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The five sacred mountains of the Chinese are arranged according to a quincunx (a five part cross)

Ancient legends say: Tai Shan was formed by the head of Pan Gu, who after creating heaven and earth, dies from exhaustion. His head and limbs became the five mountains. The Five Great Mountains are arranged according to the five cardinal directions:

Chinese geomancy includes the centre as a direction. 

In ancient times, Mt. Huashan was called Mt. Taihuashan. From a distance the five peaks seem to form the shape of a 'flower' (hua in Chinese), hence the name 'Huashan'.

Ziling (2003) say “According to Shu Yi Ji (or A Collection of Bizarre Stories) authored by Ren Fang of the Liang Dynasty, citing Chinese folklore, Pang Gu was the first ruler of the universe. Ren tells a story: "Once upon a time when Pang Gu died, his head became the Four Sacred Mountains, his eyes became the sun and the moon, his body fat became the rivers and the seas, his hair became prairies and forests." Legends from the Qin and Han Dynasties inform us that Pang Gu's head became the Eastern Mountain, his chest became the Central Mountain, the left arm became the Southern Mountain, his right arm became the Northern Mountain and his feet became the Western Mountain." Since the existence of this legend, the Eastern Mountain, or Mount Tai, thus became the head of the Five Sacred Mountains”. 

http://www.rupestreweb.info/china.html

Because Ahura Mazda has four day-name dedications, the month dedicated to Him has four intersections (the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-third day of the tenth month). The others have one intersection each, for example, the nineteenth day of the first month is the day of special worship of the Fravashis.
The days on which day-name and month-name dedications intersect are festival days (name-day feast days) of special worship. Because Ahura Mazda has four day-name dedications, the month dedicated to Him has four intersections (the first, eighth, fifteenth and twenty-third day of the tenth month). The others have one intersection each, for example, the nineteenth day of the first month is the day of special worship of the Fravashis.

Bahai still use this Calendar method. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoroastrian_calendar

The tombs at Naqsh-e Rustam, Iran, made in the 5th century BC, are carved into the cliffside in the shape of a cross. They are known as the "Persian crosses".
Achaemenid tombs[edit]
Four tombs belonging to Achaemenid kings are carved out of the rock face at a considerable height above the ground. The tombs are sometimes known as the Persian crosses, after the shape of the facades of the tombs. The entrance to each tomb is at the center of each cross, which opens onto to a small chamber, where the king lay in a sarcophagus. The horizontal beam of each of the tomb's facades is believed to be a replica of a Persepolitan entrance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naqsh-e_Rustam

https://en.wikipedia.org/…/File:Naghsh-e_rostam,_Irán,_2016…

They are crosses/quadrants- making a four quadrant quadrant model

QMR
The Four Pillars of Destiny is a Chinese, Japanese and Korean conceptual term describing the four components that supposedly create a person's destiny or fate. The four components within the moment of birth are year, month, day, and hour.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Pillars_of_Destiny

The Chinese word wu 巫 "shaman, wizard", indicating a man who can mediate with the powers generating things (the etymological meaning of "spirit", "god", or nomen agentis, virtus, energeia), was first recorded during the Shang dynasty (ca. 1600-1046 BCE), when a wu could be either sex. In Chinese bronze inscriptions the wu was represented by drawing a quadrant. Many Chinese would consider Jesus a wu and it is interesting that Jesus himself is represented by a quadrant/cross.

 

Mair connects the nearly identical Chinese Bronze script for wu and Western heraldic cross potent ☩, an ancient symbol of a magus or magician, which etymologically descend from the same Indo-European root.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_shamanism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:巫-bronze.svg

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6e/巫-bronze.svg/300px-巫-bronze.svg.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Mountains_of_China

The Four Sacred Mountains of Buddhism[edit]

The Roushen Temple at Jiuhua Shan
In Buddhism the Four "Sacred Mountains of China" are:[7][8][9]

Wǔtái Shān[edit]
Chinese: 五台山; "Five-Platform Mountain", Shānxī Province, 3,058 m, 39°04′45″N 113°33′53″E

Wutai is the home of the Bodhisattva of wisdom, Manjusri or Wenshu (Traditional: 文殊) in Chinese.

