle's idea in the Poetics that "tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity,"[144] he asserts that tragedy "makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity."[145]

 

Hazlitt ends the chapter by making four points about genius, poetry, and especially tragedy. To David Bromwich the most important of these is the third, "That the greatest strength of genius is shewn in describing the strongest passions: for the power of the imagination, in works of invention, must be in proportion to the force of the natural impressions, which are the subject of them."[112]

VERY FAMOUS FOUR MAIN CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Othello

Othello (The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603. It is based on the story Un Capitano Moro ("A Moorish Captain") by Cinthio, a disciple of Boccaccio, first published in 1565.[1] The story revolves around four central characters: Othello, a Moorish general in the Venetian army; his beloved wife, Desdemona; his loyal lieutenant, Cassio; and his trusted but ultimately unfaithful ensign, Iago. Given its varied and enduring themes of racism, love, jealousy, betrayal, revenge and repentance, Othello is still often performed in professional and community theatre alike, and has been the source for numerous operatic, film, and literary adaptations.

SHAKESPEARES TETROLOGIES (TETRA IS FOUR)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetralogy

In the classical period of literature, Shakespeare is known to have drafted a pair of tetralogies, the first consisting of the three Henry VI plays and Richard III, and the second consisting of Richard II, the two Henry IV plays, and Henry V.[5]

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inheritance_Cycle

The Inheritance Cycle is a young adult tetralogy of epic fantasy novels written by American author Christopher Paolini. Set in the fictional world of Alagaësia (/æləˈɡeɪziə/), the novels focus on the adventures of a teenage boy named Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, as they struggle to overthrow the evil king Galbatorix. The series was originally intended to be a trilogy (named the "Inheritance Trilogy") until Paolini announced on October 30, 2007, while working on the third novel, that he believed the story was too complex to conclude in just three books.

 

The book series as a whole received mostly mixed to negative reviews by critics, but has gained both popularity and commercial success. The first book in the series, Eragon, was originally self-published by Paolini in 2001, and subsequently re-published by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers on June 25, 2003. The second book in the series, Eldest, was published by Knopf on August 23, 2005. Both were New York Times bestsellers.[1][2][3] The third book in the series, Brisingr, was published by Knopf on September 20, 2008.[4] The fourth and final book in the series, Inheritance, was published by Knopf on November 8, 2011.[5] The series has sold 33.5 million copies worldwide.

 

Brisingr—a word that means "fire" in Alagaësia's ancient language, taken from Old Norse—was published on September 20, 2008. Paolini's announcement of the book's publishing date included the revelation that the Inheritance Trilogy would now contain four books instead of three, thus resulting in the renaming of the series to the Inheritance Cycle.

 

Eragon's Guide to Alagaësia is a supplemental book to the Inheritance Cycle, published in November 2009. The book takes the appearance of being written by Eragon after the events of Inheritance, and is directed at a "young Dragon Rider" (the reader). It is a collection of information about the characters, settings and objects referred to in the Inheritance novels.[8] It is Paolini's fourth book.[9] Fully in color, the book features fifteen pieces of artwork depicting cities and the various races of Alagaësia.[10] The illustrations were created by Fred Gambino, Larry McDougal, Ian Miller, and David Wyatt.[11] According to the Publishers Weekly Children's Hardcover Frontlist, more than 100,000 copies of the book were sold in 2009.[12]

FOUR NOVELS AND FOUR INCARNATIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sea_of_Fertility

The Sea of Fertility (豊饒の海 Hōjō no Umi?) is a tetralogy of novels written by the Japanese author Yukio Mishima. The four novels are Spring Snow (1969),[1] Runaway Horses (1969), The Temple of Dawn (1970), and The Decay of the Angel (1971).[2] The series, which Mishima began writing in 1964 and which was his final work, is usually thought of as his masterpiece. Its title refers to the Mare Fecunditatis, a lunar mare.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Plot

2 Background

3 Response

4 References

Plot[edit]

The main timeline of the story stretches from 1912 to 1975. The viewpoint of all four books is that of Shigekuni Honda, a law student in Spring Snow who eventually becomes a wealthy retired judge in The Decay of the Angel. Each of the novels depicts what Honda comes to believe are successive reincarnations of his schoolfriend Kiyoaki Matsugae, and Honda's attempts to save them from the early deaths to which they seem to be condemned by karma. This results in both personal and professional embarrassment for Honda, and eventually destroys him.

