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The Western Liang (traditional Chinese: 西涼; simplified Chinese: 西凉; pinyin: Xī Liáng; 400-421) was a state of the Sixteen Kingdoms in China, one of the "Five Liang" (Wu Liang) of this era. Western Liang was founded by the Li family of the Han Chinese. The founder of the Tang Dynasty, Li Yuan (Emperor Gaozu), traced his patrilineal ancestry to the Western Liang rulers, and traced the ancestry of the Western Liang rulers to Li Guang and Laozi in the paternal line. The Li family of Western Liang were known as the Longxi Li lineage (隴西李氏).[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Liang_(Sixteen_Kingdoms)

All rulers of the Western Liang proclaimed themselves "wang".

SAMURAI FOUR CLASS SYSTEM

http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/at/tokugawa/tj06.html

Robert Oxnam :: In addition to securing political order, the Tokugawa rulers sought to ensure social order as well. To this end, they institutionalized a four-class structure designed to limit social mobility.

 

Carol Gluck :: Which is to say, you had a four, allegedly, a four-status system with the samurai at the top; next the peasants because they were the producing agriculturists, they were the root of the nation; followed by the artisans and the merchants at the bottom, because the merchants in good old Confucian parlance did not produce anything, but only trafficked in goods.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Books_of_Song

The Four Great Books of Song (simplified Chinese: 宋四大书; traditional Chinese: 宋四大書; pinyin: Sòng sì dà shū) was compiled by Li Fang (925–996) and others during the Song dynasty (960–1279). The term was coined after the last book (Cefu Yuangui) was finished during the 11th century. The four encyclopedias were published and intended to collect the whole knowledge of the new state.

 

The four books are:

 

The Taiping Yulan is a general-purpose leishu encyclopedia.

The Taiping Guangji is a collection of deities, fairies, ghost stories and theology.

The Wenyuan Yinghua is an anthology of poetry, odes, songs and other writings.

The Cefu Yuangui is a leishu encyclopedia of political essays, autobiographies, memorials and decrees.

Four Garrisons of Anxi

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Garrisons_of_Anxi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See also: Administrative divisions of the Tang dynasty

Four Garrisons of Anxi

Traditional Chinese 安西四鎮

Simplified Chinese 安西四镇

[show]Transcriptions

The Four Garrisons of Anxi were Chinese military garrisons installed by the Tang Dynasty between 648 and 658. They were stationed at the Indo-European city-states of Kucha, Hotan, Kashgar and Karashahr. Kucha was also the seat of the Protectorate General to Pacify the West. The troops were sent and stationed here from within Tang China proper.[1]

 

Based upon the Chinese texts, the Tang campaign against Kucha in 648 established Tang rule over the entire Tarim Basin. According to Zhang Guangda's theory, this is in part due to a number of inaccurate Chinese sources linking the expedition to the establishment of the Four Garrisons of Anxi. However, Zhang Guangda has used hints from excavated texts from Gaochang (Karakhoja or Turfan) dated to 654 to show that the Tang abandoned the attempt to move the headquarters of the Protectorate of the Pacified West to Kucha after the Protector-general Guo Xiaoke's assassination by Kuchean resistance forces. Instead the headquarters returned to Gaochang until 658, when it was moved back to Kucha following a Tang army's suppression of a local pro-Turk revolt.[2] The Tang only gained a loose suzerainty over the Tarim Basin states in 649, and did not establish military garrisons in the Tarim Basin. Most of the Tarim Basin states transferred their vassalage to the new Western Turk qaghan, Ashina Helu, in 651, reflecting the fact that they regarded the Western Turks as their traditional overlords. The establishment of the Four Garrisons, and with them a formal Tang military protectorate over the Tarim Basin, should be dated to 658 (after Ashina Helu's defeat) or even to 660, since Kashgar remained allied with the Western Turk leader Duman until Duman's defeat in later 659.

 

The main challengers to the Chinese for hegemony over the region were the Tibetans, who had been invading the region since 662 and seized it in 670, interrupting Chinese sovereignty in the area. According to Chinese texts, during this period the Chinese re-captured some or all of the garrisons in 675, 679, 682 and again in 686.[3] However this is disputed by Christopher Beckwith.[4]Nevertheless, Kashgar surrendered to China in 673 and Khotan in 674.[citation needed] Meanwhile, in 679, another fortress was built in Suyab, situated near the Chui River, this would later replace Karashahr as one of the Four Garrisons until 719, when the Turgesh took over it.[1]

 

With the defeat of the Tibetans in 692, and after a brief seizure of Kucha by the Turgesh for 8 months in 709, the Four Garrisons were continuously controlled by the Chinese. Even though most of the regular prefectures at Hexi Corridor, such as Liangzhou (764), Ganzhou, Suzhou (766), Guazhou (776), Yizhou (781) and Shazhou (787) were occupied between the 760s and 780s by the Tibetans, and contact between the Tarim Basin and the capital were limited, the isolated Chinese troops left in the Tarim Basin continued to hold these garrisons until 790 as attested by the pilgrim monk Wukong. In the year 790 the garrisons along with the seat of the Protectorate to Pacify the West fell one by one into Tibetan hands.[5]