Éméi Shān[edit]
Chinese: 峨嵋山; "High and Lofty Mountain", Sìchuān Province, 3,099 m, 29°31′11″N 103°19′57″E

The patron bodhisattva of Emei is Samantabhadra, known in Chinese as Puxian (普贤菩萨).

Jǐuhuá Shān[edit]
simplified Chinese: 九华山; traditional Chinese: 九華山; "Nine Glories Mountain", Ānhuī Province, 1,341 m, 30°28′56″N 117°48′16″E

Many of the mountain's shrines and temples are dedicated to Ksitigarbha (known in Chinese as Dìzàng, Chinese: 地藏, in Japanese as Jizō), who is a bodhisattva and protector of beings in hell realms

Pǔtuó Shān[edit]
Chinese: 普陀山; "Mount Potalaka (Sanskrit)", Zhèjiāng Province, 284 m 30°00′35″N 122°23′06″E

This mountain is considered the bodhimanda of Avalokitesvara (Guan Yin), bodhisattva of compassion. It became a popular pilgrimage site and received imperial support in the Song Dynasty. [10]

The Four Sacred Mountains of Taoism[edit]

The Wudang Mountains
The "Four Sacred Mountains" of Taoism are:[7][11][12]

Wǔdāng Shān[edit]
simplified Chinese: 武当山; traditional Chinese: 武當山; literally "Military Wherewithal"; northwestern part of Hubei. Main peak: 1612m. 32°40′0″N 111°00′4″E.

Lónghŭ Shān[edit]
Simplified Chinese: 龙虎山; Traditional Chinese: 龍虎山; literally "Dragon and Tiger", Jiangxi. Main peak: 247.4m. 28°06′48.999″N 116°57′29.998″E

Qíyūn Shān[edit]
simplified Chinese: 齐云山; traditional Chinese: 齊雲山; literally "Neat Clouds", Anhui. Main peak: 585m. 29°48′29.9988″N 118°01′56.9994″E

Qīngchéng Shān[edit]
Chinese: 青城山; literally "Misty Green City Wall"; (Nearby city: Dujiangyan, Sichuan. Main peak: 1260m (surveyed in 2007). In ancient Chinese history, Mount Qingcheng area was famous for being for "The most secluded place in China". 30°58′35.73″N 103°30′59.90″E.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Mountains_of_China

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Way

The Fourth Way is an approach to self-development described by George Gurdjieff which he developed over years of travel in the East. It combines what he saw as three established traditional "ways" or "schools", those of the mind, emotions and body, or of yogis, monks and fakirs respectively, and is sometimes referred to as "The Work", "Work on oneself" or "The System". The exact origins of Gurdjieff's teachings are unknown, but people have offered various sources. The fourth is different from the previous three, transcending them, yet encompassing them. This is the nature of the quadrant model pattern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Mountains

 

Four Mountains

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Four Mountains (traditional Chinese: 四嶽; simplified Chinese: 四岳; pinyin: Sìyuè) variously interpreted from Chinese mythology or the most ancient level of Chinese history as being a person or four persons or four gods, depending upon the specific source. The figures feature prominently in the myth of the Great Flood, and the related myths of Emperor Yao (in whose reign the Great Flood began), Gun, Shun (Yao's successor as emperor), and Yu the Great (who finally controlled the flood waters during the reign of Shun, and later succeeded him as emperor).

 

Mythologist Yang Lihui sees Four Mountains as four gods of a set of four mountains, with Four Mountains referring to the actual mountains themselves.[1] K. C. Wu sees Four Mountains as being a ministerial position established by Yao to "oversee the mundane affairs of the empire", but points out that a real description of the functions of this position is lacking, nor is it certain whether there were one or four persons holding this ministerial position; however, he goes on to say that the evidence suggests the existence of four of them, and that they were charged with keeping themselves knowledgeable about what was going on throughout Yao's domain and advising him upon request.[2] The importance of Four Mountains can be seen in their key role in selecting Gun to be the first to be put in charge of controlling the flood, then, later, in nominating Shun to be Yao's co-emperor, and later successor.

 

Contents [hide]

1 Name

2 Cosmology

3 See also

4 Notes

4.1 References

4.2 Bibliography

Name[edit]

The name "Four Mountains" in Chinese uses 四 (sì), the standard character/word for the number four, plus 嶽 (yuè), which refers to a great mountain, or the highest peak of a mountain — in contrast to the usual word for mountain, 山 (shān), which may also be used to refer to a mere foothill or other geological prominence.