 

The friend's successive reincarnations are:

 

Kiyoaki Matsugae, a young aristocrat

Isao Iinuma, a nationalist and violent extremist

Ying Chan, an indolent Thai princess

Tōru Yasunaga, a manipulative and sadistic orphan

Other characters who appear in more than one book include Satoko Ayakura (Kiyoaki's lover), Tadeshina (Satoko's maid), Imperial Prince Toin, Shigeyuki Iinuma (Kiyoaki's servant and Isao's father), Keiko Hisamatsu, and Rié (Honda's wife).

FOUR MEN WHO ARE DIFFERENT FASCETS OF THE AUTHORS PERSONALITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyōko_no_Ie

Kyōko no Ie (鏡子の家?) ("Kyoko's House") is a 1959 novel by the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima.

 

The book tells the interconnected stories of four young men who represent different facets of the author's personality. His athletic side appears as a boxer, his artistic side as a painter, his narcissistic, performing side as an actor and his secretive, nihilistic side as a businessman who goes through the motions of living a normal life while practicing "absolute contempt for reality".

 

The story of Osamu, the actor in Kyōko no Ie, was one of three Mishima works adapted by Paul Schrader for his film Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters. Although the novel has not been translated into English, Schrader used it because his original choice, Forbidden Colors, was vetoed by Mishima's widow.[2]

OXFORD IS THOUGHT TO HAVE POSSIBLY BEEN SHAKESPEARE-- AN AUTHORITY ON OXFORD SAYS THAT OXFORD DEFINITELY WROTE 16 POEMS- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxfordian_theory_of_Shakespeare_authorship

Some of Oxford's lyric works have survived. Steven W. May, an authority on Oxford's poetry, attributes sixteen poems definitely, and four possibly, to Oxford noting that these are probably "only a good sampling" as "both Webbe (1586) and Puttenham (1589) rank him first among the courtier poets, an eminence he probably would not have been granted, despite his reputation as a patron, by virtue of a mere handful of lyrics".[89]

THE FOUR LYRICAL PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology_of_Shakespeare%27s_plays

Today most scholars tend to concur with a date of 1594–1595, and the play is often grouped with the 'lyrical plays'; Richard II, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, because of its prolific use of rhyming. These four plays are argued to represent a phase of Shakespeare's career when he was experimenting with rhyming iambic pentameter as an alternative form to standard blank verse; Richard II has more rhymed verse than any other history play (19.1%), Romeo and Juliet more than any other tragedy (16.6%) and Love's Labour's and Midsummer Night more than any other comedy (43.1% and 45.5% respectively).[112] All four tend to be dated to the period 1594–1595.[113] In support of this, Ants Oras' pause test places the play after Richard III, which is usually dated 1592. Furthermore, Gary Taylor finds possible allusions to the Gray's Inn revels of December 1594 (specifically the Muscovite masque in 5.2), and also finds plausible Geoffrey Bullough's argument that the satirical presentation of the King of Navarre (loosely based on Henry of Navarre, who was associated with oath breaking after abjuring Protestantism in 1593) favours a date after December 1594, when Henry survived an assassination attempt by Jean Châtel. All of this suggests a date of late 1594 to early 1595.[103][114][115]

THE FOUR LYRICAL PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology_of_Shakespeare%27s_plays

Henry VI, Part 2 (1591)[edit]

Today most scholars tend to concur with a date of 1594–1595, and the play is often grouped with the 'lyrical plays'; Richard II, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, because of its prolific use of rhyming. These four plays are argued to represent a phase of Shakespeare's career when he was experimenting with rhyming iambic pentameter as an alternative form to standard blank verse; Richard II has more rhymed verse than any other history play (19.1%), Romeo and Juliet more than any other tragedy (16.6%) and Love's Labour's and Midsummer Night more than any other comedy (43.1% and 45.5% respectively).[112] All four tend to be dated to the period 1594–1595.[113] In support of this, Ants Oras' pause test places the play after Richard III, which is usually dated 1592. Furthermore, Gary Taylor finds possible allusions to the Gray's Inn revels of December 1594 (specifically the Muscovite masque in 5.2), and also finds plausible Geoffrey Bullough's argument that the satirical presentation of the King of Navarre (loosely based on Henry of Navarre, who was associated with oath breaking after abjuring Protestantism in 1593) favours a date after December 1594, when Henry survived an assassination attempt by Jean Châtel. All of this suggests a date of late 1594 to early 1595.[103][114][115]