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Inventions

The Four Great Inventions are the four most important inventions in the history of China. They are celebrated in Chinese culture for their historical importance. They are seen as symbols of China's advanced science and technology.[1]

 

The Four Great Inventions are:

 

The compass,[2]

Gunpowder,[3]

Papermaking,[4]

Printing.[5]

These four discoveries had a big impact on the development of Chinese civilization. They also had a big impact on global technology.[6] Some modern Chinese scholars have argued that other Chinese inventions had an even bigger impact on civilization.[7]

FOUR CLANS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_peoples_of_the_Pacific_Northwest_Coast

Succession in Tsimshian society is matrilineal, and one's place in society was determined by one's clan or phratry (defined as four equal parts). Four main Tsimshian clans form the basic phratry. The Laxsgiik (Eagle Clan) and Ganhada (Raven Clan) form one half. Gispwudwada (Killer Whale Clan) and Laxgibuu (Wolf Clan) form the other half. Prior to European contact, marriage in Tsimshian society could not take place within a half-group, for example between a Wolf and a Killer Whale. It was considered to be incest even if there was no blood relationship. Marriages were only arranged between people from clans in different halves: for example, between a Killer Whale and a Raven or Eagle.

THE MING DYNASTY DIVIDED CHINA INTO 16 PROVINCES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_China

Ming provinces[edit]

The Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) kept the province system set up by the Yuan Dynasty, however, it divided the original 10 provinces into 16 provinces.

 

Annan (安南省) 1407–1428

Fujian (福建省)

Guangdong (廣東省)

Guangxi (廣西省)

Guizhou (貴州省)

Henan (河南省)

Huguang (湖廣省)

Jiangxi (江西省)

Shaanxi (陝西省)

Shandong (山東省)

Shanxi (山西省)

Sichuan (四川省)

Yunnan (雲南省)

Zhejiang (浙江省)

Northern Zhili (北直隸省)

Southern Zhili (南直隸省)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_tones_(Middle_Chinese)

The four tones of Chinese poetry and dialectology (simplified Chinese: 四声; traditional Chinese: 四聲; pinyin: sìshēng) are four traditional tone classes[1] of Chinese words. They play an important role in Chinese poetry and in comparative studies of tonal development in the modern varieties of Chinese, both in traditional Chinese and in Western linguistics. They correspond to the phonology of Middle Chinese, and are named even or level (平 píng), rising (上 shǎng), departing (or going; 去 qù), and entering or checked (入 rù).[2] (The last three are collectively referred to as oblique 仄 (zè), an important concept in poetic tone patterns.) Due to historic splits and mergers, none of the modern varieties of Chinese have the exact four tones of Middle Chinese, but they are noted in rhyming dictionaries.

FOUR BRITISH SUBJECTS ATTACKED BY SAMURAI VERY BIG INCIDENT IN JAPANESE AFFAIRS

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namamugi_Incident

Four British subjects (a Shanghai merchant named Charles Lennox Richardson, two Yokohama-based merchants, Woodthorpe Charles Clark and William Marshall, and Margaret Watson Borradaile) were travelling for a jaunt on the Tōkaidō road through the village of Namamugi (now part of Tsurumi ward, Yokohama) en route to Kawasaki Daishi temple in present-day Kawasaki. The party had departed the treaty port of Yokohama at 2:30 pm by boat, crossing Yokohama harbour to Kanagawa village, to join their horses, which had been sent ahead.

As they passed north through Namamugi village, they encountered the large, armed retinue of Shimazu Hisamitsu, the regent and father of Shimazu Tadayoshi, the daimyō of Satsuma, heading in the other direction. The party continued to ride along the side of the road without dismounting until they reached the main body of the procession, which occupied the entire width of the road. In Japan, samurai had a legal right to strike anyone who showed disrespect (See kiri-sute gomen). However, British nationals were protected by Extraterritoriality under the Anglo-Japanese Friendship Treaty and were exempt. Richardson, leading the Britons, rode too close to the procession and did not dismount despite being gestured repeatedly to do so, and was slashed at by one of the Satsuma bodyguards. The other two men were seriously wounded (Mrs. Borrodaile was not harmed), and they rode away as fast as they could, Richardson eventually falling from his horse, mortally wounded. Hisamitsu gave the order for todome—the coup de grâce—to be given.[1] Several samurai proceeded to hack and stab at Richardson with swords and lances. A post-mortem examination of his body showed ten mortal wounds.[2] Richardson's grave is to be found in the Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery, between the later graves of Marshall and Clarke.[3] Japanese reports later accused Richardson of continuing to ride in the middle of the road, even trying to get between Hisamitsu's litter and his bodyguards. Richardson's uncle was reportedly not surprised about his nephew's demise, but blamed him for being reckless and stubborn. Frederick Wright-Bruce, the British envoy to China, remembered Richardson as an arrogant adventurer.[2]

FOUR DRAGON KINGS JAPAN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_dragon

Many Japanese dragon names are loanwords from Chinese. For instance, the Japanese counterparts of the astrological Four Symbols are:

 

Seiryū < Qinglong 青龍 "Azure Dragon"

Suzaku < Zhuque 朱雀 "Vermilion Bird"

Byakko < Baihu 白虎 "White Tiger"

Genbu < Xuanwu 玄武 "Black Tortoise"

Japanese Shiryū 四竜 "4 dragon [kings]" are the legendary Chinese Longwang 龍王 "Dragon Kings" who rule the four seas.