 

Cosmology[edit]

Anthony Christie relates the figure of Four Mountains to the Chinese cosmological idea of a square earth, with each of the peaks representing one of the four cardinal directions which the ruler would tour, and at which he would perform various imperial rituals, upon taking possession of his realm. The person or person(s) of Four Mountains being afterwards present in court then symbolized the completion of the ruler's having taken possession of his entire realm.[3]

http://kairos.laetusinpraesens.org/relitecx_m_h_2

TETRAGRAMMATON TAU

Although the symbol of the swastika does not rotate, concerns about an implied rotation are associated with use of the (destructive) mirror image of the "swastika" symbol sacred in both variants to Hindu culture. As the traditional counter-clockwise swirling solar cross the Omote Manji represents love and mercy, whereas the Uva Omoje represents strength and intelligence and was the clockwise rotating symbol associated with Ganesh.

 

The Tarot of the Egyptians (Thoth Deck) has symbols represented which are explicitly said to be revolving, notably that of the Tetragammaton. Seeming contradiction between symbolic elements is understood to be only the opposition necessary for balance, through their implied revolving movement. As a representation of the expansion implied by the 'the sign of the cross', the letter Tau is symbolized as four-fold through the revolving symbol of the Tetragrammaton.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexagram

 

Traditionally, the Hexagram can be seen as the combination of the four elements. Fire is symbolized as an upwards pointing triangle, while Air (its elemental opposite) is also an upwards pointing triangle, but with a horizontal line through its center. Water is symbolized as a downwards pointing triangle, while Earth (its elemental opposite) is also a downwards pointing triangle, but with a horizontal line through its center. When you combine the symbols of Fire and Water, a hexagram (six-pointed star) is created. The same follows for when you combine the symbols of Air and Earth. When you combine both hexagrams, you get the double-hexagram. Thus, a combination of the elements is created.[

16 EMPORERS MING DYNASTY- 16 SQUARES QUADRANT MODEL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_emperors_of_the_Ming_dynasty

The Ming dynasty ruled China from 1368 to 1644, succeeding the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty and falling amidst much peasant turmoil to the Manchu-ruled Qing dynasty. Sixteen emperors ruled over the whole of China spanning 276 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Ching
The I Ching is a code to make double tetrahedron merkabas
The I Ching uses a type of divination called cleromancy, which produces apparently random numbers. Four numbers, 6 through 9, are turned into a hexagram, which can then be looked up in the I Ching book, arranged in an order known as the King Wen sequence.

QUADRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lo_Shu_Square

Lo Shu Square (simplified Chinese: 洛书; traditional Chinese: 洛書; pinyin: luò shū; also written 雒書; literally: Luo (River) Book/Scroll), or the Nine Halls Diagram (simplified Chinese: 九宫图; traditional Chinese: 九宮圖; pinyin: jiǔ gōng tú), is the unique normal magic square of order three (every normal magic square of order three is obtained from the Lo Shu by rotation or reflection). Lo Shu is part of the legacy of the most ancient Chinese mathematical and divinatory (Yi Jing 易經) traditions, and is an important emblem in Feng Shui (風水), the art of geomancy concerned with the placement of objects in relation to the flow of qi (氣) "natural energy".

YELLOW RIVER MAP QUADRANT OF FIVE ELEMENTS-QUADRANTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_River_Map

The Yellow River Map, Scheme, or Diagram (河圖, with variants for the second character) is an ancient Chinese concept. It is related to the Lo Shu Square. The origins of the two from the rivers Luo and He are part of Chinese mythology. The development of the two are part of Chinese philosophy. (Wu:52)

http://research.omicsgroup.org/index.php/Swastika

Alexander Cunningham suggested that the Buddhist use of the swastika shape arose from a combination of Brahmi characters abbreviating the words su astí.

