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FOUR STEPS- STARTS WITH FOUR BRANLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branle

The branle was danced by a chain of dancers, usually in couples, with linked arms or holding hands. The dance alternated a number of larger sideways steps to the left (often four) with the same number of smaller steps to the right so that the chain moved gradually to the left.

 

The first detailed sources for the dance's steps are found in Arbeau's famous text-book Orchesography. Antonius de Arena briefly describes the steps for the double and single branle (Arena 1986 [1529], 20–21), and John Marston's The Malcontent (1604) sketches the choreography of one type. According to Arbeau (1967,[page needed]), every ball began with the same four branles: the double, the single, the gay and the Burgundian branle. The double branle had a simple form involving two phrases of two bars each.

 

Arbeau gives choreographies for eight branles associated with specific regions; the Burgundian (see above) or Champagne, the Haut Barrois, the Montardon, the Poitou, the Maltese, the Scottish and the Trihory of Brittany; he also mentions four others without describing their steps; the branles of Camp, Hainaut, Avignon, and Lyon (Arbeau 1967, 135–36, 146–53, 163, 167–69). Most of these dances seem to have a genuine connection to the region: the Trihory of Brittany, Arbeau says, was seldom if ever performed around Langres where his book was published, but "I learned it long ago from a young Breton who was a fellow student of mine at Poitiers" (Arbeau 1967, 151).

MOSTLY TWO OR THREE COUPLES-- SOMETIMES FOUR- FOURTH IS DIFFERENT- RARELY ABOVE FOUR- FIFTH IS ALWAYS QUESTIOANBLE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_dance

A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures.

UP TO FOUR COUPLES- FOURTH WAS DIFFERENT- IDD NOT REALLY GO BEYOND FOUR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_dance

John Playford's The English Dancing Master (1651) listed over a hundred tunes, each with its step. This was enormously popular, reprinted constantly for 80 years and much enlarged. Playford and his successors had a practical monopoly on the publication of dance manuals until 1711, and ceased publishing around 1728. During this period English country dances took a variety of forms including finite sets for two, three and four couples as well as circles and squares.

FAMOUS BOOK ON DANCING HAS SQUARE DANCE FOURFOLD DIAGRAM 
https://en.wikipedia.org/…/File:Square_Dance_diagram_from_P…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dancing_Master
Square Dance Diagram from The Dancing Master

HE DREW A QUADRANT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Andre_Lorin.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_dance

Lorin's contradanse choreography, one of the earliest western dance notations

QUADRILLE FOUR COUPLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadrille

The Quadrille is a dance that was fashionable in late 18th- and 19th-century Europe and its colonies. Performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, it is related to American square dancing. The Lancers, a variant of the quadrille, became popular in the late 19th century and was still danced in the 20th century in folk-dance clubs. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles is known as kwadril, and the dance is also still found in Madagascar and is within old Jamaican / Caribbean culture.

FOUR COUPLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Lanciers

Les Lanciers or The Lancers is a square dance, a variant of the Quadrille, a set dance performed by four couples, particularly popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is a composite dance made up of five figures or tours, each performed four times so that each couple dances the lead part. It exists in many variants in several countries.

FOUR COUPLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_set_dance

To start, four couples are arranged in the form of a square to dance with each couple being in the middle of the sides of the square. Both the eight dancers in the group and the dance itself are called a "set". The dance is a sequence of several dance figures, which usually have a common theme or structure. The figures usually begin and end with repeated parts that everyone dances, and then during the figure each couple or pair of couples will dance separately. In the set, the couple with their backs to the band are traditionally named "First Tops" with "Second Tops" facing them. The couple on First Tops left hand side is called "First Sides" with "Second Sides" facing. Usually the First Tops are the first to dance, with some sets having First Sides and then Second Tops going next and some having Second Tops and then the First Sides. Second Sides is almost always the last couple to dance, and is therefore a good place for beginners to start, as they get more time to watch the demonstrations of the figure that the other couples give.

FOUR TABLES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinball_Dreams

The game's four tables each had a theme, as do most real life pinball & Panchinko machines. The version of Pinball Dreams bundled with the Amiga 1200 had a bug which rendered most of Beat Box's advanced features non-functional.

 

"Ignition", themed around a rocket launch, planets, and space exploration. The Expert Software's Pinball 2000 port of the game renamed this table "Rocket".

"Steel Wheel", themed around steam trains and the Old West.

"Beat Box", themed around the music industry, charts, bands and tours.

"Nightmare", themed around a graveyard, ghosts, demons, nightmares and generally evil things. Unlike the other tables in the game, the name of the table in the menu did not reflect the name displayed on the table itself—"Graveyard". Some ports of the game (notably the GameTek port to the Game Boy) name this table "Graveyard" in the menu as well.