THE FOUR LYRICAL PLAYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology_of_Shakespeare%27s_plays

Evidence: Richard II is usually seen as one of the 'lyrical plays', along with Love's Labour's Lost, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream; four plays in which Shakespeare used rhymed iambic pentameter more than anywhere else in his career. The four plays also include elaborate punning, rhetorical patterning, a general avoidance of colloquialisms and a high volume of metrical regularity. All four of these plays tend to be dated to 1594–1595.[113] Also important in dating the play is Samuel Daniel's The First Four Books of the Civil Wars, which was entered into the Stationers' Register on 11 October 1594, and published in early 1595. Although some scholars have suggested that Daniel used Shakespeare as a source, which would mean the play was written somewhat earlier than 1594, most agree that Shakespeare used Daniel, especially in some of the later scenes, meaning the play could not have been written earlier than 1595.[120][121]

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sentences

The Four Books of Sentences (Libri Quattuor Sententiarum) is a book of theology written by Peter Lombard in the 12th century. It is a systematic compilation of theology, written around 1150; it derives its name from the sententiae or authoritative statements on biblical passages that it gathered together.

 

Lombard arranged his material from the Bible and the Church Fathers in four books, then subdivided this material further into chapters. Probably between 1223 and 1227, Alexander of Hales grouped the many chapters of the four books into a smaller number of "distinctions". In this form, the book was widely adopted as a theological textbook in the high and late Middle Ages (the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries). A commentary on the Sentences was required of every master of theology, and was part of the examination system. At the end of lectures on Lombard's work, a student could apply for bachelor status within the theology faculty.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_quattro_libri_dell%27architettura

I quattro libri dell'architettura (The Four Books of Architecture) is a treatise on architecture by the architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580), written in Italian. It was first published in four volumes in 1570 in Venice, illustrated with woodcuts after the author's own drawings. It has been reprinted and translated many times (often in single-volume format). Book I was first published in English in 1663 in a London edition by Godfrey Richards. The first complete English language edition was published in London by the Italian-born architect Giacomo Leoni in 1716-1720.[2]

FOUR LANDS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shannara

Shannara /ˈʃænərə/[1] is a series of high fantasy[2] novels written by Terry Brooks, beginning with The Sword of Shannara in 1977 and continuing through The Sorcerer's Daughter which was released in May 2016; there is also a prequel, First King of Shannara. The series blends magic and primitive technology and is set in the Four Lands, which are identified as Earth long after civilization was destroyed in a chemical and nuclear holocaust called the Great Wars. By the time of the prequel First King of Shannara, the world had reverted to a pre-industrial state and magic had re-emerged to supplement science.

 

The Shannara series is set in a post-apocalyptic world called the Four Lands. This world is a futuristic version of our own, and not a secondary world. The Genesis of Shannara trilogy reveals the Four Lands to be located in the modern Pacific Northwest region of the United States and Canada. Much of the landscape has been changed by a future holocaust called The Great Wars, but some landmarks remain. For example, the Columbia River still exists.[3]

 

Each land is named after the compass point it faces: the Northland, the Southland, the Eastland, and the Westland, and is the primary home of different peoples. The Westland is the homeland primarily of the elves, while the Northland is mostly inhabited by trolls and the Eastland is the home mostly of dwarves and gnomes. The Southland is primarily the homeland of humans.

 

Maps of the Four Lands:

FOUR QUADRANT FILM

http://www.la-screenwriter.com/2014/12/29/what-is-a-four-quadrant-film/

The first time someone told me a script I wrote wasn’t “four-quadrant,” I had no clue what they were talking about. “Four-quadrant” is a term that gets thrown around a lot in Hollywood, and it’s an important term for screenwriters to know and to use in their writing process.

 

The four quadrants are the four basic demographics that attend movies: men over the age of 25, men under 25, women over 25, and women under 25. Some studio execs might try to tell you that one of those demographics is more important than the others, but the truth of the matter is that the categories are split up the way they are so that the result is a pretty balanced view of movie goers.