THE BOOK OF DOCUMENTS CHAPTERS ARE ARRANGED IN FOUR SECTIONS- ONE OF THE FIVE CLASSICS

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Documents

 

Traditional organization[edit]

The chapters are grouped into four sections representing different eras: the semi-mythical reign of Yu the Great, and the three ancient dynasties of the Xia, Shang and Zhou. The first two sections – on Yu the Great and the Xia dynasty – contain two chapters each in the New Text version, and though they purport to record the earliest material in the Documents, from the 2nd millennium BC, most scholars believe they were written during the Warring States period. The Shang dynasty section contains five chapters, of which the first two – the "Speech of King Tang" and "Pan Geng" – recount the conquest of the Xia by the Shang and their leadership's migration to a new capital (now identified as Anyang). The bulk of the Zhou dynasty section concerns the reign of King Cheng of Zhou (r. c. 1040–1006 BC) and the kings's uncles, the Duke of Zhou and Duke of Shao. The last four New Text chapters relate to the later Western Zhou and early Spring and Autumn periods.[27]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Rites

Sangfu Sizhi Four Principles Underlying the Dress of Mourning

Four Books[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Books_and_Five_Classics#Four_Books

The Four Books (四書; Sìshū) are Chinese classic texts illustrating the core value and belief systems in Confucianism. They were selected by Zhu Xi in the Song dynasty to serve as general introduction to Confucian thought, and they were, in the Ming and Qing dynasties, made the core of the official curriculum for the civil service examinations.[2] They are:

 

Great Learning

Originally one chapter in the Book of Rites. It consists of a short main text attributed to Confucius and nine commentary chapters by Zeng Zi, one of the disciples of Confucius. Its importance is illustrated by Zeng Zi's foreword that this is the gateway of learning.

It is significant because it expresses many themes of Chinese philosophy and political thinking, and has therefore been extremely influential both in classical and modern Chinese thought. Government, self cultivation and investigation of things are linked.

Doctrine of the Mean

Another chapter in Book of Rites, attributed to Confucius' grandson Zisi. The purpose of this small, 33-chapter book is to demonstrate the usefulness of a golden way to gain perfect virtue. It focuses on the Way (道) that is prescribed by a heavenly mandate not only to the ruler but to everyone. To follow these heavenly instructions by learning and teaching will automatically result in a Confucian virtue. Because Heaven has laid down what is the way to perfect virtue, it is not that difficult to follow the steps of the holy rulers of old if one only knows what is the right way.

Analects

A compilation of speeches by Confucius and his disciples, as well as the discussions they held. Since Confucius's time, the Analects has heavily influenced the philosophy and moral values of China and later other East Asian countries as well. The Imperial examinations, started in the Sui dynasty and eventually abolished with the founding of the Republic of China, emphasized Confucian studies and expected candidates to quote and apply the words of Confucius in their essays.

Mencius

A collection of conversations of the scholar Mencius with kings of his time. In contrast to the sayings of Confucius, which are short and self-contained, the Mencius consists of long dialogues with extensive prose.

THE FOUR BOOKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Learning

Zhu Xi published the Four Masters, a collection of the Great Learning, Doctrine of the Mean, the Mencius and the Analects.[5] These four texts soon became the initial basis of study in the Chinese imperial examination system. Zhu Xi was prompted to refine the Great Learning and incorporate it into the curriculum as he felt that the previously utilized Classics were lengthy and too difficult to comprehend by the common individual to be used as an educational foundation for Confucian thought.[5] Utilizing the much shorter and more comprehensible Four Books would allow Zhu to reach a much greater audience.[6] To aid in comprehension of the Great Learning, he spent much of his life studying the book and published a series of commentaries explaining the principal teachings of the text. The Da Xue (Ta Hsueh) itself gets its name from "ta-jen chih hsueh," referring to the education of adults. Unlike many scholars before him, Zhu Xi presents the Great Learning as the way of self cultivation and governance that is to be studied by all people, not only those in, or seeking, political office.[7

THE FOUR ASSESSORS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disciples_of_Confucius

Hui's place is on the east of the sage. He is considered the first of the Four Assessors, the most senior disciple of Confucius.[4]

16 IN ALL- 16 SQUARES QUADRANT MODEL THE FOUR THE FOURTH QUADRANT IS DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disciples_of_Confucius

Four Sages and Twelve Philosophers[edit]

Other than Confucius himself, the most venerated Confucians are the "Four Sages" or "Correlates" and the "Twelve Philosophers".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Sages

The Four Sages, Assessors,[1] or Correlates (Chinese: 四配; pinyin: Sì Pèi) are four eminent Chinese philosophers in the Confucian tradition. They are traditionally accounted a kind of sainthood and their spirit tablets are prominently placed in Confucian temples, two upon the east and two upon the west side of the Hall of the Great Completion (Dacheng Dian).