 

Gōkō < Aoguang 敖廣 "Dragon King of the East Sea"

Gōkin < Aoqin 敖欽 "Dragon King of the South Sea"

Gōjun < Aorun 敖閏 "Dragon King of the West Sea"

Gōjun < Aoshun 敖順 "Dragon King of the North Sea"

Some authors differentiate Japanese ryū and Chinese long dragons by the number of claws on their feet. "In Japan," writes Gould (1896:248), "it is invariably figured as possessing three claws, whereas in China it has four or five, according as it is an ordinary or an Imperial emblem."

FOUR DRAGONS VIETNAMESE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_dragon

One of four dragons in front of Ngu Long Mon

FOUR DRAGONS VIETNAMESE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_dragon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ngulongmon4.JPG

One of four dragons in front of Ngu Long Mon

THERE WERE FOUR NOBLE FAMILIES IN JAPAN- ONE OF THE CLANS THE TAIRA CLAN HAD FOUR BRANCHES- THE FUJIWARA CLAN HAD FOUR FAMILIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_clans#Four_noble_clans

Four noble clans[edit]

Gempeitōkitsu (源平藤橘?), 4 noble clans of Japan:

 

Taira clan (平氏) - also known as Heishi; 4 cadet branches of Imperial House of Japan.

 

4 families of Fujiwara (藤原四家) - descended from 4 sons of Fujiwara no Fuhito.

Fujiwara Hokke (藤原北家) - northern family; descended from Fujiwara no Fusasaki.

Fujiwara Kyōke (藤原京家) - descended from Fujiwara no Maro.

Fujiwara Nanke (藤原南家) - southern family; descended from Fujiwara no Muchimaro.

Fujiwara Shikike (藤原式家) - descended from Fujiwara no Umakai.

THE FOUR HOUSES OF THE FUJIWARA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokke_(Fujiwara)

The Hokke (藤原北家 Fujiwara Hokke?) was a cadet branch of the Fujiwara clan. It was founded by Fujiwara no Fusasaki[1]

 

Fusasaki had three brothers: Muchimaro, Maro and Umakai. These four brothers are known for having established the "four houses" of the Fujiwara.[2]

 

The Hokke is sometimes identified as the "northern house".

THE EIGHT MINISTRIES OF JAPAN WERE FOUR ON THE LEFT AND FOUR ON THE RIGHT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dainagon

The Eight Ministries[edit]

The government ministries were eight semi-independent bureaucracies. A list alone cannot reveal much about the actual functioning of the Daijō-kan, but the broad hierarchical categories do suggest the way in which governmental functions were parsed:

 

Left

Ministry of the Center.[13]

Ministry of Civil Services; also known as the "Ministry of Legislative Direction and Public Instruction".[13]

Ministry of Ceremonies; also known as the "Ministry of the Interior".[14]

Ministry of Taxation.[15]

Right

Ministry of the Military.[15]

Ministry of Justice.[16]

Ministry of the Treasury.[17]

Ministry of the Imperial Household.[18]

The specific ministries above are not grouped arbitrarily. The two court officials below had responsibility for them as follows:

 

Major Controller of the Left (左大弁 Sadaiben?)[19] This administrator was charged or tasked with supervising four ministries: Center, Civil Services, Ceremonies, and Taxation.[4]

Major Controller of the Right (右大弁 Udaiben?)[19] This administrator was charged or tasked with supervising four ministries: Military, Justice, Treasury and Imperial Household.[4]

SIXTEN ARTICLES FOUR OLDS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Guards_(China)

The 11th Plenum of the CPC Central Committee had ratified the 'Sixteen Articles' in August 1966, a document that stated the aims of the Cultural Revolution. It also highlighted the role students would be asked to play in the movement. After the 18 August rally, the Cultural Revolution Group directed the Red Guards to attack the 'Four Olds' of Chinese society (old customs, old culture, old habits and old ideas). For the rest of the year, Red Guards marched across China in a campaign to eradicate the 'Four Olds'. Old books and art were destroyed, museums were ransacked, and streets were renamed with new revolutionary names and adorned with pictures and the sayings of Mao.[12] Many famous temples, shrines, and other heritage sites in Beijing were attacked.[13]

EXTREMELY FAMOUS ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIND WITH FOUR PITS THE FOURTH DIFFERENT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terracotta_Army

Four main pits approximately 7 metres (23 ft) deep have been excavated.[24][25] These are located approximately 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) east of the burial mound. The soldiers within were laid out as if to protect the tomb from the east, where all the Qin Emperor's conquered states lay.