DR SEUSS WROTE IN TETRAMETER- FOUR UNITS PER LINE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Seuss

Geisel wrote most of his books in anapestic tetrameter, a poetic meter employed by many poets of the English literary canon. This is often suggested as one of the reasons that Geisel's writing was so well received.[75][76]

 

Anapestic tetrameter consists of four rhythmic units called anapests, each composed of two weak syllables followed by one strong syllable (the beat); often, the first weak syllable is omitted, or an additional weak syllable is added at the end. An example of this meter can be found in Geisel's "Yertle the Turtle", from Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories:

 

And today the Great Yertle, that Marvelous he

Is King of the Mud. That is all he can see.[77]

 

Some books by Geisel that are written mainly in anapestic tetrameter also contain many lines written in amphibrachic tetrameter, such as these from If I Ran the Circus:

 

All ready to put up the tents for my circus.

I think I will call it the Circus McGurkus.

 

And NOW comes an act of Enormous Enormance!

No former performer's performed this performance!

 

Geisel also wrote verse in trochaic tetrameter, an arrangement of a strong syllable followed by a weak syllable, with four units per line (for example, the title of One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish). Traditionally, English trochaic meter permits the final weak position in the line to be omitted, which allows both masculine and feminine rhymes.

 

Geisel generally maintained trochaic meter for only brief passages, and for longer stretches typically mixed it with iambic tetrameter, which consists of a weak syllable followed by a strong, and is generally considered easier to write. Thus, for example, the magicians in Bartholomew and the Oobleck make their first appearance chanting in trochees (thus resembling the witches of Shakespeare's Macbeth):

FOUR SEPARATE STORIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sneetches_and_Other_Stories

The Sneetches and Other Stories is a collection of stories by American author Dr. Seuss, published in 1953. It is composed of four separate stories with themes of tolerance, diversity, and compromise: "The Sneetches", "The Zax", "Too Many Daves", and "What Was I Scared Of?". Based on a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children."[2] In 2012 it was ranked number 63 among the "Top 100 Picture Books" in a survey published by School Library Journal – the fifth of five Dr. Seuss books on the list.[3]

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pocket_Book_of_Boners

The Pocket Book of Boners is a book illustrated by Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss), originally published as four separate books in 1931–32 by The Viking Press. In 1941, Readers' League of America compiled these four books and published the Pocket Book of Boners.[1] It was one of the bestselling paperback books of World War II, with 1.34 million copies in print by 1945.[2]

 

The Pocket Book of Boners contains 22 illustrations of bloopers by Dr. Seuss. The rest of the volume consists of short jokes and humorous observations with most being no more than four lines long, and is notable for its early examples of Dr. Seuss' illustration style.[citation needed].

 

Boners series[edit]

The first book was released in February 1931. A short positive review in The New York Times described Dr. Seuss's illustrations as "hilarious."[3] The pseudonym "Alexander Abingdon" was used as the author of the series, which was originally released in order as follows.

 

Boners (102 p.)(copyright February 7, 1931) (illustrated by Dr. Seuss)

More Boners (copyright April 31, 1931) (illustrated by Dr. Seuss)

Still More Boners (copyright August 4, 1931)(illustrated by Virginia Huget)

Prize Boners for 1932 (copyright March 4, 1932) (illustrated by Virginia Huget).[4][5]

Many compilations of Boners content were subsequently released, including The Omnibus Boners (1931) and The 2nd Boners Omnibus (1938) (pictures by Galdone).[6]

TETRALOGY FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lycurgeia

The Lycurgeia (Ancient Greek: Λυκούργεια, Lykoúrgeia) is a lost tetralogy by the Athenian dramatist Aeschylus that concerned Thracian Lycurgus' conflict with Dionysus and its aftermath. The four plays that made up the Lycurgeia survive only in fragments quoted by ancient authors, and the reconstruction of much of their content is a matter of conjecture.[1] In the Edoni (Ἠδωνοί, Ēdōnoí), Dionysus presumably arrived in Thrace where King Lycurgus attempted to suppress the worship of the new god. The second play, the Bassarids (Βασσαρίδες, Bassarídes), is supposed to have treated the death of Orpheus at the hands of Thracian women in the thrall of Dionysus. Very little is known of the third play, the Youths (Νεανισκοί, Neaniskoí), but M.L. West has proposed that it culminated in the acceptance of the cult of Dionysus in Thrace.[2] The satyr play was named Lycurgus (Λυκοῦργος, Lykoûrgos) after the king, and might have presented his attempt to domesticate the satyrs, civilizing their bestial nature and forcing them to perform at his feasts in "honour not of Dionysus, but of himself and Ares."[3]

The Ware Tetralogy is a series of four science fiction novels by author Rudy Rucker: Software (1982), Wetware (1988), Freeware (1997) and Realware (2000).[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ware_Tetralogy

The first two books both received the Philip K. Dick Award for best novel. The closest to the cyberpunk genre of all his works, the tetralogy explores themes such as rapid technological change, generational differences, consciousness, mortality and recreational drug use.