 

The Four Sages are:

 

Yan Hui, Confucius's favourite disciple

Zengzi or Zeng Shen, another disciple of Confucius and author of the Great Learning

Zisi or Kong Ji, Confucius's grandson, student of Zengzi, and author of the Doctrine of the Mean

Mencius or Master Meng, student of Zisi and author of the Mencius.

Within a traditional Confucian temple, Yan Hui's tablet is placed first to the east of Confucius.[1]

 

The families of the descendants of the Four Sages 四氏 still hold hereditary offices in the Republic of China (Taiwan) such as the Sacrificial Official to Confucius, "Sacrificial Official to Mencius", "Sacrificial Official to Zengzi", and "Sacrificial Official to Yan Hui".[2][3][4][5] They use generation poems for their names given to them by the Ming and Qing Emperors.[6][7]

The Four Books[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhu_Xi

During the Song Dynasty, Zhu Xi's teachings were considered to be unorthodox. Rather than focusing on the I Ching like other Neo-Confucians, he chose to emphasize the Four Books: the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Analects of Confucius, and the Mencius as the core curriculum for aspiring scholar officials. For all these classics he wrote extensive commentaries that were not widely recognized in his time; however, they later became accepted as the standard commentaries. The Four Books served as the basis of civil service examinations up until 1905,[21] and education in the classics often began with Zhu Xi's commentaries as the cornerstone for understanding them.[22]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mencius

The Four Beginnings (or Sprouts)[edit]

To show innate goodness, Mencius used the example of a child falling down a well. Witnesses of this event immediately feel

 

“ alarm and distress, not to gain friendship with the child's parents, nor to seek the praise of their neighbors and friends, nor because they dislike the reputation [of lack of humanity if they did not rescue the child]...

The feeling of commiseration is the beginning of humanity; the feeling of shame and dislike is the beginning of righteousness; the feeling of deference and compliance is the beginning of propriety; and the feeling of right or wrong is the beginning of wisdom.

 

Men have these Four Beginnings just as they have their four limbs. Having these Four Beginnings, but saying that they cannot develop them is to destroy themselves.[34]

 

Human nature has an innate tendency towards goodness, but moral rightness cannot be instructed down to the last detail. This is why merely external controls always fail in improving society. True improvement results from educational cultivation in favorable environments. Likewise, bad environments tend to corrupt the human will. This, however, is not proof of innate evil because a clear thinking person would avoid causing harm to others. This position of Mencius puts him between Confucians such as Xunzi who thought people were innately bad, and Taoists who believed humans did not need cultivation, they just needed to accept their innate, natural, and effortless goodness. The four beginnings/sprouts could grow and develop, or they could fail. In this way Mencius synthesized integral parts of Taoism into Confucianism. Individual effort was needed to cultivate oneself, but one's natural tendencies were good to begin with. The object of education is the cultivation of benevolence, otherwise known as Ren.

FOUR ROOTS OF MIND

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lu_Jiuyuan

Original Mind[edit]

The concept of original mind was first conceived by Mencius but was further developed by Lu. The original mind means that all human beings are born with innate moral knowledge and virtue. This original mind is fourfold as Mencius called them 'four roots of the heart':

 

Compassion - The root of humaneness (ren).

Shame - The root of righteousness (yi).

Respect - The root of propriety and ritual observance (li).

Knowledge of right and wrong - The root of wisdom (zhi).

[2]

Like real roots in nature these four roots must be nurtured first before flowers to bloom. So, in other words, these four roots of the heart are nothing but just tendencies of the mind. These four roots of the heart need proper nurturing and care to grow strong and healthy to manifest their true nature, which is moral virtue.