THE FOUR GREAT ANCIENT CAPITALS OF CHINA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_capitals_of_China

There are traditionally four historical capitals of China, collectively referred to as the "Four Great Ancient Capitals of China" (中国四大古都; 中國四大古都; Zhōngguó Sì Dà Gǔ Dū). The four are Beijing, Nanjing, Luoyang and Xi'an (Chang'an). As more new archaeological evidence began to be uncovered since the 1930s, other historical capitals have been included in the list. The phrase "Seven Ancient Capitals of China" now includes – in addition to the earlier four – Kaifeng (added in the 1920s), Hangzhou (added in the 1930s), and Anyang (added after 1988). In 2004, the China Ancient Capital Society officially included Zhengzhou as the eighth historical capital in light of new archaeological findings dating from the early Shang dynasty.

Four Bandits[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Yat-sen

During the Qing Dynasty rebellion around 1888, Sun was in Hong Kong with a group of revolutionary thinkers who were nicknamed the Four Bandits at the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese.[24] Sun, who had grown increasingly frustrated by the conservative Qing government and its refusal to adopt knowledge from the more technologically advanced Western nations, quit his medical practice in order to devote his time to transforming China.[citation needed]

THE CHINESE TEA CEREMONY HAS FOUR STEPS "IT WAS CALLED THE FOUR STEPS BASED AROUND THE FOUR SEASONS"- THEY ORGANIZE THE SETTINGS IN THE TEA CEREMONY IN FIVE PARTS ACCORDING TO THE FIVE ELEMENTS- BUT IT IS IN A QUINCUNX- A CROSS MADE OF FIVE ELEMENTS- EARTH IS IN THE CENTER AND THE OTHER FOUR ELEMENTS ARE IN THE FOUR DIRECTIONS- IT IS ORGANIZED AS 20 PLUS FOUR TEA MASTERS -- SO THE CROSS/QUADRANT IS STILL THE FOCUS JUST THERE IS FIVE ELEMENTS AND THE FIFTH IS IN THE CENTER ULTRA TRANSCENDNET

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wu_Xing

 

Tea ceremony[edit]

There are spring, summer, fall, and winter teas. The perennial tea ceremony ("perennial", literally means four steps or sequences that are linked together, each representing a season of the year) includes four tea settings (茶席) and a tea master (司茶). The tea settings are:

 

earth, (Incense), yellow, center, up and down

wood, 春風 (Spring Wind), green, east

fire, 夏露 (Summer Dew), red, south

metal, 秋籟 (Fall Sounds), white, west

water, 冬陽 (Winter Sunshine) black/blue, north

Each tea setting is arranged and stands for the four directions (north, south, east, and west). A vase of the seasons' flowers is put on tea table. Sometimes if four tea masters are included then five chairs are arranged per tea setting, making a total of twenty plus the 4 tea masters equalling 24, which symbolizes the 24 solar terms of the Chinese calendar, and represents that nature continues or is perennial.

FOUR MAJOR FAMILIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warring_States_period

The rulers of Jin had steadily lost political powers since the middle of the 6th century BC to their nominally subordinate nobles and military commanders, a situation arising from the traditions of the Jin which forbade the enfeoffment of relatives of the ducal house. This allowed other clans to gain fiefs and military authority, and decades of internecine struggle led to the establishment of four major families, the Han, Zhao, Wei and Zhi.

FOUR ELITE FAMILIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Jinyang

By 490 BC, after the destruction of the houses of Fan (范) and Zhonghang (中行), control of the State of Jin, then the largest state in China, was contested by four elite families: Zhi, Wei, Zhao, and Han. With multiple military victories under his belt, Zhi Yao (or Zhi Bo Yao 智伯瑤) of the house of Zhi exerted the most influence in the Jin court – all decisions of the state had to pass through him. He also controlled the most territory within the state. The reigning duke of Jin, Duke Ai, was powerless to restrain him.[2] So Zhi Yao, in his pride, began to demand lands from the other three houses. The houses of Wei and Han reluctantly complied to evade Zhi's wrath, but Zhao Xiangzi (趙襄子) refused to cede the territories of Lin (藺) and Gaolang (皋狼), both in modern-day Lishi, to Zhi.[3] Zhi, in retribution, formed a secret alliance with the houses of Wei and Han to attack Zhao.

THE FOUR CLASSES OF JAPAN- THE SAMURAI AT THE TOP

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edo_period

During the Tokugawa period, the social order, based on inherited position rather than personal merits, was rigid and highly formalized. At the top were the emperor and court nobles (kuge), together with the shogun and daimyōs. Below them the population was divided into four classes in a system known as mibunsei (身分制): the samurai on top (about 5% of the population) and the peasants (more than 80% of the population) on the second level. Below the peasants were the craftsmen, and even below them, on the fourth level, were the merchants.[6] Only the peasants lived in the rural areas. Samurai, craftsmen and merchants lived in the cities that were built around the daimyōs' castles, each restricted to their own quarter.