 

In 2010, Prime Books published The Ware Tetralogy: Four Novels by Rudy Rucker, which collects the entire series in a single paperback volume and includes an introduction by noted cyberpunk author William Gibson. The online version of The Ware Tetralogy was simultaneously released for free distribution under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No-Derivative License.[2]

 

Contents [hide]

1 Plot summary

1.1 Software

1.2 Wetware

1.3 Freeware

1.4 Realware

 

Realware[edit]

In Realware, a fourth-dimensional being is worshiped as a god by aliens living near Tonga. After humans are captured and swallowed by the being, Phil Gottner goes to investigate. As a gift for allowing them to be studied by him, the being gives humanity an "alla", a device capable of making real anything imaginable.

FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingo_tetralogy

The Ingo tetralogy is a series of four children's novels, set in Cornwall, by British author Helen Dunmore.[1] The four books are, in chronological order, Ingo, The Tide Knot, The Deep and The Crossing of Ingo. The first book was nominated for the 2008 Booktrust Teenage Prize.[2]

IT IS A TETRALOGY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit,_Run#Characters

Rabbit, Run is a 1960 novel by John Updike. The novel depicts three months in the life of a 26-year-old former high school basketball player named Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom who is trapped in a loveless marriage and a boring sales job, and his attempts to escape the constraints of his life. It spawned several sequels, including Rabbit Redux, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, as well as a related 2001 novella, Rabbit Remembered. In these novels Updike takes a comical and retrospective look at the relentless questing life of Rabbit against the background of the major events of the latter half of the 20th century.

FOUR CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit_Redux

Rabbit Redux finds former high-school basketball star Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom working a dead-end job (as a Linotype operator at the local printing plant). He is approaching middle age in the declining and fictional city of Brewer, Pennsylvania, the place of his birth. When his wife leaves him for another man, Harry and his thirteen-year-old son are at a loss. He encounters people and events reflecting the state of the nation circa 1969.

 

Updike's recurring themes of guilt, sex, and death are joined in Redux by racism. Harry plays host to Skeeter, a cynical, drug-dealing African-American Vietnam vet who engages him in debates about the war and race relations. Jill, a wealthy white teenager fleeing suburban Connecticut, enthralls both Harry and his son. The four of them make a scandalous household emblematic of the Summer of Love's most confusing implications. Jill dies in a house fire. Harry and his wife are reconciled at book's end. The plot refers to the background of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing.

FOUR CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marry_Me_(novel)

The novel was well received by critics. In The Atlantic, Richard Todd enthusiastically welcomed the book: "'Marry Me,' for all its playfulness, is Updike's most mature work. His writing has deepened, grown wiser and funnier, like a face that is aging well."[1] In Newsweek, Peter S. Prescott called the novel Updike's most affecting. "This understatement, this unwavering vision fixed on only four characters, is a part of what makes the story so effective. Updike's best fiction has always been his most narrowly focused; in this novel the plot is direct—complex without becoming complicated by symbols thrashing obstrusively just behind the canvas—and refreshingly free from the portentousness that has marred several of his most ambitious novels. 'Mary Me' is the best written and least self-conscious of Updike's longer fiction; it contains his most sophisticated and sympathetic portraits of women. It is quite simply, Updike's best novel yet. I can't believe that anyone married or divorced could read it without being moved."[2]

FOUR CHARACTERS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marry_Me_(novel)

The novel was well received by critics. In The Atlantic, Richard Todd enthusiastically welcomed the book: "'Marry Me,' for all its playfulness, is Updike's most mature work. His writing has deepened, grown wiser and funnier, like a face that is aging well."[1] In Newsweek, Peter S. Prescott called the novel Updike's most affecting. "This understatement, this unwavering vision fixed on only four characters, is a part of what makes the story so effective. Updike's best fiction has always been his most narrowly focused; in this novel the plot is direct—complex without becoming complicated by symbols thrashing obstrusively just behind the canvas—and refreshingly free from the portentousness that has marred several of his most ambitious novels. 'Mary Me' is the best written and least self-conscious of Updike's longer fiction; it contains his most sophisticated and sympathetic portraits of women. It is quite simply, Updike's best novel yet. I can't believe that anyone married or divorced could read it without being moved."[2]