 

Lu believed that moral virtues are innately present in the human heart/mind and that, endowed by Heaven, humaneness and righteousness form the Original Mind of human beings. The original mind is shared by all human beings, both sages and common people, and its truth is ageless and eternal.[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abatur

 

FOUR EMANATIONS

Abatur (sometimes called Abathur, Yawar and the Ancient of Days) is the third of four emanations from the supreme, unknowable deity in the Mandaean religion. His name translates as the "father of the Uthre", the Mandaean name for celestial beings. His usual epithet is the Ancient (Atiga) and he is also called the deeply hidden and guarded. He is described as being the last son of the Second Life, or Yoshamin, the most important figure in Mandaean religion and the one from whom they took their name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversations_with_God

CwG's basic messages[edit]

In Friendship with God, Walsch writes that God presents four concepts which are central to the entire dialogue:

 

We are all one.

There's enough.

There's nothing we have to do.

Ours is not a better way, ours is merely another way.

THE FOUR MIRRORS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shikyō

Shikyō

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The shikyō (四鏡, しきょう "four mirrors") are four Japanese histories in the rekishi monogatari genre from the late Heian period to the early Muromachi period. They are also known as kagami mono (鏡物, かがみもの).[1]

 

The four histories are:

 

Ōkagami (The Great Mirror) 『大鏡』

Imakagami (Today's Mirror) 『今鏡』

Mizukagami (The Water Mirror) 『水鏡』

Masukagami (The Clear Mirror) 『増鏡』

JADE MIRROR OF THE FOUR UNKNOWNS CONSISTS OF FOUR BOOKS- WITHIN IT IS LITERALLY A QUADRANT MODEL 16 SQUARES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jade_Mirror_of_the_Four_Unknowns

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Siyuan1.png

 

Jade Mirror of the Four Unknowns,[1] Siyuan yujian (四元玉鉴), also referred to as Jade Mirror of the Four Origins,[2] is a 1303 mathematical monograph by Yuan dynasty mathematician Zhu Shijie.[3] With this masterpiece, Zhu brought Chinese algebra to its highest level.

 

The book consists of an introduction and three books, with a total of 288 problems. The first four problems in the introduction illustrate his method of the four unknowns. He showed how to convert a problem stated verbally into a system of polynomial equations (up to the 14th order), by using up to four unknowns: 天Heaven, 地Earth, 人Man, 物Matter, and then how to reduce the system to a single polynomial equation in one unknown by successive elimination of unknowns. He then solved the high-order equation by Southern Song dynasty mathematician Qin Jiushao's "Ling long kai fang" method published in Shùshū Jiǔzhāng (“Mathematical Treatise in Nine Sections”) in 1247 (more than 570 years before English mathematician William Horner's method using synthetic division). To do this, he makes use of the Pascal triangle, which he labels as the diagram of an ancient method first discovered by Jia Xian before 1050.

 

Zhu also solved square and cube roots problems by solving quadratic and cubic equations, and added to the understanding of series and progressions, classifying them according to the coefficients of the Pascal triangle. He also showed how to solve systems of linear equations by reducing the matrix of their coefficients to diagonal form. His methods predate Blaise Pascal, William Horner, and modern matrix methods by many centuries. The preface of the book describes how Zhu travelled around China for 20 years as a teacher of mathematics.

 

Jade Mirror of the Four Unknowns consists of four books, with 24 classes and 288 problems, in which 232 problems deal with Tian yuan shu, 36 problems deal with variable of two variables, 13 problems of three variables, and 7 problems of four variables.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daozang

Four Supplements 500[edit]

Great Mystery (Taixuan) 太玄部: Based on the Dao De Jing

Great Peace (Taiping) 太平部: Based on the Taiping Jing

Great Purity (Taiqing) 太清部: Based on the Taiqing Jing and other alchemical texts

Orthodox One (Zhengyi) 正一(正乙)部: Based on the Way of the Celestial Masters (Tianshi Dao) tradition.

THE FIVE GODS ARE A QUINCUNX/ A CROSS QUADRANT MADE OF FIVE PARTS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Shangdi-Huangdi_religious_cosmology.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Mountains_of_China

The five elements, cosmic deities, historical incarnations, chthonic and dragon gods, and planets, associated to the five sacred mountains. The traditional Chinese religious cosmology shows Huangdi (the Four-Faced God), embodiment of Shangdi, as the hub of the universe and the Wudi (four gods of the directions and the seasons) as his emanations. The diagram illustrated above is based on the Huainanzi.[2]

THE FIVE GREAT MOUNTAINS IN CHINA ARE A QUINCUNX- A CROSS MADE OF FIVE PARTS ONE IN THE CENTER

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Mountains_of_China

The Five Great Mountains[edit]