THE FOUR OCCUPATIONS FOUR CLASSES OF CHINA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_occupations

The four occupations or "four categories of the people"[1] (simplified Chinese: 士农工商; traditional Chinese: 士農工商 ) was a hierarchic social class structure developed in ancient China by either Confucian or Legalist scholars as far back as the late Zhou Dynasty and is considered a central part of the feudalism social structure (c. 1046–256 BC).[2]

THE FOURTH DIFFERENT AND IT HAS A QUADRANT TRITON ON IT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_bone

Four inscribed bones have been found at Zhengzhou in Henan: three with numbers 310, 311 and 312 in the Hebu corpus, and one containing a single character (ㄓ) which also appears in late Shang inscriptions

THE SHAOLIN MONKS FOUGHT FOUR GREAT BATTLES AGAINST THE PIRATES- ONLY FOUR WARRIOR MONKS DIED- THE FOUR HEROIC MONKS THE FOUR ARE BURIED AT MOUNT SHE NEAR SHANGHAI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaolin_Kung_Fu

The geographer Zheng Ruoceng provides the most detailed of the 16th century sources which confirm that, in 1553, Wan Biao, Vice Commissioner in Chief of the Nanjing Chief Military Commission, initiated the conscription of monks—including some from Shaolin—against the pirates.[20] Warrior monks participated in at least four battles: at the Gulf of Hangzhou in spring 1553 and in the Huangpu River delta at Wengjiagang in July 1553, Majiabang in spring 1554, and Taozhai in autumn 1555.[20]

 

The monks suffered their greatest defeat at Taozhai, where four of them fell in battle; their remains were buried under the Stūpa of the Four Heroic Monks (Si yi seng ta) at Mount She near Shanghai.[20]

 

The monks won their greatest victory at Wengjiagang.[20] On 21 July 1553, 120 warrior monks led by the Shaolin monk Tianyuan defeated a group of pirates and chased the survivors over ten days and twenty miles.[20] The pirates suffered over one hundred casualties and the monks only four.[20]

THE FOUR MAJOR APPLICATIONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styles_of_Chinese_martial_arts

Another popular method to describe a particular style of Chinese martial arts is to describe the style's emphasis in terms of the four major applications. The four major applications are: kicking (踢), hitting (打), wrestling (摔) and grabbing (拿). A complete system will necessary include all four types of applications but each style will differ in their training focus. For example, most Northern styles are said to emphasize kicking, Southern styles have a reputation for their intricate hand techniques, Shuai jiao practitioners train predominately in full-body close-range techniques, and Eagle claw fighters are noted for their Chin na expertise.

THE FIVE SHAOLIN STYLES QUADRANT PATTERN- FOURTH DIFFERENT- FIFTH ULTRA TRANSCENDENT

https://www.shaolin.com.au/AnimalLevels.html

https://www.shaolin.com.au/Animal/Types/Matrix11.jpg

 

Tiger is focused on the Real whereas the Panther prefers the Ideal; the Crane seeks to consider the Human and Social aspect where as the Snake finds peace in the past and successful experiences of others.

THE QUADRANTS OF SHAOLIN KUNG FU- PLUS THE FIFTH ULTRA TRANSCENDENT (mythical) DRAGON

https://www.shaolin.com.au/Animal/Types/Matrix05.jpg

 

https://www.shaolin.com.au/AnimalLevels.html

Almost nothing is black and white and nothing is everything as everything is not nothing or simpler put; most everything is shades of Gray. Shaolin also follow the principles of the Dao which works with Yin and Yang, the two Opposing and Complementing Universal Principles/Forces. And this is also represented in the Animal Model as The grater Yang (Tiger) lesser Yang (Panther), Lesser Yin (Crane) and greater Yin (Snake). Although we will not delve into the Dao, we will be using it's principles to explain and show the Animal Characteristics!.

 

The ludicrous representation of the Animal Style Kung Fu in moving with weird animal sounds belittled the dignity and 1000 year old tradition of the most advanced and integrated styles of martial art ever.

I POSTED A BOOK A LONG TIME AGO ON ACUPUNCTURE WHERE THE MAIN THING WAS "FOURNESS" AND TETRAHEDRONS BUT I CANT FIND THAT NOW BUT HERE IS STUFF ON TETRAHEDRONS (tetrahedrons signature for consciousness)

http://www.esotericacupuncture.com/about-esoteric-acupuncture/

http://www.esotericacupuncture.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Crown_Infinity_Pattern.jpg

Some people may feel that working with triangles and tetrahedrons represent the old, closed system. But, triangles actually represent open systems. If you draw a triangle of any size and shape on a 2-dimensional surface starting at a point which is called point A, then draw a vector from point A to point B and another vector from point B to point C and the third vector from point C back to point A, you will have an open triangle. Where the starting vector at point A touches the ending vector from point C, there is a gap. In a 2-dimensional plane, 2 points cannot occupy the same space at the same time. (See figure 1.) Since the triangle is an open polygon, it is in reality a spiral. It may be a very flat spiral, but nonetheless it is still a spiral. In the microscopic world, spirals are never stationary and are always moving and changing shape. When we open triangle A and triangle B and combine the two triangles, a tetrahedron is formed. (See figure 2.)

 

Esoteric Acupuncture emphasizes Wellness versus merely addressing disease or physical imbalances.

Esoteric Acupuncture consists of both form and formlessness. The form aspect begins with triangles that are the genesis for the New Encoding Patterns and the Chakra Balancing Patterns.

Triangles are the signature for tetrahedrons. Tetrahedrons are the signature for consciousness.

 

A tetrahedron is the simplest structure in our 3-D world that has both insidedness and outsidedness. These two qualities within a tetrahedron represent the concept of consciousness.

It requires six vectors to form a tetrahedron. Six is the minimum number of vectors necessary to create a stable structure that contains both insidedness and outsidedness. The number 6 is a key component to one’s understanding of Sacred Geometry as it is used in Esoteric Acupuncture.

FOUR COMPETING WRITING SYSTEM VIETNAM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_writing_in_Vietnam#Terminology

The use of classical Chinese, and its written form, chữ nho (or chữ Hán), died out in Vietnam early in the 20th century during the middle years of French Indochina. At this time there were briefly four competing writing systems in Vietnam; chữ nho, chữ nôm, quốc ngữ, and French.[28] Although the first romanized script quốc ngữ newspaper, Gia Dinh Bao, was founded in 1865, Vietnamese nationalists continued to use chữ nôm until after the First World War when quốc ngữ became the favoured language of the Vietnamese independence movement.[29] Some scholars still study it today although its application is mostly confined to the historic context of Vietnamese texts.

FOUR DRAGONS JAPANESE CHINESE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_dragon

Many Japanese dragon names are loanwords from Chinese. For instance, the Japanese counterparts of the astrological Four Symbols are:

 

Seiryū < Qinglong 青龍 "Azure Dragon"

Suzaku < Zhuque 朱雀 "Vermilion Bird"

Byakko < Baihu 白虎 "White Tiger"

Genbu < Xuanwu 玄武 "Black Tortoise"

Japanese Shiryū 四竜 "4 dragon [kings]" are the legendary Chinese Longwang 龍王 "Dragon Kings" who rule the four seas.

 

Gōkō < Aoguang 敖廣 "Dragon King of the East Sea"

Gōkin < Aoqin 敖欽 "Dragon King of the South Sea"

Gōjun < Aorun 敖閏 "Dragon King of the West Sea"

Gōjun < Aoshun 敖順 "Dragon King of the North Sea"

FOUR LEVELS AND FOUR GREAT COUNCILLORS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taihō_Code

The Daijō-kan, or Department of State, handled all secular matters and was headed by the Great Council of State, which was presided over by the Daijō-daijin (太政大臣, Chancellor). The Ministers of the Left and Right (Sadaijin 左大臣 and Udaijin 右大臣 respectively), Controllers of the Left and Right (Sadaiben 左大弁 and Udaiben 右大弁), four Great Councillors (Dainagon 大納言) and three Minor Councillors (Shōnagon 少納言) made up the Council, and were responsible to the Daijō-daijin. The eight government Ministries were, in turn, responsible to the Controllers and Ministers of the Left and Right.

 

Provincial organization and administration[edit]

 

Map of provinces in 701–702

The country was divided into provinces called kuni (国), and the central government appointed administrative governors, kokushi (国司), divided into four levels (the Shitōkan), kami, suke, jo and sakan to each province. The provinces were further divided into districts called gun (郡) or kōri, which were administered by locally appointed officials called gunji (郡司). These local officials were primarily responsible for keeping the peace, collecting taxes, recruiting labor for the corvée, and for keeping registers of population and land allotment. Within the districts' further subdivisions, local organization varied greatly, but often resembled the arrangement of a township of fifty or so homes led by a headman.

JAPAN FOUR GATEWAYS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakoku

Japan traded through four "gateways". Through the Matsumae clan domain in Hokkaidō (then called Ezo), they traded with the Ainu people. Through the Sō clan daimyōs of Tsushima, they had relations with Joseon dynasty Korea. The Dutch East India Company was permitted to trade at Nagasaki, alongside private Chinese traders, who also traded with the Ryūkyū Kingdom. Ryūkyū, a semi-independent kingdom for nearly all of the Edo period, was controlled by the Shimazu family daimyōs of Satsuma Domain. Tashiro Kazui has shown that trade between Japan and these entities was divided into two kinds of trade: Group A in which he places China and the Dutch, "whose relations fell under the direct jurisdiction of the Bakufu at Nagasaki" and Group B, represented by the Korean Kingdom and the Ryūkyū Kingdom, "who dealt with Tsushima (the Sō clan) and Satsuma (the Shimazu clan) domains respectively".[2]

JAPAN FOUR ISLANDS- SHIKOKU FOUR PREFECTURES

https://www.thoughtco.com/islands-of-japan-1435071

Japan is an island nation located in eastern Asia to the east of China, Russia, North Korea and South Korea. Its capital is Tokyo and it has a population of 126,475,664 people (July 2011 estimate). Japan covers an area of 145,914 square miles (377,915 sq km) that is spread out over its more than 6,500 islands. Four main islands make up Japan however and they are where its main population centers are located.

 

The largest city of Shikoku is Matsuyama and the island is divided into four prefectures. Shikoku has a varied topography that consists of a mountainous south, while there are small lowland plains on the Pacific coast near Kochi. The highest point on Shikoku is Mount Ishizuchi at 6,503 feet (1,982 m).