 

The five elements, cosmic deities, historical incarnations, chthonic and dragon gods, and planets, associated to the five sacred mountains. The traditional Chinese religious cosmology shows Huangdi (the Four-Faced God), embodiment of Shangdi, as the hub of the universe and the Wudi (four gods of the directions and the seasons) as his emanations. The diagram illustrated above is based on the Huainanzi.[2]

 

A Han Dynasty tile emblematically representing the five cardinal directions

The Five Great Mountains or Wu Yue are arranged according to the five cardinal directions of Chinese geomancy, which includes the center as a direction. The grouping of the five mountains appeared during the Warring States period (475 BC - 221 BC),[3] and the term of Wu Yue (Five Summit) was made famous during the reign of Emperor Wudi of the Western Han Dynasty 140-87 BC.[1] In Chinese traditional religion they have cosmological and theological significance as they represent on the physical plane of earth the natural order emanating from the primordial God (Tian-Shangdi), inscribing and designing China as a tán 壇, "altar", the Chinese concept equivalent of the Indian mandala.

 

The five mountains are among the best-known natural landmarks in Chinese history, and since the early periods in Chinese history, they have been the ritual sites of imperial worship and sacrifice by various emperors.[4] The first legendary sovereigns of China went on excursions or formed processions to the summits of the Five Great Mountains. Every visit took place at the same time of the year. The excursions were hunting trips and ended in ritual offerings to the reigning god.

 

The emperors, starting with the First Emperor of Qin, formalized these expeditions and incorporated them into state ritual as prescribed by Confucianism. With every new dynasty, the new emperor hurried to the Five Great Mountains in order to lay claim to his newly acquired domains. Barring a number of interruptions, this imperial custom was preserved until the end of the last dynasty, when, after the fall of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, Yuan Shikai had himself crowned as emperor at the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. But just to be safe, he also made an offer to the mountain god of the northern Heng Shan.

 

In the 2000s formal sacrifices both in Confucian and Taoist styles have been resumed. The Five Great Mountains have become places of pilgrimage where hundreds of pilgrims gather in temples and caves. Although the Five Great Mountains are not traditionally canonized as having any exclusive religious affiliations, many of them have a strong Taoist presence,[4] thus the five mountains are also grouped by some as part of "Sacred Taoist Mountains".[5] There are also various Buddhist temples and Confucian academies built on these mountains.

TAOISM AND BUDDHISM HAVE FOUR SACRED MOUNTAINS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_Mountains_of_China

The Four Sacred Mountains of Buddhism[edit]

 

The Roushen Temple at Jiuhua Shan

In Buddhism the Four "Sacred Mountains of China" are:[7][8][9]

 

Wǔtái Shān[edit]

Chinese: 五台山; "Five-Platform Mountain", Shānxī Province, 3,058 m, 39°04′45″N 113°33′53″E

 

Wutai is the home of the Bodhisattva of wisdom, Manjusri or Wenshu (Traditional: 文殊) in Chinese.

 

Éméi Shān[edit]

Chinese: 峨嵋山; "High and Lofty Mountain", Sìchuān Province, 3,099 m, 29°31′11″N 103°19′57″E

 

The patron bodhisattva of Emei is Samantabhadra, known in Chinese as Puxian (普贤菩萨).

 

Jǐuhuá Shān[edit]

simplified Chinese: 九华山; traditional Chinese: 九華山; "Nine Glories Mountain", Ānhuī Province, 1,341 m, 30°28′56″N 117°48′16″E

 

Many of the mountain's shrines and temples are dedicated to Ksitigarbha (known in Chinese as Dìzàng, Chinese: 地藏, in Japanese as Jizō), who is a bodhisattva and protector of beings in hell realms

 

Pǔtuó Shān[edit]

Chinese: 普陀山; "Mount Potalaka (Sanskrit)", Zhèjiāng Province, 284 m 30°00′35″N 122°23′06″E

 

This mountain is considered the bodhimanda of Avalokitesvara (Guan Yin), bodhisattva of compassion. It became a popular pilgrimage site and received imperial support in the Song Dynasty. [10]

 

The Four Sacred Mountains of Taoism[edit]

 

The Wudang Mountains

The "Four Sacred Mountains" of Taoism are:[7][11][12]

 

Wǔdāng Shān[edit]

simplified Chinese: 武当山; traditional Chinese: 武當山; literally "Military Wherewithal"; northwestern part of Hubei. Main peak: 1612m. 32°40′0″N 111°00′4″E.