JAPAN FOUR MAIN ISLANDS AND SHIKOKU ONE OF THE ISLANDS IS CALLED FOUR PROVINCES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shikoku

Shikoku (四国, "four provinces") is the smallest (225 km or 139.8 mi long and between 50 and 150 km or 31.1 and 93.2 mi wide) and least populous (4,141,955 as of 2005) of the four main islands of Japan, located south of Honshu and east of the island of Kyushu. Its ancient names include Iyo-no-futana-shima (伊予之二名島), Iyo-shima (伊予島), and Futana-shima (二名島). The current name refers to the four former provinces that made up the island: Awa, Tosa, Sanuki, and Iyo.[2]

HAWAII WAS DIVIDED INTO FOUR CHIEFDOMS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Hawaii

Chiefs[edit]

Main article: Ruling chiefs of Hawaii

The four biggest islands, the island of Hawaiʻi, Maui, Kauaʻi and Oʻahu were generally ruled by their own aliʻi nui (supreme ruler) with lower ranking subordinate chiefs called aliʻi ʻaimoku, ruling individual districts with land agents called konohiki.

THE CASTE SYSTEM OF HAWAII HAD FOUR RANKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rulers_of_the_Hawaiian_Islands

The rulers of the Hawaiian islands (noho aliʻi o ko Hawaiʻi Pae ʻAina) are a line of native Hawaiians who were independent rulers of various subdivisions of the land and islands of Hawaii. Their genealogy is traced to Hānalaʻanui and others.[1] The caste system of ancient Hawaiian society was established around 1200 AD and separated the people into 4 distinct ranks that were all below the supreme ruler (ali‘i nui) of the island. The ali‘i nui would distribute the land to the lower ranking chiefs who would run the land and collect offerings and taxes. The ali‘i nui would also ultimately be responsible for the sacred kapu, a system of rules designed to control social order. The noho ali‘i were known for their brightly colored and intricately constructed battle regalia of feathered capes and helmets called a mahiole (helmet) and ʻahu ʻula (cloak or cape).

FOUR VARIEITES OF BIRD

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahiole

The colouring was achieved using different types of feathers. The black and yellow came from a bird called the Moho or ʻOʻo in Hawaiian. There were four varieties of this bird. The last type became extinct in 1987 with the probable cause being disease. Black feathers were also sourced from the bird called the Mamo which is also now extinct. The distinctive red feathers came from Vestiaria coccinea - the Scarlet Hawaiian Honeycreeper or ʻIʻiwi and the species Himatione sanguinea also known as the ʻapapane. Both species are still moderately common birds in Hawaii. Although birds were exploited for their feathers the effect on the population is thought to be minimal.[10] The birds were not killed but were caught by specialist bird catchers, a few feathers harvested and then the birds were released.[11]

16 PLANNED 16 vessel planned however only 8 completed.

Ōtori-class

 

16 vessel planned however only 1 completed.

Akizuki-subclass.

Project number F53. Final production model of the Akizuki class. Simplified more than Fuyutsuki class. Converted 5 vessels from the Maru Kyū Programme (Ship # 365-369) and 16 vessels from the Maru 5 Programme (Ship #770-785 were re-planned to #5061-5076). However, only 1 vessel was completed.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akizuki-class_destroyer_(1942)

 

The design for these ships was based on the aircraft carrier Hiryū. IJN Planned to build 16 ships, however only 3 completed, 2 almost completed but project later abandoned then scrapped after the war. One also almost completed but sunk as a target practice then salvaged later scrapped. The rest cancelled in favor for construction of Shinano.

Unryū-class

 

The Unryū-class aircraft carriers (雲龍型航空母艦 Unryū-gata Kōkūbokan) were World War II Japanese aircraft carriers. 16 carriers were planned under the Maru Kyū Programme (Ship #302 in 1941) and the Kai-Maru 5 Programme (#5001–5015 in 1942). However, only 3 of the Unryū class carriers were completed.[11][Note 1]

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unryū-class_aircraft_carrier

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Navy_ships_and_war_vessels_in_World_War_II

Quadrant

16 CAPITAL SHIPS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battleships_of_Japan

This was the genesis of the Eight-Eight Fleet Program, the development of a cohesive battle line of sixteen capital ships

THE EIGHT EIGHT PLAN 16 SHIPS TO FIGHT AMERICAS 16 CAPITAL SHIPS- 16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-eight_fleet

A further impetus to achieve the Eight-Eight Fleet ideal came from an additional expansion of the U.S. Navy under American President Woodrow Wilson's 1919 plan to build another set of 16 capital ships (on top of the 16 already authorized in 1916). In 1920, under Prime Minister Hara Takashi, a reluctant Diet was persuaded to accept a plan to bring the "Four-Four" set of modern ships up to "Eight-Eight" strength by 1927. This would have involved augmenting the Amagi-class battlecruisers with an additional four fast battleships of the new Kii class, which were marginally slower and more powerful. A further four battleships (No. 13-16) would have been built, with 18-inch guns. If completed, this would have been an "Eight-Eight Fleet" in full; if one included the oldest ships of the navy, the Fusō and Kongō classes, then the even higher goal of an "Eight-Eight-Eight Fleet" with not two but three eight-ship battle squadrons could be realized.

16 SQUARES QMR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_destroyers_of_World_War_II

The sixteen Akizuki-class (秋月, "Autumn Moon") ships were commissioned between June 1942 and January 1945. They were originally intended as anti-aircraft ships, but were instead completed as general purpose destroyers. This class was the first to be equipped with radar.[34]

FOUR PHASES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indus_Valley_Civilisation

An alternative approach by Shaffer divides the broader Indus Valley Tradition into four eras, the pre-Harappan "Early Food Producing Era," and the Regionalisation, Integration, and Localisation eras, which correspond roughly with the Early Harappan, Mature Harappan, and Late Harappan phases.[14][43]

FOUR PHASES INDUS VALLEY TRADITION

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodisation_of_the_Indus_Valley_Civilisation

The Integration Era refers to the period of the "Indus Valley Civilisation". It is a period of integration of various smaller cultures. The Localisation Era (1900-1300 BCE) is the fourth and final period of the Indus Valley Tradition. It refers to the fragmentation of the culture of the Integration Era. The Localisation Era comprises several phases:[14]

 

Punjab Phase (Cemetery H, Late Harappan). The Punjab Phase includes the Cemetery H and other cultures. Punjab Phase sites are found in Harappa and in other places.

Jhukar Phase (Jhukar and Pirak) The Jhukar Phase refers to Mohenjo-daro and sites in Sindh.

Rangpur Phase (Late Harappan and Lustrous Red Ware). Rangpur Phase sites are in Kachchh, Saurashtra and mainland Gujarat.

The Pirak Phase is a phase of the Localisation Era of both the Indus Valley Tradition and the Baluchistan Tradition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harappa

Indian epigraphist Iravatham Mahadevan postulated that the four signs were in the Indus script and called the find "the greatest archaeological discovery of a century in Tamil Nadu".[13

FOUR COMMUNIST PARTIES

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer_and_sickle

Three out of the four currently ruling Communist parties use a hammer and sickle as the party symbol: the Communist Party of China, the Communist Party of Vietnam, and the Lao People's Revolutionary Party. All of these use the yellow-on-red colour scheme. In Laos and Vietnam, the hammer and sickle flags party flags can often be seen flying side-by-side with their respective national flags.

FOUR REGIMENTS FOUR STAGES FOUR DEPARTEMNTS- FOUR CIVILIZAITONS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communist_Party_of_China

Dynon, Nicholas (July 2008). ""Four Civilizations" and the Evolution of Post-Mao Chinese Socialist Ideology". The China Journal. 60. University of Chicago Press. pp. 83–109.

 

 

The CPC continued supporting the Wuhan KMT government,[19] but on 15 July 1927 the Wuhan government expelled all communists from the KMT.[20] The CPC reacted by founding the Workers' and Peasants' Red Army of China, better known as the "Red Army", to battle the KMT. A battalion led by General Zhu De was ordered to take the city of Nanchang on 1 August 1927 in what became known as the Nanchang uprising; initially successful, they were forced into retreat after five days, marching south to Shantou, and from there being driven into the wilderness of Fujian.[20] Mao Zedong was appointed commander-in-chief of the Red Army, and led four regiments against Changsha in the Autumn Harvest Uprising, hoping to spark peasant uprisings across Hunan.[21] His plan was to attack the KMT-held city from three directions on 9 September, but the Fourth Regiment deserted to the KMT cause, attacking the Third Regiment. Mao's army made it to Changsha, but could not take it; by 15 September, he accepted defeat, with 1000 survivors marching east to the Jinggang Mountains of Jiangxi.[21][22][23]

 

From 1945 until 1949, the war had been reduced to two parties; the CPC and the KMT.[28] This period lasted through four stages; the first was from August 1945 (when the Japanese surrendered) to June 1946 (when the peace talks between the CPC and the KMT ended).[28] By 1945, the KMT had three-times more soldiers under its command than the CPC, and because of it, it looked early on like it was winning

 

The CPC currently has four main central departments: the Organization Department, responsible for overseeing provincial appointments and vetting cadres for future appointments,[71] the Publicity Department (formerly "Propaganda Department"), which oversees the media and formulates the party line to the media,[72][73] the International Department, functioning as the party's "foreign affairs ministry" with other parties,[74] and the United Front Work Department, which oversees work with the country's non-Communist parties and other mass organizations.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wu_(shaman)

Shima's (1971:418) concordance of oracle inscriptions lists 58 occurrences of the character wu: 32 in repeated compounds (most commonly 巫帝 "wu spirit/sacrifice" and 氐巫 "bring the wu) and 26 in miscellaneous contexts. Boileau (2002:354-5) differentiates four meanings of these oracular wu:

 

"a spirit, wu of the north or east, to which sacrifices are offered"

"a sacrifice, possibly linked to controlling the wind or meteorology"

"an equivalent for shi 筮, a form of divination using achilea"

"a living human being, possibly the name of a person, tribe, place, or territory"