 

Lónghŭ Shān[edit]

Simplified Chinese: 龙虎山; Traditional Chinese: 龍虎山; literally "Dragon and Tiger", Jiangxi. Main peak: 247.4m. 28°06′48.999″N 116°57′29.998″E

 

Qíyūn Shān[edit]

simplified Chinese: 齐云山; traditional Chinese: 齊雲山; literally "Neat Clouds", Anhui. Main peak: 585m. 29°48′29.9988″N 118°01′56.9994″E

 

Qīngchéng Shān[edit]

Chinese: 青城山; literally "Misty Green City Wall"; (Nearby city: Dujiangyan, Sichuan. Main peak: 1260m (surveyed in 2007). In ancient Chinese history, Mount Qingcheng area was famous for being for "The most secluded place in China". 30°58′35.73″N 103°30′59.90″E.

64 IS FOUR QUADRANT MODEL 16S- 64 HEXAGRAMS IN ICHING AND QUATERNARY DIVINATION TECHNIQUE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_number

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexagram_(I_Ching)

The I Ching dates from the 9th century BC in China.[3] The binary notation in the I Ching is used to interpret its quaternary divination technique.[4]

It is based on taoistic duality of yin and yang.[5] eight trigrams (Bagua) and a set of 64 hexagrams ("sixty-four" gua), analogous to the three-bit and six-bit binary numerals, were in use at least as early as the Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.[3]

The contemporary scholar Shao Yong rearranged the hexagrams in a format that resembles modern binary numbers, although he did not intend his arrangement to be used mathematically.[4] Viewing the least significant bit on top of single hexagrams in Shao Yong's square and reading along rows either from bottom right to top left with solid lines as 0 and broken lines as 1 or from top left to bottom right with solid lines as 1 and broken lines as 0 hexagrams can be interpreted as sequence from 0 to 63. [6]

CHINA HAS "FOUR GREAT FOLKTALES"- one of them is like Adam and Eve

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izanagi

Izanagi's visit to his wife Izanami in Yomi-no-kuni somewhat parallels the Greek Orpheus's visit to Eurydice in the underworld,[5] but a more striking resemblance is his wife's inability to return after eating the food in hell, matched by Persephone of Greek myth.[6] There is also an odd resemblance to the myth of Adam and Eve, while one of China's Four Great Folktales, Baishe Zhuan, appears to be a modernized retelling.

THE FOUR GREAT CHINESE FOLKTALES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend_of_the_White_Snake

The story is now counted as one of China's Four Great Folktales, the others being Lady Meng Jiang, Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai, and The Cowherd and the Weaving Maid (Niulang Zhinü). [1]

36 IS IMPORTANT IN MYTHOLOGY-- IT IS 9 TIMES FOUR- IN CHINA THE 36 ANIMALS WERE FOUR GROUS OF NINE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decans

The East Asian zodiac features Decans in the form of Thirty-six Calendar Animals (Sanjūroku Kingyōzō 三十六禽形像; alternatively known as the Chikusan Reiki 畜産暦). The group originated in China, wherein the 36 were divided into four clusters, with each cluster made up of nine animal-deity pairs (4 X 9 = 36). The four clusters represent the four cardinal directions (north, south, east, west). The animals are also grouped in triads—three animals are combined under one of 12 Zodiac Signs (3 X 12 = 36). In Japan, the group appeared in the Nichū Reki 二中暦, a Japanese calendar from the second half of the 14th century. Curiously, eight of the 36 appear “fox like”—almost identical in physical attributes. These eight (presented below) include the tanuki, mujna, fox, wolf, jackal, wild cat, and wild male-female dogs. The mujina, fox and rabbit are combined under the zodiacal sign of the rabbit. The tanuki, leopard, and tiger are combined under the zodiacal sign of the tiger. Western scholars have mistranslated tanuki and mujina for decades as “badger” or “racoon-dog.” But in extant artwork like that shown below, the beasts are clearly “fox-like.” It is therefore puzzling why Western scholars call them badgers and racoon dogs.:[20][21]

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